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Full text of "Antioch News 03/01/1996"

II 1 ((3 

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ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 



- Lakeland Newspapers Welcomes 1 1 3 NEW Siibscrihen thi: 



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M R M 1. £jj_ 



J Lakeland 

Newspapers 



VOL 110 NO. 9 




THISWEEK 



COUNTY 




to 



, 




en zoning 

Petfomancezbhirig 
will be trademark 
PAGEB1 




Endorsements 

. - ■- 

Lakeland g 
N^papers' 




_ Menithinkers; 
for national; state races %■ 
RAGEB4 



BUSINESS 







totecovety 

Entrepreneur revives 
ailing Waukegs^n bus 
station R\GEC1 



SPORTS 



Mte 

Stevensont • 
Girls. 

defending ) 
state title 
PACE All 



-■-':, 






<■■ 



1 rff 

ft v J 



INDEX 



BAfik ! & Rnance.........C4 

Business ...... ......;., ...CI . 

fiEcl,.....,.: : ......vC8 

News..... ....... Bl 

CrossworcI. :.:... Bl } 

EdiTORiAl/OptNioN ...... B4 

^HevlHiwATch .....;... '.. .C}' 

• : Horoscope B22 .. 

UkElifE..... v .;.. : ........B7 

UqAl Notices .A 1 4 & G7 

-.:■'■ LipSERVJCE ...C20 

'Movies. ;.......:...B19 

ObiTUAWES.. ... ...C6 

SpoRis, ...C22 

WkEREto EAtOuT.;.BI4 





ASSOCIATION 

1996M«*>W 



ANTIOCH MARCH 1, 1996 



THR 



SS mm 

757 ttftlK STREET 
ftntioch 



O1096-A Schrooder Publication 



IL 60002 



50 CENTS 



Antioch police 

Offender sparked by TV show 'ER' 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 



Staff Reporter • 

A dramatic episode of the popular 
television show "ER" set the initial mental 
spark that led a troubled 22-ycar-oId to ignite 
a small fire which eventually set her 
apartment building ablaze in downtown 
Antioch. 

After an around-the-clock, 22-hour 
investigation, Antioch police detectives 
George Drocckcr and Craig Somcrville were 
able to charge Rachael Hopkins of Antioch 
with one count of aggravated arson for the 

Fire alarms, 
police prevent 
a deadly fire 

KEVIN HANRAHAN '" 

Staff Reporter 

A working fire alarm system and the 
quick thinking of two Antioch police officers 
prevented the fire at the Antioch Colonial 
Apartments from being a deadly tragedy, 
officials said. 

When emergency personnel arrived to 
the scene, flames engulfed the first floor and 
billows of smoke swallowed the upper two 
floors. Residents were jumping from second- . 
story windows and firelighters used ladders 
to rescue residents on the third floor. 

As one of the biggest fires in recent 
memory, there were no deaths or serious 
injuries. Three people were taken to St. 
Thcrcse Hospital and Condell Medical 
Center for smoke inhalation and later 
released, while several others were treated at 

the scene. 

"If it weren't for the alarm system going 
off and alerting the people of the problem, 
Sec PREVENT page A10 



Feb. 22 fire that has left Colonial Apartments 
uninhabitable and its residents living with 
area family and friends. 

The three-story building at 1224 Main 
Street has been vacated. Approximately, 
$100,000 of damage was done to the building. 
The first floor was destroyed by fire, while the 
second and third floors were heavily 
damaged by smoke. 

During the fire, some residents reportedly 
escaped by Jumping from second-story 
windows. The Antioch Fire pepartment with 
assistance from the Lake Villa, Fox Lake and 
Round Lake fire departments extinguished 
me flames within two hours. 

Several residents were transported to St. 
Thcrcse Hospi tal and Condell Medical Center 



~ ~on case 

for smoke inhalation and later released. 
Numerous others were treated at the scene. 

According to Deputy Chief Charles 
Watkins, Hopkins told police she wanted to 
commit suicide through smoke inhalation by 
setting a fire with rags and paper in the 
storage room, which is located in the 
basement of the apartment. 

She had just finished watching "ER" 
which featured a dramatic fire scene where 
several people suffered from smoke 
inhalation. The television show ended at 10 
p.m., and police responded to activated fire 
alarms at 1224 Main Street at about 16:05 
p.m., Watkins said. 

"We see this one or two times a year. It's a 
case of television- induced crime," Watkins 
said. 

Hopkins also locked her 2-year-old son in 
See ARSON page A10 




g»&ifegj^ ^M^^JWl 23WES? 



■ " 



Detectives George Broeckcr and Craig Somerville worked around the clock to solve (he 
arson case at Colonial Apartments. —Photo by Kevin Hanrahan 



Banker tells of a painless bone marrow donation 




KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Becoming a bone marrow donor is not as 
painful as people arc sometimes led to 
believe. In fact, the procedure is relatively 
rM quick and painless. 

Just ask Ted Axton, president of the First 
National Bank of Antioch. 

Despite the horror stories about 



thousands of 
punctures in 
one's lower back 
to draw the 
marrow from the 



'This community 
seizes the 
opportunity to 

hip-rcgion, Axton help people out, 



but seldom does 
someone have an 
opportunity to save 
another person's 

life/ 

— Ted Axton 



Ted Axton, 
34-year-old 



president of 
Philadelphia 



First National Bank of Antioch, donated his bone marrow to a 
woman suffering from leukemia.— Photo by Kevin Hanrahan 



only has four 
small pricks on 
his lower back to 
show for his bone 
marrow donation. 
What is more, 
Axton was 

scheduled for 
surgery on — ^— —- ■"■""' — — —~ 

Thursday, Feb. 8, at 9 a.m. His surgery was 
completed by 10:30 a.m., and he was home 
from Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge 

by 4 p.m. 

The next day he was driving and running 
errands and even stopped at work. He 
stopped taking the pain pills later on Friday, 
See DONATION page A10 



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MarcIi 1, 1996 LAkelANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 




Deal me in! 

Rachel Romie, Antioch plays a game of cards with Elwin Wightman during a visit to Victory 
Lakes in Lindenhurst. The Seventh Day Adventist Christian School of Lake County had the 
opportunity to meet and share some special time with the residents of Victory Lakes.— Photo by 
Linda Chapman 



Township sewer study to begin 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

The much-awaited sewer study to determine 
potential sewer service for Antioch Township resi- 
dents is expected to begin soon. 

According to Carolyn Jonitcs, president of the ' 
United. Homeowners' .Associations of 
Unincorporated Antioch (UHAUA), a "Notice to 
Proceed" was signed Feb. 23. 

Led by Judy Martini of Antioch, Lake County 
Board members voted in December to spend more 
than $20,000 to conduct a feasibility study to deter- 
mine the possibility and cost analysis of providing 
sewer service to unincorporated residents with sep- 
tic systems. 

Devcry Engineering Inc. of Libcrtyviilc, which 
will conduct the study, will also study non-sewer 
alternatives. Septic systems have been blamed for 
contaminating the area's lakes and well systems 
during spring thaws and heavy rains. 



"They can start, and the study should be com- 
pleted in about 10 weeks," Jonitcs said. 

Jonites also reported that representatives from 
the Stormwater Management Commission are 
expected to attend the next UHAUA meeting to dis- 
cuss flooding in unincorporated Antioch Township. 

"Based on a study they did last fall, they have 
solutions in place to help areas that flood in our 
township," Jonitcs said. She said details to those 
solutions will be discussed when the SMC represen- 
tatives speak at the next UHAUA meeting. 

Jonitcs also has boon speaking, with the? Fox 

Waterway Agency and learned the agency is pursu- 
ing a grant to study the water quality of Lake 
Catherine in Antioch. 

"It will probably be in the fall that they would get 
the grant, if they get it," Jonitcs said. 

The next UHAUA meeting is planned for March 
12 at 7:30 p.m. at St Stephen's Church on Hillside 
Avenue. For more information, call 395-7371. 



Village stands by school on impact fees 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporter 

Antioch trustees stuck to their 



Lakeland < usps . 

^P«» 027-080) 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

OHica of Publication: 30 Soulh Whitney St., 
Grayalolu*. IL 60030. Phono (709)223-8161. 

Published weekly, second class postage paid at 
Qfoyslake, IL 60030. 

Mail Subscription Rates: $24.50 Per Year by Mail 
paid in advance in Lake, Cook, Kenosha and 
McHen7 Counties; ebewhefe $35,00 Per Year 
by Mail paid in advance. 

Poslmaaten Send address changes to Antioch 
News- Reporter, 30 South Whilney Street, P.O. 
Box 266, Graystake, Illinois 60030. 

(847) 223-8161 



Antioch News-Reporter 

Laka Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundete'm News 
Grayslato times 
Fox Lake Press 



Gumee Press 

Round Lake News 

Wauconda Leader 

Lbortyville News 

Lindenhurst News 

Warren-Newport Press 



Vemon Hib News 

M.R. SCHROEDER 

Foundor-1904-1986 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publlshor/Prestden* 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Goneral Manager 

ESTHER DECKER HEBBARD 
R0SELLEL0VE MIMIKOOB 

Carfo lieo Up. Awtrtrr; U? 

NANCY MURRELL KAREN OTOOLE 
RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

,. . . EdtWitOwf -. .- - 



guns by delaying preliminary 
approval to the final phase of the 
Pine Hill Lakes development. 

The developer hoped to gain 
preliminary approval In order to 
begin engineering for the final 59 
lots of the residential development 
in far east Antioch. 

Trustee Marvin Oldcnburger, 
however, urged the board to 
adhere to the wishes of the 
Planning and Zoning Board to 
delay approval until an impact fee 
issue was settled between the 
developer and Antioch School 
District 34. 

Richard Vane, an engineer 
hired by the developer, said much 
of the engineering work cannot 
begin until the preliminary plans 
are approved by the board. 

"We had hoped to be moving 
ground this fall," Vale said "fThc 
developer) has every intention of 
negotiating In good faith with the 
school." 

According to Robert Silhan, 
director of planning, zoning and 
building, the village increased its 



school impact fees last September. 
Trustees updated the village's 
school impact ordinance to $3,000 
for a 3-bcdroom home and to 
$3,500 for a 4-bcdroom home. 

Silhan said the issue between 
the schools and the developer is 
which impact fees is the developer 
liable for now. 

"Pine Hill Lakes was a develop- 
ment that was originally approved 
back in 1989, and there's a different 
fee structure now," Silhan said. 

Oldcnburger said the developer 
has been aware of the new school 
impact fees, and traditionally the 
village board does not finalize a 
development until peace has been 
made with the schools. 

"It's not a new issue. Ifs been 
out there since the fall," 
Oldenburger said of the impact 
fees. 

Trustees unanimously voted to 
defer final approval until the school 
impact fee issue was settled. 

"We prefer to have the matter 
settled," said Mayor Marilyn 
Shincflug. 



Vikings Football sets meeting 

Antioch Viking Football will hold an open meeting March 7 at 
7:30 p.m. at the Antioch Village I IalL The purpose of the meeting V 
Is to review the results of the 1995 raffle fund raiser and to explore 
ideas to generate operational funds for 1996.. Everyone Interested 
in supporting the future of Antioch Viking Football is welcome to 
..attend. . .^'^r^-.^v-■*-">-^---- , '^^"•'■'"^^">^ v '-••'■ ; -' •■"■■■ : - •-■■«*■ 



- ■ . 



Antioch parks to see 
major improvements 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch parks will be bustling 
with activity in addition to the 
everyday park goers. 

The Antioch Parks and 
Recreation Department Is propos- 
ing more than $81,000 in improve- 
ments this year. 

"Between the improvements 
and more programs, I hope to bring 
more and more people out to the 
parks," said Cheryl McCameron, 
director of the Parks and 
Recreation Department 

The 8-acre Pedersen Park will 
be home to a new outdoor pavilion. 
The 40-by-40 foot pavilion will be 
shaped like a hexagon and offer a 
canopy like a gazebo. Its estimated 
cost is $15,000. 

"One of the major improve- 
ments we're doing this year is the 
pavilion," McCameron said. "It will 
be nice to have a shelter there for 
family picnics or for when it rains." 

With the assistance of the 
Antioch Garden dub, Pedersen 
Park will also be home to a new 
flower garden, dub members and 
park goers will be able to plant var- 
ious wild flowers, bulbs and other 
flowers. 

North Park will also undergo a 
major facelift as approximately 75 
new trees arc expected to be plant- 
ed as part of the Arbor Day 
Committee's major project this 
year. 

The park will also gain a new 

sand volleyball court as well as 

more benches and tables, and 

some landscaping upgrades. 

. "At one time, there was nothing 

rlicno midnof nuicJ] recrcutionu] 

opportunities," McCameron noted 
about North Park. "Now there are 
basketball courts, a playground 
and a new sand volleyball court 
coming." 

The benches are planned for 
the small end of the park. "It's a 
nice park because you have an 
active area, and the pond for pas- 
sive recreation," McCameron 
said. 

Antioch's "showcase" park, 
Centennial Park, will receive a 
$10,000 walking trail to circle the 



park. It will also have additional 
benches for the Softball fields, 

Osmond Park is expected to get 
approximately $5,000 in new 
equipment, but McCameron said 
her department will be seeking 

'Between improvements 
and more programs, I 
hope to bring more and 
more people out to the 
parks/ 

— Cheryl McCameron 

input from the community to 
determine what type of equipment 
should be Installed 

"We're going to sec what we 
need out there," McCameron said. 
At Williams Park, fencing will be 
erected along the railroad tracks to 
provide a buffer. New playground 
equipment is planned for the 
future. 

The other parks will also receive 
some maintenance improvements 
such as fencing around the outdoor 
restrooms. 

The pool will receive approxi- 
mately $22,000 in upgrades for new 
filters and a spare pump. Several 
maintenance and repair projects 
are also planned at the Scout 
House. 

McCameron said she was excit- 
ed about upgrading the basement 
floor from concrete to wood at the 
Senior Citizen Building. The 
$11,000 in improvements will allow 
the parks department to schedule 
more Indoor programs at the cen- 
ter. 

*Wo tion't ham a major rccre- 
utiorr center like some park dis- 
tricts, but we can plan a lot of pro- 
grams at the senior center In base- 
ment," McCameron said. "It works 
great because it doesn't interfere 
with the seniors. Perhaps in the 
future, we'll do some aerobics and 
some tumbling classes." 

McCameron said the improve- 
ment plan aims to attract more 
interest in Antioch parks. 

"I welcome phone caUs from 
people in the village," McCameron 
said. "It's important" 





ui- 





8 



KEVIN HANRAHAN . 

Staff Reporter 

While the Antioch Parks and Recreation Department pursues 
^an aggressive capital improvement plan this year, it will also add 
'several new programs. 
\fhe parks department is joining the latest craze of in-line skat- 
ing. It will offer "In-line Skating Instruction" and "Roller Hockey" 
for beginners on Tuesdays March 5 to April 2 and April 9 to April 
30. 

The instruction class will be from 6:30 to 7:30 and the roller 
hockey class will be from 7:30 to 8:30 at W.C. Petty School. - 

"It's popular, and we have limited places for kids to go for In- 
line skating," said Cheryl McCameron, director of the Parks and 
Recreation Department 

The Instruction class will cover the basics of in-line skating as 
well as safety measures skaters should consider. The roller hockey 
class aims to develop skills and offer games. 

The classes are open for children age 6 to 12. 

Other new programs which will be featured in the parks and 
recreation brochure'due out this week Include ballet, tiny tum- 
bling, rhythm and coordination for boys, and baton and pom 
pons classes. Most of the classes are geared for children age 3 to 6. 

"I think there's a high demand for that age group, and parents 
tend to socialize with each other when they take their kids to the 
programs," McCameron said. 

Hdrsemanshlp'at Silver Creek Farms will also be offered this 
year, and McCameron will also offer "Aquaroblcs" and "Life 
Guard certification'' classes this summer as well. 

She intends on developing more programs for teens, 

TWe really strive to offer affordable programs," McCameron 
said. "We're looking for more participation and more Involvement 
as we try to provide more recreational opportunities.'' ^ , 



ient 



,>1 



X 




COMMUNITY UIceIancI Newspapers MarcIi 1, 1996 






Drug dealer's money given to school programs 



Lake County State's Attorney 
Michael J, Waller announced that 
he has awarded grants to several 
school and youth service organiza- 
tions that are committed to fighting 
drug abuse in the Lake County 
Schools. Funds were approved and 
distributed to the following schools 
and organizations: Stanton School, 
Fox Lake; Mundelcin High School, 
Mundelcin; Beach School, Round 

Meetings for 
moms offered 

Weekly meetings arc offered 
by ChildScrv for mothers and 
their young children, ages infant 
through prc-school. As a mother, 
you can enjoy speakers, crafts, 
support of other mothers and a 
little time to yourself. 

An on-site child care program 
is also provided at no charge. 
Meetings arc held Tuesdays 10 
a.m. to 12 p.m. at the First Baptist 
Church in North Chicago, 
Thursdays 9:30 to 11:30 a.m, at 
the Inglcside United Methodist 
Church, and on Fridays 9:30 to 
11:30 a.m. at the First United 
Methodist Church in Waukcgan. 
For more information, call Elaine 
at 263-2200 

Youth Orchestras 
present Chamber 
Music Concert 

The Uke County Youth 
Orchestras, under the direction 
of lidward Wilcox, will present 
their annual Chamber Music 
Concert at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, 
March 9 at the United Protestant 
Church in Grayslakc on Whitney 
and Park. Tickets arc $5. Children 
under 10 are admitted free. 

The program will include 
music by Hach, Beethoven, 
Klcngcl, Tclcmann and Tartini 
and has been prepared with the 
assistance of cellist Anthony 
I'ortcr and violinist Stanley 
Ackcrman, sectional coaches of 
LCYO. 

Anyone wishing to become 
involved in helping with the 
Orchestras may contact (R47) 
223-3206 or (847) 548-7531 for 
further information. 




BARK 'N 1 TOWN 
KENNELS 



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Lake; Uncolnshirc-Prairic View 
School District 103, Lake Forest; 
Glen School, Fox Lake; Lotus 
School, Spring Grove; Forest 
School, Fox Lake; Murphy School, 
Round Lake; and St Joseph School, 
Round Lake. 

Also, Village School, Round 
Lake; Fills School, Round Lake; 
Indian Hill School, Round Lake; 
Waukcgan Public School District 
60, Waukcgan; lincolnshire Police 
Dcpt Lincolnshire; Our Lady of 
Humility School, Zion; Gages hike 



School, Gages I.akc (SEDOL) and 
the Waukcgan Exchange Club. 

The money being used has been 
obtained by the State's Attorney's 
Office from property forfeited from 
drug dealers in Lake County. Under 
Illinois law, the State's Attorney has 
broad discretion in the use of such 
funds, as long as the money Is spent 
on efforts to fight the distribution of 
narcotics. Waller announced that 
this program will be continued and 
that future grants should be forth- 
coming. 



\\V|t: 




l Pledge Allegiance 

Members of the Antioch VFW came to Oakland School to 
hear the kindergarten students recite the pledge to the flag 
which they learned in school. Each kindergarten student 
received a certificate and small Amercian flag from the mem- 
bers of the VFW. VFW members with students are Al Himber, 
Stan jendras, Joan Jendras, and Chuck Hamlin. 



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School BmEfs — 

ANTIOCH HIGH SCHOOL 

Senior wins Target scholarship 

Lisa Dusak, a senior at Antioch Community High School, 
was one of 38 students in the Chicago area to win a $1,000 
scholarship presented by Target stores. Recipients were select- 
ed by a committee from the Citizen's Scholarship Foundation of 
America. Awards were based on three criteria: length of time 
and hours of community or volunteer service, a grade point 
average of at least 2.0 and an essay on the role of the family. 

School sets 'Swing Street' musical 

From Count Basle to the Beatles and from the Big Band Era 
to the show tunes of Broadway, students in the fine arts depart- 
ment of Antioch Community High School arc preparing for the 
annual "Swing Street Cafe" March 8 and March 9 at 7:30 p.m. in 
the southgym. Admission Is $6 for adults and $4 for students 
and senior citizens. 

W.C. PETTY SCHOOL 

School names top spellers 

The Spelling Bee champion at W.C. Petty School Is Rachel 
Hcichcrt, who represented the school at the sectional spelling bee 
in Round I;ikc. Kristcn Kcssctl earned alternate honors. Other top 
spellers Included Jessi Enright, Jamie Huebner, Dan Cichon, Gary 
Romano, Katie Savino, Sabrina Stone, Tricia Moore, Mcaghan 
Bartz, Rachel Markovich, Shannon Propcck, Marie Hefferman, 
Jessica Curtis, Jacob Ring, and Michelle Lcnczuk, 

Students of the month selected 

At the last awards assembly, the following students were rec- 
ognized for their outstanding ability in Reading: Michael Long, 
Jessie Smousc, Mitch Elliot, Michael Whittem, Jennifer Hoffman, 
Christine Shea, Mike Tiddens, Phillip Bcdnar, Rachel Markovich, 
Erin Novi, Rachel Rcichcrt, Ben Newton, Joseph Lorcnzini, Kristcn 
Karla, Amy llession, Shannon Stewart, and Greg Borg. 



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Police Beat 




Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven guilty in a 

court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

Party Poppers pilfered with purse 

Antioch police arrested Cynthia Stopa, 41, of Wilmot, Wis., 
Feb. 23 for retail theft after she removed several items from Party 
Poppers. According to police reports, the owner of Party Poppers 
observed Stopa putting numerous party items valued at $24.98 in 
her purse. Police said Stopa pleaded with the owner by crying, 
"I'm sorry. I didn't know what I was doing." She later admitted to 
police of emptying her purse prior to entering the store to make it 
casicrto fill die purse. Ihc pilfered items included three packs of 
napkins, five party banners, one pack of blow horns, one candle, 
and two packs of horns. Stopa was released on recognizance bond 
and will appear in Grayslakc court March 27. 

Police stop swaying driver 

On Feb. 25, police arrested Mike Johnson, 37, of Trevor, 
Wis., for driving under the influence. Police observed Johnson 
cross the centerline on Deep Lake Road south of Route 173. 
Police also observed him run off the roadway. He was traveling 
35 mph in a 40 mph zone. Police also said he swayed while 
standing, was unable to stand unsupported and fumbled for his 
license. Johnson refused breath tests. He is scheduled for 
Waukcgan court March 19. 

Oil shortage yields pot bust 

Police arrested Brian Little, 22, and Gary Little, 23, of 
Bristol, Wis., after they pulled their vehicle on Deep Lake 
Road Feb. 24. According to police, they pulled their vehicle 
onto the shoulder north of Hidden Creek after they realized 
the vehicle was short of oil. When police came to assist, 
police asked for identification. Upon further investigation, 
Brian Little's license returned suspended in Illinois, and Gary 
Little's license returned revoked in Illinois and suspended in 
Wisconsin. Police also noticed a "bulge" in Brian's pocket in 
which he described as "That's my bowl." Police confiscated 
the smoking pipe and charged him with possesion of 
cannabis. Gary Litdc was charged with driving while his 
license was revoked. Both were released on recognizance 
bonds and will appear in Grayslakc court April 10. 



Missing boy sparks quick search 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Thanks to some quick action 
by neighbors and Antioch High 
School track athletes, the popular 
"Neighborhood Watch" program 
took on a new meaning last week 
as a quiet neighborhood turned 
frantic. 

When Barbara Hall, who was 
watching a handful of neighbor- 
hood kids play in her front yard on 
Garys Drive in Antioch, went to 
answer a ringing phone, she 
noticed her 3-year-old son, Eddie, 
was missing when she returned to 
the front yard. 

Apparently, Eddie hopped on 
his bicycle equipped with training 



wheels and decided to take a ride 
for the park without letting any- 
body know. 

Hall was not aware of his 
whereabouts and quickly 
shouted for help. 

"It was a pretty scary five min- 
utes. I thought somclxidy drove by 
and picked him up, but he was 
down the road on his bike, thinking 
he was going to the park," Hall said. 

While Hall was shouting for 
help, four female track students in 



watchful eye for Eddie while they 
ran through the neighborhood 

A nearby neighbor also heard 
Hall's picas and intercepted Eddie 
as he drove by on his bike appar- 
ently destined for Centennial Park. 

"I don't know her very well, 
but she volunteered to run down 
the road to look for him," Hall 
said of her neighbor, whose name 
Hall did not know. 

The track athletes also eventu- 
ally came across Eddie when he 



training happened to be running was walking down the sidewalk 



through the quiet neighborhood. 

Track members Alicia Cannon, 
Brandy Brown, Kim Erickson and 
Jenny Minor responded to Hall's 
desperate pleas for help and kept a 



Child seatbelt report clarified 



A clarification is merited in 
regards to a police report in last 
week's edition of Lakeland 
Newspapers. 

Lakeland Newspapers learned 
only one ticket was issued to 
Jacqueline Nolan, 27, of Antioch, 
for failure to secure a child in a 
restraint scat or seatbelt. 

The police reported Feb. 14 
that police observed "several 
young juveniles between the ages 
of 2 to 5 unsecured, jumping up 
and down uncontrollably." 

According ■ to David 

Enzenbacher, a close relation to 
Nolan, there were two children 
traveling with Nolan in a 1984 con- 
version van. A 3-year-old was 
properly restrained, while a 5- 
ycar-old temporarily unsecured 
her seatbelt when police observed 
the incident 

"It wasn't several children 
jumping up and down uncontrol- 



lably," Enzenbacher said. "This 
was a situation when a child was 
properly restrained and one child 
happened to get out of the seat." 

Nolan, in fact, was only issued 
one ticket for failure to secure a 
child in a restraint scat or seat 
belt She was also found to be dri- 
ving with a revoked license. She 
wiU appear in Grayslakc court 
March 27. 

Lakeland Newspapers regrets 
any misinterpretation. — by 

KEVIN HANRAHAN 



with Hall's neighbor. 

"The kids were running 
through the neighborhood and 1 
asked for their help," Hall said of 
the track students. "They were 
looking for him when they found 
him walking with my neighbor." 

The track students confirmed 
Eddie's Identity with the neighbor. 

"They were shocked that this 
happened, but they were relieved 
when they found them," said 
Nancy Cannon, mother of Alicia. 
"It was a happy ending." 

Antioch police responded min- 
utes later. 

"By the time we responded, the 
child was found," said Chief 
Charles Miller. "These happen 
quite frequentiy. They're curious 
at that age." 

Hal! noted the whole episode 
happened within a five-minute 
time span. 



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Can the family survive past the year 2000? t needs 
to...and for the sake of our world, It must. Join us for the 
FAMILY SURVIVAL 2000 at Fox Lake Baptist Church, 
beginning at 10:40 ajn. each Sunday, as we consider how 
to strengthen families. 

MAR. 3: "Can Religion Really Help a Family?" 
MAR. 10: "Crisis: Opportunity for Family Growth." 

MAR. 17: "Communication: 

Clearing the Path for Intimacy.' 

MAR. 24: "Vour Marriage: Maruel or Madness?" 
Fox Lake Baptist Church 27430 Nlpperslnk Ingleside, II 60041 
Mike Vanlanlirgham, Senior Pastor (847) 5B7-7722 ^ 



J 









4- 







COMMUNITY UklANd Newspapers MarcIi 1, 1996 



Let's pull together for Rachael 



There is a little girl, a resi- 
dent of Antioch, who desperate- 
ly needs our help. The fine 
townsfolk of Antioch arc being 
called on to reach into their 
hearts and support this special 
6-ycar-old child. Young Rachael 
Lugo was diagnosed with 
leukemia shortly before 
Christmas. She has been receiv- 
ing treatment up at Children's 
Hospital in Milwaukee, which 
has put an enormous emotional 
as well as financial burden on 
her family. 

The local schools have been 
trying to defray some of the 
medical expenses by raising 
money with cookie sales and so- 
liciting donations from various 
school organizations. Now some 
of the good folks of this town 
have arranged for a Spaghetti 
Dinner to take place on Sunday, 
March 3, with all proceeds going 
to this worthwhile cause. The 
dinner will run from noon until 
7:30 p.m. at Antioch High 
School. Tickets for the event arc 
$5.95 for adults and $3.95 for 
kids years old and under. 
Advanced tickets may be pur- 
chased at the First National 
Dank of Antioch, Quiltcr's 
Dream (located next to the Anti- 
och Theater) and Barbie's BBQ 
rformcrly Weasels); tickets will 
also be available at the door. 

Raffles will also be held with 

items being donated by local 

restaurants, Ace Hardware, 

Schwinn Bike Shop, Ben 

Franklin, True Value Hardware, 

Antioch Theater, Craft Pack, 

Attmnn's Flower Shop, Toys-Ii- 
Us, Kristofs and K-Mart, just to 
name a few. 

Now if Sunday rolls around 
and you find yourself entertain- 
ing relatives or fulfilling some 



prior family commitment, there 
has also been a trust fund set up 
for any monetary contributions. 
Send your donation to: The First 
National Bank of Antioch, 495 
Lake St., Antioch, IL 60002 c/o 



JINGLE FROM PRINGLE 



LYNN 
PRINGLE 




595>6J64 



Rachael Lugo Friendship Trust. 
Just so you know, this money 
isn't being spent frivolously on 
lavish dinners or expensive cars. 
It all goes directly to pay 
Rachacl';s mounting medical 
bills and provide some assis- 
tance to her mom for the daily 
commute from Antioch to 
Milwaukee. So if we all take just 
a few minutes out of our hectic 
schedules to sit down and eat a 
plate of pasta, just think what an 
impact we can make on a tragic 
situation — hey we all have to 
eat. So be it lunch or dinner, 
let's show what a big difference 
our small town can make. 

Happy birthday 

Well once again we find our- 
selves at the beginning of a 
month, which for some folks 
means your Social Security 
checks should be in the mail, and 
for others it means you will be 
celebrating a birthday. 1 wish to 
indulge all my readers in taking a 
moment to wish a very happy 

birthday to soma noted Folks: 

Our very own little 



Stephanie who will turn 4 this 
month; without mentioning age, 
my brother celebrates his birth- 
day and let's just say he's not as 
old as his receding hairline makes 
him look; young Nick Scamon, or 
Nick S. as he's known at school, 
will be celebrating with a skating 
party complete with pizza and 
cake; and the very famous, some 
what of a celebrity in this town 
even though she doesn't reside 
here— the famous "Sylvia from 
The City" (hold your applause). 
No word on how old Uiis one is 
but I think she entered this world 
just shortly after dirt was discov- 
ered. 

We also have two little guys 
celebrating first birthdays this 
month: Michael Trischan and 
David VanArsdall. Hope you 
guys get lots of those boy toys. 

Now for all you other folks 
who will be receiving cards, 
flowers, presents and the always 
favored monetary gifts this 
month, happy, happy: Valeric 
Aronson, Nathan Boas, Beth 
Bocrman, Tyler Bolton, Amanda 
Cramer, Michaclinc Dituro, 
Janessa Emerson, LindscyFilips, 
Jim Foerstcr, Katie Green, Carrie 
Miller, Sally Hillcr, Candicc 
Kasprzak, Aimcc Kitto, Jeff 
LaForgc, Dylan Lichtcr, Tommy 
Marquart, Kyle Milovanovic, 
Kccgan Misch, Brian Mozal, Bob 
Olcnick, Wayne Olscn Jr., Dar- 
lcnc Scharlau, lim Schmchl Sr., 
Lori Tcatcrs, Tara Tybor, and 
Jon Utinans. Happy birthday to 
all and to all a good day. 

So goes another "Jingle From 
PrJnglc" — don't forget to call 
395-6364. 



825S2E! Lakeland 



TODAY! 



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/ 



Animal lovers build r GoldEiN AiNi\livERSARV 
new home for orphans — 




ELIZABETH FAKFN 

Staff Reporter 

Fluffy and Fido will get a new 
haven in Grayslakc by summer. 
Savc-A-Pct a humane home for 
stray, abandoned or unclaimed 
cats and dogs is scheduled to 
open June 1. 

The no kill animal shelter 
operates on the philosophy of pro- 
viding a humane environment for 
animals. It works to place animals 
In a home as soon as possible from 
the time they arc brought in and 
does its best to make the animals 
adaptable. They train and work 
with them to rehabilitate the ani- 
mals. It will only euthanize ani- 
mals in extreme cases such as sick- 
ness, according to Executive 
Director Bonnie JacobL 

The shelter is moving to 
Grayslake because it has out- 
grown the current location in 
Palatine. 

Savc-A-Pct was founded in 
1972 in Highland Park and 
placed animals in homes as 
temporary shelters until they 
were adopted. The shelter 
opened at the Palatine site in 
1975 and will move into Its new 
building sometime in May. The 
grand opening will be held June 
1-2, 31664 N. Fairfield Road 
between Routes 60 and 120. 

The new shelter has been 
under construction for the last 
eight months. The shelter cur- 
rently houses approximately 65 
dogs and 120 cats. "We expect 
figures to go up 20 percent when 
we move," said Jacobl who 
added the idea of moving isn't to 
take on more animals; it's to 
provide more humane housing. 

Geo-Karis sponsors 
measure to restrict 
unfunded mandates 

A constitutional amendment 
pending in the Illinois Senate 
would limit the state govern- 
ment's power to impose new 
laws or regulations on local 
government without providing 
the funds to pay for them, said 
Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis (R- 
Zion). 

"Legislators and regulators 
in Springfield all too often pass 
requirements down to local 
government bodies without . 
providing funds to implement 
them," said Geo-Karis, a co.- 
sponsor of the measure. "These 
mandates can be very difficult 
for local governments to meet 
and sometimes forces them to 
raise taxes." 

Senate Joint Resolution/ 
Constitutional Amendment 76 
requires that a regulation or law 
directing a local unit of govern- 
ment to increase services in a way 
that increases co sts must receive a 
three-fifths vote in each chamber 
of the General Assembly or include 
funding to Implement the legisla- 
tion. Legislation that imposes fed- 
eral requirements without adding 
state requirements and legislation 
expanding the enforcement of 
criminal law would not be subject 
to this amendment 

"If a mandate isn't worth 
funding, legislators should seri- 
ously consider if it is worth 
imposing," said Geo-Karis. 

In order to appear on the 
ballot in November, the 
General Assembly will have to 
pass the measure by May 3. 



Jacobl said the shelter Is suc- 
cessful In placing animals. 

"We adopt out between 
1,000 to 2,000 animals a year," 
she said. "Cats are now more 
popular because they're lower 
maintenance." 

The shelter houses animals 
of all ages. "If they're not adopt- 
ed out they live here,* explained 
Jacobl. 

"The longest term resident 
was a dog who had been here 
four years," she said of Halston a 
7-year-old shepherd mix who 
wasn't good with kids and even- 
tually was adopted. 

One dog Jacob! said she 
thought would never be adopted 
eventually was taken home by a 
long-term supporter of the shel- 
ter. The dog was 14-years-oId 
and was arthritic. 

"She said she got tired of 
reading about Travel in the 
newsletter and didn't want him 
spending his last days In a shel- 
ter," Jacob! said of the woman 
who took Travel home. 

The current shelter is approxi- 
mately 4,500 square feet in size 
while the new structure will be 
around 20,000, according to JacobL 

"The building is costing 
about $1,400,000. It will be the 
largest no kill shelter in the 
Chicagoland area," she said. 

Operating the shelter isn't 
cheap. Jacob! estimated total 
daily costs at $1,000 to $1,500 a 
day.- The organization is sup- 
ported by a resale shop in Skokic 
which donates around $50,000 
to $60,000 a year to Save-A-Pet. 
She said the organization does a 
large amount of fund raising all 
year-long. Their largest event is 

an annual auction being hold at 

Chevy Chase Country Club May 
19. She said this event is so pop- 
ular it usually sells out of tickets 
needed to attend. 




1946 

A! and Wilma Schauf el 

Al and Wilma (nee Waara) Schaufcl of Lake 
Villa were married on March 1, 1946 in 
Kenosha, Wis. They will celebrate their golden 
anniversary on March 2 with an open house 
from 1 to 5 p.m. at St Mark Lutheran Church, 
1822 E Grand Ave., Lindenhurst 

During their 50 years of marriage they had 
nine children: Bill of Antioch; Stan of Kankakee, 
111.; Barb Brecst of Weyauwega, Wis.; Tom of 
Waukegan; Karen Barhyte of Trevor, Wis.; Jeff 
of Lake Villa; Vanessa Thomas of Round Lake; 
Jim of Round Lake; and Mary Garrison of 
Richmond. 

The Schaufcl's have 23 grandchildren. 

Al is retired from Ammco tools. 




1946 

John and Jean Zak 

John and Jean (nee Majkrzak) Zak of Bristol, 
Wis. were married on March 2, 1946 in Chicago. 
They will celebrate their golden anniversary on 
March 2 at The Country Squire Restaurant in 
Grayslakc, hosted by their children, with their 
family and friends. 

During their 50 years of marriage they had 
three children: John R. (Sharon) of West Bend, 
Wis.; Marie T. (Tom) LoCicero of Pleasant 
Prairie, Wis.; and Robert Z. (Beverly) of 
Mooresville, N.C 

The Zak's have 2 grandchildren. 

John retired from Baxter Travenoi, and Jean 
retired from Illinois Bell Telephone. 

The Zak's were residents of Center Lake, 
Wis. for 30 years, having moved to Bristol two 
years ago. They are members of St Peter 
Church in Antioch, where a Mass of celebration 
will be held March 2 at 8 a.m. They attribute 
the success of their marriage to lots of love, 
prayer, patience and perseverance. 




1 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Friday 



1 



9-11:30 Lindenhurst Early 
or 12:30-3 Childhood Center 
pre-school registra- 
tion. Call 356-2288 



Saturday 



Sunday 



Monday 



Tuesday 



9-11:30 Lindenhurst Early 
or 12:30-3 Childhood Center 
pre-school registra- 
tion. Call 356-2288 

9:30 a.m.- Antioch United 
2:30 p.m. Methodist Church 
holds Parents Day 
Out for infants to 5- 
year-olds. Call 395- 
1259 

7:30 p.m. Lindenhurst Park 
Dist. Board meets 



Wednesday 

9-11:30 Lindenhurst Early 
or 12:30-3 Childhood Center 
pre-school registra- 
tion. Call 356-2288 



*> * 



9-1 1 :30 Lindenhurst Early 
or 12:30-3 Childhood Center 
pre-school regis- 
tration. Call 356- 
2288 

7 p.m. Network of 

Friends, Multiple 
Sclerosis support 
group, meets at 
Antioch Moose 
Lodge 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Village 
Board meets 



Thursday 



7 p.m. 



Northern Lake 
County Qui Iter's 
Guild meets at State 
Bank of the Lakes, 
Lindenhurst 



9-1 1 :30 Lindenhurst Early 
or 12:30-3 Childhood Center 
pre-school registra- 
tion. Call.35 6-2288 

9:30 a.m.- Antioch United 
2:30 p.m. Methodist Church 
holds Parents Day 
Out for infants to 5- 
year-olds. Call 395- 
1259 



Coming Up: 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Jaycees 
meets on 
Thursday, March 
1 4 at Regency 
Inn, Rte. 173, 
Antioch. Call 
395-8035 



... ,., - ,. ., ■:: . ." ,; 



• fjjjfrjitmS; 










t • 



COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers MarcI. 1, 1996 



-SciENTificAUy SpEAkii\q 

Editor's note: The following three columns are written by students in Sharon Peterson's science class 

atAntioch Community High School, the class hopes to increase scientific literacy and share 

their ideas and knowledge in this monthly column. 

Irradiated foods: What does it mean? 



Harpke 



In the "Grolicr 
Encyclopedia, '95 CD 
Rom Edition," irradi- 
ated foods is defined 
as "foods that have 
been exposed to 
cobalt-60 radioactive 
isotopes which 

reduce or eliminate 
microorganisms, 
insects, and parasites 
that live on food." But 
is this process good 
for humans? Some experts say 
yes, while others say no. This 
explanation of the positives and 
negatives on irradiation of foods 
should help you with your own 
opinion on the issue. 

First, some groups think this 
process is good for human 
beings. They say that the process 
takes care of microorganisms, 
insects and parasites that might 
affect the human body by making 
it sick. Also, this process lowers 
the risk of buying spoiled food. 
Furthermore, health risks are 
reduced by not pesticizing the 
harvest of the foods. 



■VI 



In the "Groller 
Encyclopedia," under 
Food Preservation, it is 
stated that "this 
process, when using 
low levels of radiation, 
can kill off types of 
infestations, while if it 
was used at high lev- 
els, can literally steril- 
ize food." Some of the 
world thinks that this 
process is good 
because "over 20 countries in the 
world, including the United 
States, have approved this 
process," according to the 
"Grolicr Eneylopedia." Some 
foods that irradiation is used on 
include: fresh fish, shellfish, 
spices in Holland, potatoes, trop- 
ical fruits. 

In the United States, it is used 
on poultry to reduce the threat of 
salmonella This process increas- 
es the shelf-life of food, and helps 
to prevent the sprouting of 
onions and potatoes. It also 
destroys bacteria, mold and 
insects that may cat away at food. 



There arc experts, however, 
who think the use of radiation to 
clean food can be more harmful 
than good. Food irradiation caus- 
es the destruction of vitamins 
(such as Vitamin D), changes the 
form of proteins, and changes the 
taste, smell or texture of food. 
Also, there arc hard facts that 
state this process is safe. 

What If all the radiation is not 
dispersed? What if it causes more 
harm than good? More impor- 
tantly, what happens when the 
cobalt-60 isotopes disperses? Will 
we have enough room on earth to 
make sure all of the radioactivity 
In the leftover isotopes are prop- 
erly secured and will not cause 
any damage to anyone? 'Hi esc are 
questions that must be answered 
before irradiation of food 
becomes the norm. 

In conclusion, people all over 
the world have mixed reviews of 
the process. Who knows, maybe 
people will or will not accept this 
as well as they did with the 
microwave, canning, and freez- 
ing of foods. — by Josh Darpkc 



Irradiated foods: Not worth the risk 



The purpose of irradiating 
foods is to destroy microorgan- 
isms, which will make food last 
longer. This is done by exposing 
the food to cobalt-60 that is 
decaying. The decaying cobalt-60 
produces ionizing gamma radia- 
tion, which will penetrate the 
food and kill microbes and 

insects. In the '50s and '60s, 
research was done by different 
countries around the world to 
find out how to use this process 
to make food available to impov- 
erished, and underdeveloped 
countries. There were people 
afraid of nuclear radiation, so 
researchers were not sure the 
products would sell in the public 
marketplace. 

Their skepticism would all 
change on Jan. 25, 1992, in North 
Miami Beach, Fta when the first 
irradiated strawberries were sold. 
Over 1,000 pints were sold, 
despite the fact that they were 
more expensive than the regular 
strawberries that were sold right 
next to them. Irradiation of foods 
had been a success. Irradiating 
foods kills bacteria in foods and 



-PeopIe News 



also keeps them fresh- 
er longer. Besides 
killing bacteria, in 
both food preserva- 
tion, and surgical sup- 
plies, irradiation also 
Helps kill cancer. 

Surprisingly, there 
is no way to toll if food 

has been irradiated, 
and if you expose 
yourself to too much 
of the foods, harmful 
effects can occur. These include 
biological damage and death 
from exposure. Also genes can be 
damaged by radiation, and can 




Mitchell 



cause undesirable 
traits to offspring. 
These arc the two 
main reasons I would- 
n't cat irradiated 
foods. There is no rea- 
son to subject yourself 
to this kind of expo- 
sure Just to have foods 
that last longer. 

Irradiation of 
foods could be a good 
idea if it didn't have 
such harmful side effects. It 
would be great to be able to keep 
foods fresher longer.— by Liz 
Mitchell 



The Cosmetic Surgery Institute 



Ga Ida on dean's list 

David PaulGalda of Antioch 
was recognized for being includ- 
ed in the dean's list at Illinois 
State University in Normal. 

Marquette dean's list 

Elizabeth M. Sobczak and 
Amy M. Maodcrscheld, both of 
Antioch, made the dean's list for 
the fall 1995 semester at 
Marquette University in 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Breen joins Navy 

Jason Breen, son of Candi 
and Gary Brecn of Antioch, 
enlisted in the United States Navy 
for training at the Navy's 
Topcdoman's Mate School. He 
will report for active duty In 
September 1996, when he will 
undergo basic training at Great 
Lakes Naval Training Center. 



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Irradiated foods: 
Would you eat them? 

The concerns for Irradiated foods have existed many years. Some 
people think irradiation will lead to cancer later on in life, and some 
say they have no harmful effects. The use of 
high energy gamma rays (like x-rays) on food 
might sound strange, but is actually very 
helpful. When gamma rays arc used they kill 
insects in produce and spices, and pathogens 
such as salmonella in meat, poultry, and 
seafood. They also increase the storage life In 

products. 

Irradiated foods arc already processed 
overseas in Great Britain, Prance, the 
Netherlands, Israel, and South Africa. The 
main reason It is not in the United States is 
because of anti-irradiation campaigns lead Shipway 
by a number of many groups. But there 
seems to be no harmful side effects from irradiation. The FDA has 
done extensive testing on irradiation, and has found no mutations 
to the cells of the food. They have also done long term testing with 
no apparent side effects. 

I think that irradiation should be used more on the food in the 
United States to minimize the deaths caused by bacteria in food. 
Irradiation has already been used on food for military personnel, 
and astronauts, and shows no health effects. It Is also used on straw- 
berries, onions, tomatoes, citrus fruits, seasonings, and mush- 
rooms, which can be found in the United States. So next time you 
read a label, and it says Irradiated food, don't be frightened. Think 
of it as a way to stay safe, and healthy. — by Melissa Shipway 




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Marc!. 1, 1996 UIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY | .,,.,:■• 




Antioch Rotary 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

The Antioch Rotary Club Is 
not only International ,• but It is 
also worldwide on the super 
information highway. 

Rotarians worldwide can find 
out what's coming up or what's 
happening at the Antioch Rotary 
Club by connecting to the District 
6440 electronic bulletin board on 
the Internet. 

By having a district home 
page, members from Rotary clubs 
across the district can communi- 
cate with each other and browse 
through a district calendar. Each 
club in the district can post 
events on the district bulletin 

board. 

Doug Mather, systems opera- 
tor, said there arc more than 400 
different Rotary pages on the 
Internet from Taiwan to Antioch, 
but he said the Antioch club and 
other local clubs would be more 
interested in the District 6440 
bulletin board. 

"It's really nice' to be able to 
look at a district calendar to coor- 
dinate your fund-raising events, 
so they don't overlap with fund- 
raisers from other districts," 
Mather pointed out. 

He also said Rotary news from 
other districts across the world 
can be accessed similarly. Mather 
also said local clubs can lcam up- 
to-the-minute news of what is 
.happening at district confer- 
ences, too. 

"We've got a solid pipeline to 
bring information back into our 
district very quickly," Mather 

said. 

In addition, E-mail is avail- 
able and Rotary Club members 
can communicate or leave mes- 
sages for Rotary Club members 
from other towns. 

"In a way, it's like cheap 
advertisement," said Bob 
Schneider, an Antioch Rotary 
Club member. "Anyone who 
reads the bulletin board can find 

Meals-On-Wheels 
volunteers needed 

The Antioch Senior Center ur- 
gently needs volunteers to deliver 
meals to frail homebound senior 
citizens in the Antioch area. 
Volunteers report to the Antioch 
Senior Center shortly before 
noon and receive meals for deliv- 
ery within the community. 
Volunteers can sign up to deliver 
individually or as teams. 

Usually, community and 
church groups are formed into 
specific teams that each takes re- 
sponsibility for a particular route. 
Every community has a responsi- 
bility to take care of its own; this 
is an excellent way to give back to 
one's community. 

For more information contact 
Paul Howard at the Antioch Se- 
nior Center, 395-7120. 

r-WmTE Us-j 

Lakeland Newspapers 
wants to hear news of 
local sporting events, 
clubs, organizations, etc. 
Black and white photos 
are also welcome. Please 
send news items to 
Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. 
Whitney, Grayslake, 
60030 or call 223-81 61. 



out what's going on across the letin board, 

district" "I never talked to him," 

He went to add that he Schneider said. "Wc just left mes- 

arranged for Mather to speak sages for each other through E- 

beforc the Antioch Rotary Club mall." 

via E-mail messages on thS bul- For access to the Rotary Club 



District 6440 computer bulletin 
board, call (815) 337-0279 on 
computer. Club events can also 
be faxed to Mather at (815) 338- 
3003. 

• In other Rotary news, Homer 



and Frances LaPlant bequested a 
sizable sum of money to the 
Antioch Rotary Club to be 
deposited in its scholarship fund. 
Homer LaPlant was a lifelong res- 
ident of Antioch. 




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I 

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Donation 



From page Al 

and on Saturday, he was up and 
about without taking any more 
pain killers. 

"I had very little discomfort 
and very little disruption to my 
normal routine," said Axton, who 
heads one of the town's three 
banks and who is active in several 
service organizations. 

Ironically, the only discomfort 
Axton experienced came when he 
threw his back out after laying in 
bed too long on Friday. 

"There's no reason not to 
become a bone marrow donor," 
Axton declares. "I encourage odier 
folks to do it. Just think how much 
you would appreciate It if you had 
a son, a daughter, a wife or a moth- 
er who needed a transplant." 

Bone marrow transplants are 
done for people suffering from 
leukemia or anemia. Both arc 
deadly diseases that weaken one's 
immune system and ability to fight 
off disease or viruses. 

Six years ago Axton as well as 
others from the Antioch Rotary 
Club volunteered to offer a sample 
of their white blood for screening. 

Unlike typical red blood dona- 
tions, white blood donations arc 
carefully screened. A close genetic 
match is necessary for a successful 
bone marrow transplant. The 
chances for a good match arc 1 in 
20,000 for non-family recipients. 
Siblings, such as brothers and sis- 



Prevent 



ters, have a 30 to 40 percent 
chance to match with another 
brother or sister. 

Axton's blood screening was 
entered into a national registry. "At 
any one time, there arc 2,000 
active searches going on," Axton 
noted. 

Six years later, Axton was noti- 
fied his blood matched a 34-ycar- 
old woman who was being treated 
for leukemia in Philadelphia. 

Essentially, the bone marrow 
contains the material needed to 
ward off diseases. Someone with 
leukemia, however, may need a 
transplant in order to produce 
healthy white blood cells. 

Axton underwent additional 
screening and testing before being 
scheduled to be "harvested" Feb. 
8. Weeks before the surgery, Axton 
limited his contact with sick peo- 
ple as much as possible, for any 
sickness he would get would be 
transferred to the woman. 

Before accepting Axton's mar- 
row, the woman had to undergo 
massive chemotherapy and radia- 
tion treatments called "condition- 
ing" to kill all of her bone marrow. 
"Her immune system was 
totally destroyed. She had to live in 
complete isolation for a week," 
Axton pointed out. "A bone mar- 
row recipient has to make a life 
and death decision to go through 
die conditioning." 

At the same time, "There's no 



obligation at any time that I have 
to follow through with the proce- 
dure. It's strictly volunteer," Axton 
said. 

Immediately after Axton's 
surgery, a volunteer raced his mar- 
row to Chicago's O'Harc Airport to 
fly the marrow to Philadelphia 
within 12 hours. 

The woman received the mar- 
row, but will remain In isolation 
for up to .six weeks because the 
body can accept Axton's marrow, 
reject the marrow, or the marrow 
can reject the body. There is a 50 to 
75 percent success rate. 

Furthermore, the cost to the 
donor is almost nil as the initial 
screening costs between $40 to 
$50, which is often offset by gov- 
ernment grants or charity organi- 
zations. 

"This community seizes the 
opportunity to help people out, but 
seldom docs someone have an 
opportunity to save another per- 
son's life," said Axton, explaining his 
reason for following through with 
the procedure. 'To me it was a mat- 
ter of really helping someone." 

Axton is still waiting to hear 
how the woman's body accepted 
his marrow. In the meantime, he 
wrote a small note to her describ- 
ing who he was. 

"1 warned her that if she starts 
wearing wing-tipped shoes, tics 
and begins to shave, she might be 
in trouble," Axton said. 



From page Al 

wc could have had a lot of serious 

injuries," said Captain Rich 

Frankson of the Antioch Fire 

Department "If they didn't go off, 

we would have had some bodies." 

Because oftha age of the build- 
ing, a sprinkler system was never 

installed into die building. But 
Frankson said sprinkler systems 
are not necessarily life-saving 
devises. He said they are designed 
to limit fire damage to a structure. 
In addition, the fire alarm sys- 
tem in the building was directly 
wired to the dispatch system at 
the Antioch Police Department 
On-duty police officers Sergeant 
jim Hcssion and Officer lim Ruth 
were on the scene in less than a 
minute when the fire dispatch 
first came through at approxi- 



mately 10:05 p.m. 

According to Frankson, the two 
officers immediately advised an 
elderly couple not to use the door 
to escape. Rather, the officers 
assisted them through a ground- 
floor window. 

*"7Jio two patrolman prevented 

two people from going out the 
frontdoor," Frankson said "If they 
would have walked out the apart- 
ment door, they would have per- 
ished. They're responsible for sav- 
ing two lives." 

Deputy Chief Charles Watkins 
of the Antioch Police Department 
also praised the two officers for 
taking control of the situation and 
gathering potential witnesses. 

"They also contained the wit- 
nesses into one area, so we could 
begin interviewing immediately," 



Watkins said. "When I got there, 
everything was under control." 

Subsequently, police detectives 
George Brocckcr and Craig 
Somcrvillc were able to gather 
enough evidence to charge Rachacl 
Hopkins, 22, of Antioch, with 

aggravated arson. 

Upon numerous interviews, It 
was learned Hopkins started the 
fire in an attempt to commit sui- 
cide. The fire spread, and she could 
not extinguish die fire, police said. 
She was remanded to Lake County 
Jail on $250,000 bond. 

The fire has left the three-story 
building uninhabitable, but none 
of the families living in 11 of the 12 
apartments were seriously injured. 

"If hadn't been for the smoke 
detectors, there could have been 
some casualties," Watkins said. 



Arson 



From page Al 

her third floor apartment while 
she went to the basement, 
Watkins said. 

The fire apparently spread out 
of control and Hopkins raced to 
her apartment to call 911. She 
told police she had seen two male 
subjects, one of which she said 
lived in the building, exit the 
building at about the same time 
the fire started. 

Far the next 22 hours, detec- 
tives Brocckcr and Somcrvillc 
scrutinized the crime scene and 
interviewed residents living in 
the apartment building and adja- 
cent buildings. 

"She had originally given us 
this story of several guys running 
out the door," Broecker said. 

The alibi of the former tenant 
Hopkins reported leaving the 
scene checked out, and police 
asked her to return for more 
interviewing. 

"She started back tracking on 
her story. She had a lot of loop- 
holes," Broecker said. "After sev- 
eral hours of interviewing, she 



"V)„^.. 



admitted to starting the fire." 

From the start, police were 
led to believe the fire was inten- 
tionally set by someone who 
lived in the building, and Illinois 
Fire Marshal Mitch Kushner 
determined the origin in the stor- 
age room. 

"The origin was in an area 
where there was no reason for a 
fire to start on its own," Watkins 
said. 

Brocckcr said the storage 
area was reportedly locked at 
9:30 p.m., and the door frame to 
the storage area did not appear 
damaged by a break-in. Only 
residents living in the building 
had keys to access the storage 
area. 

"That was another Indicator it 
had to be somebody who lived In 
the building," Brocckcr said. , 

Watkins praised the persis- 
tent efforts of Brocckcr and 
Somcrvillc for interviewing and 
re-interviewing potential sus- 
pects. 

"In crimes of this nature 
when the evidence is sketchy by a 



fire, it's imperative that you have 
an idea who did it within 4a 
hours," Watkins said. "They 
worked around the clock for two 
and a half days. They did a won- 
derful job." 

Hopkins is being held on a 
$250,000 bond in Lake County 
Jail. 




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Staff Reporter 

When it comes to matching a bone marrow donor with a 
bone marrow recipient, the numbers arc startling. . 

Ted Axton, president of the First National Bank of Antioch, 
just completed the surgery necessary to donate his bone mar- | 
row to a 34-ycar-bld woman being troated for leukemia In 
Philadelphia. ! 

He said his procedure was painless. He was capable of run- 
ning errands the following day. 

Axton encourages more people to have their white blood 
tested for a possible bone marrow donation because the num- 
bers for the recipients arc astronomical. Moiro donors simply 
better the odds for the patients, he said. 

Unlike red blood which Is relatively easy to transfer between 
people, bone marrow requires a close genetic and DNArnatcri 

The chances for a match are Tin 20,000 for people who are 
not family members. 

Axton rattled off some numbers supplied by the National 
Marrow Donor Program. v * 

In 19fl5, there were 118 million donors and 4,000 successful 
transplants. 

"At any one time, there are 2,000 searches going on," Axton 
said. . 

With 2,000 searches going on and a 1 In 20,000 chance of 
finding a match, Axtori noted, "To make it an even chance?of , 
finding someone who matches, you would need 40 million 
donors in the national registry." 
r v- He encourages individuals to have their white blood 
screened and he encourages service organizations to have their 
members screened, Axton had his blood tested as part of 
Antioch Rotary Club project Service organizations can also help 
raise money to fund the screening which costs about $50 per 
person. 

"There's never been a fatality of a donor," Axton said. "I've 
done it and now I'm encouraging other folks to do It" 



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THIStyEEK 

Simply the best 

Boys basketball All- 
Conference Team named 
PAGE Al 5 

Athlete of the 
Week 

WresUer Matt Hlinak, 
eager Kevin EckoistaJiler 
are honored 
PAGEA12 

For More 

SpbRTS/LEISURE 

See Paqe C22 



M*«th 1, 1996 UltElANd r^EwspA W rs COMMUNITY 




'ate 




a 



owerin 
eerunch 



'E PETERSON 



■ 



I ■ CJ 



flSjtaff Reporter 

giooking at the Loyola 
^^demy girls basketball ros- 
|p^and watching the 
gamblers only once, hun- 
dreds at Maine West's supcr- 
^sectional believed the squad 
ha|% bright future, 
gllicy have the future, 
jBt we have the present," 
evenson Coach Frank 
attuccisaid. 
The celebration was in 
1 gear from me folks from 
colnshire, who had just 
tched their team gain a 
me-from-bchind 67-62 
^rtn. With the win, the Pats 
avc a chance to defend their 
ate title and No. I ranking. 
31-1 team, they battle 30-1 
aris in the quarterfinal clash 
|at 10:30 am. March 1 at 
Illinois State Uiiiverslty. 

Defense and scoring by 
TaujaCatchings (35 points) 
and timely three-pointers by} 
Trish DeClaric powered these- 
Pats to the return trip. 
Catchings was even 
strong from the free-throw 
line, where she was 13-of-16. 
Her 35 points topped her 
season average and came 
withm one pomt of tying the 
school record, for one game 
set by Tina Stops. 

"I had about 80 
turnovers; But I was pleased > ; : 
with making the freethrows;" 
Catdiings said. /'■'. / : v \ ; .V . : ; , 

Stevenson's wake-up call 
came with 3:45 left in the 
third period. Down 47^36, the 
Patriots began to get serious , 
with three-quarter court 
pressure against Loyola. 
Catchings keyed, the pressure 
on top, resulting In turnovers 
or later intercepted passes. 
"I just shoot when I am 
open and was hitting them," 
DeClarksaid, 

Catchings converted a 
steal into a layup for SHS's 
lead It would take to Normal, 
54-52 With just over five min- 
utes left. She tipped in a miss 
for a four-point lead and '■;., 
made four clutch free throws 
to thwart a Rambler come- 
back, vl 



- ' ' -■ " - • 



Jr. Sequoit teams 




,i 



It was a clean sweep for the Antioch 
Youth basketball program as the 6th, 7th and 
8th graders won nine games of nine played 
for the week. 

Opponents included teams from Lake 
Zurich, Mundelein and Carmel. The 6th 
graders upped their season record to 7-2, 
including a 47-27 victory over Mundelein. 
Chris Kocinski led the Antioch effort with 12 
points, teammate Shawn Schulcr adding 11. 
Josh Bonner contributed six points, while 
Ryan Callahan, Andrew Kinney and Kevin 
Pendergrast tallied four each. 

Bonner also led the campaign in the 
paint, along with Kinney, Kocinski and Drew 
Pctkus. 

Against Lake Zurich, the contest was 
close for three quarters before pressure 
defense and solid rebounding allowed 
Antioch to pull away to a 44-31 win. Kocinski 



again led the Jr. Sequoit offense, tallying 20 
points to go with 1 1 rebounds. Bonner and 
Pcndergast added five apiece in the scoring 
column. 

Antioch then hosted Carmel, coming 
away with a 53-22 win. Antioch raced to a 30- 
11 lead at halrtime, due mainly to sound 
defense — the Jr. Sequoits tallied 11 steals in 
the game, Finkclburg grabbing four and 
Schuler snagging three. Once again, 
Kocinski's 199 points led Antioch scorers. 
Finkclburg and Brian Walsh dropped in eight 
points each, with Schuler, Callahn, Kinney 
and McHaffey scoring four each. 

After losing the first four games of the 
season, the 7th graders have rebounded to an 
8-5 mark. Lake Zurich was one of the more 
recent victims, with Antioch guard Justin 
Kent pacing the 53-45 Sequoit win with an 18- 
point performance. 



-for-nine 

Center Scott Hodina added 12 points, 
while guard Ari Brown added eight more. 

Leading by three points at halftime, the 
Jr. Sequoits went on an offensive tear in the 
third stanza, racking up 18 points. 
Kent, Brown, Brandon White, Eric Langner, 
Tom Davis and Brad Cromcans led the stingy 
Antioch defense, while Eric White fought for 
eight rebounds. 

The winning continued against 
Mundelein, though the Jr. Sequoits had to 
overcome a 14-point deficit in the fourth quar- 
ter. Solid defense and 12 fourth-quarter points 
by Eric White — including a lay-up with only 
seconds remaining. White ended the contest 
with 19 points, while Hodina added 1 1 markers 
.and nine rebounds. Mark Purneii, Mike 
Perrone, Rob Lodesky, Brown, and Brandon 
White added some heat on defense. 
See SEQUOITS page A13 



SPORTS 



Nine Lake Villa grapplers 
earn regional titles 



Led by nine champions, the 
Lake Villa Lancers wrestling team 
looked sharp at Saturday's 
Illinois Kids Wrestling Federation 
regional tournament, held at. 
Waukcgan West High School. 

The Lancers ran away with the 
senior division team tide, outdis- 
tancing the second-place 
Grayslakc Wrestling Factoryl45.5- 
55. The Lancers also took second 
in the novice division, Lake Zurich 
edging the Lake Villa squad 108- 
95. 

Coached by Alex Barbour, the 
Lancers won their second consec- 
utive Northwest Suburban Grade 
School Conference title last week, 
finished first in the Round Lake 
Team Tournament and finished 
the season with a 9-1 dual meet 
record. The only loss came at the 
hands of the defending state 
champs from Stanton Jr. High. 

Four Lancers won their second 
regional title on Saturday. Ryan 
Hlinak, third at last year's state 
tournament in the 79-pound 
bracket and 40-0 in the current 
campaign, won the 89-pound divi- 
sion senior championship.Two- 
time state qualifiers Bob Grasser 
and Mark Stewart took first-place 
honors at 95 and 101 pounds, 
respectively, while Andy Hamelet 
took his second regional tide, this 
one at 122 pounds. 



Kiwanis champs in Lindenhurst 
Police Basketball league 

The Kiwanis of Lindenhurst are the champions for the Lindenhurst 
Police Basketball League. The Kiwanis defeated the Lake Villa 
Township Lions Club in the championship game, 50-43. 

Leading scorer for the Kiwanis was Tom Purnell with 18 points. 
Brian Berg led the Lions with 15 points. 

Anderson Tile met Lindenfest in the consolation game with 
Anderson Tile taking third place in the league with a 52-46 win. 

Leading scorer for Anderson Tile was Charlie Reynolds with 18 
points. Tom Marks led Lindenfest with 24 points. 

"We had a great turn-out for the championship games," said David 
Erickson. "We followed the game with our awards banquet were 
plaques were given to the coaches and sponsors," 

The All-Star Team will play the league coaches, March 1 at B.J. 
Hooper School beginning at 7 p.m. 

The All-Star Team will also challenge the Maine Township AU-Star 
Team at the Maine Township Community Center, March 8. 

Sponsors and coaches in the volunteer league are: 

North Star Travel- coach Bill Prosise 

Aristocrat Shoe Repair— coaches Dave Grana, Joe D'Antonio 

McDonalds of Lindenhurst— coach Keith Schmitt 
See KIWANIS page A12, 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Three other Lancers also won 
senior division championships. 
Christian Chebny, a returning 
state qualifier, took the tide in the 
70-pound bracket, while team- 
mates Sean Stewart and Eric 
Peterson won championships at 
79 and 108 pounds, respectively. 

Novice division champs from 
the Lake Villa club included Steve 
Oliver at 108 and 1995 state qual- 
ifier Justin Sccdhpff earning the 
gold medal at 166. " 

In addition to these champs, 
nine other Lancers qualified for 
sectional competition. They are: 
Ryan Overby (2nd, 66 lbs., 
junior); Justin Bigalkc (2nd, 62 
lbs., novice); Ryan Schuster (2nd, 
66 lbs., novice); Brian Backe (2nd, 
84 lbs., novice); Allen Boyes (2nd, 
101 lbs., novice); Joe Young (2nd, 
95 lbs., senior); Adam Schuster 
(2nd, 108 lbs., senior); Sean 
Moyer (3rd, 147 lbs., senior); and 
Ryan Meyers (4th, 95 lbs., senior). 

Two novice wrestlers, John 
Douglas and Joey Lihdeman, 
wrestled well but failed to qualify 
for the sectional meet 

The Lancers look to improve 
on last year's second-place finish 
at sectionals. On Mar. 5 they wres- 
tle a dual meet at Big Hollow, then 
move on to the IKWF State 
Tournament at The Mark of the 
Quad Cities in Moline on Mar. 8-9. 



WCW comes to town 

World Championship Wrestler Road Warrior Hawk made a 
stop at the Great Lakes Naval Training this past weekend in a 
performance of world championship wrestlers. Lake Villa fan 
Shannon Michael was one of many who had an opportunity 
to meet Hawk after the match. 



Lake Villa Ttop. baseball player ratings 

A reminder to all Lake Villa Township baseball players in the Pinto, 
Mustang, Bronco, and Pony levels that in-house player rating days will 
be held at Antioch High School on Sunday, ^March 3 and Sunday, 
March 10. Players should plan to attend one^bfthe two scheduled rat- 
ings days. Players should bring their gloves and must wear tennis shoes 
to the ratings. 

The schedule is as follows: Pinto, 2 to 4 p.ni, Sunday, March 3, last 
name A through K; 7 and 8 year olds, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sunday, March 
10, last name L through Z; Mustang, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sunday, March 
3, last name A through K; and 9 and 10 year olds, 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, 
March 10, last name L through Z. 

Also, Bronco, 2 to 4 p.m., Sunday, March 3, last name A through K; 
11 and 12 year olds, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sunday, March 10, last name L 
through Z; Pony 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sunday, March 3, last name A 
through K; 13 and 14 year olds, 2 to 4 p.m., Sunday, March 10, last 
name L through Z. 

Players need to attend only one in-house rating session. Try to 
attend by alphabet, but go when you can. A limited number of open- 
ings still exist in all the leagues. League representatives will be on hand 
for registrations. 




! 



m 



— < 




COMMUNITY UIceIancJ NewspApcRs MAitch 1, 1996 







St 



!!4|llllli| *—^*^— 



u3 ansa 

A MS 



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> v :i \ f 




Athlete of the Week 

Matt Hlinak of the Antioch Sequoits wrestling team was 
named Athlete of the Week by First Chicago Bank/Thelen 
Sand and Gravel. Hlinak, a conference and regional champi- 
on, qualified for the IHSA state finals in Champaign. With 
Hlinak, center, are Supt. Dennis Hockney, left, and Amy 
Krueger of the First National Bank of Chicago — Antioch. 
First National Bank of Chicago — Antioch and Thelen Sand 
and Gravel will make a donation to the Antioch Hich School 
scholarship fund in Hlinak's name for his outstanding efforts. 




Athlete of the Week 

Kevin Eckenstahler of the Antioch Sequoits basketball team 
was named Athlete of the Week by First Chicago 
Bank/Thelen Sand and Gravel. Hlinak has been the Sequoits 
go-to man under the basket all season. With Hlinak, center, 
are Supt., Dennis Hockney, left, and Amy Krueger of the First 
National Bank of Chicago — Antioch, right. First National 
Bank of Chicago — Antioch and Thelen Sand and Gravel will 
make a donation to the Antioch Hich School scholarship 
fund in Eckenstahler's name for his outstanding efforts. 



THE NEW AREA CODE FOR OUR AREA IS (047) 



AUTOMATED 
AUTO LOANS 



NWSC names All-Academic team 



The Northwest Suburban 
Conference has announced Us winter 
sports All-Academic Teams for 1995-96. 

These learns arc Intended to honor 
athletes who also excel as students. 
Teams arc chosen for boys and glris 
basketball, wrestling, bowling, checr- 
Icadlng and pompons. Listing below 
indicate the player, grade point average 
(GPA), school and class. 

• Boys basketball 
First team 

Aaron Clark, 4.0 GPA, Grayslakc, 
junior. 

Luke Kron, 4.0 GPA, Grayslakc, 

senior. 

Chris Wirsing, 4.0 GPA, Grayslakc, 



junior. 
Todd 



4.0 GPA, 




Mikcllonis, 
johnsburg, Junior. 

Trent Fisher, 4.0 GPA, Johnsburg, 
Junior. 

Joseph Rockers, 4.00 GPA, Marian 
Central, junior. 

Thomas Longlcy, 4.0 GPA, Round 
Lake, junior. 

Dave Martin, 3.9S GPA, Grant, 
senior. 

Rob Kucik, 3.81 GPA, Johnsburg. 
junior. 

Lewis Miskowicz, 3.80 GPA, Marian 
Central, senior. 

Tait Scnnett, 3.78 GPA, Johnsburg, 
junior. 

Ben Phillips, 3.7B GPA, Marian 
Central, senior. 
Honorable mention 

Barry Grabcrt, Grayslakc; 

Christopher Wcigand, Round Lake; 

Steve Wclton, Wauconda; Jason Stalely, 

Johnsburg; Dan Uu mu, Grayslakc; Brad 

Raysby, Round Lake; Matt Schweitzer, 

Johnsburg; Pat Smiih, Marian Central; 

John Werner, Wauconda; John 

Dunlavy, Grant; Scott tanners, Grant; ' 

Dallas Bowers, Round Lake; John 

Stockwcll, Round Lake; Mike Irvin, 

Johnsburg; James Mack, Marian 

Central; Bill Dcvoy, Johnsburg Mike 

Bcmdt, Marian Central; Justin 

Swanson, Johnsburg; Jose Casanova, 

Grayslakc; Steve Rczmcr, Grayslakc; 

Ray Portcn, Wauconda; Malt Pcschke, 

GniysJakc; Joe Ellen, Marian Central 

• Girls basketball 
First team 

Linnac Johnson, 4.0 GPA, Grant, 
senior. 

Kalhryn Owens, 4.0 GPA, Grant, 
junior. 

Kim Villigcr, 4.0 GPA, Grant, senior. 

Michelle Tennyson, 4.0 GPA, Grant, 



junior. 

Dana Dorr, 4.0 GPA, Grayslakc, 
senior. 

Katie Shine, 4.0 GPA, 
Johnsburg,scnlor. 

Lisa Stilling, 4.0 GPA, Marian 
Central, senior. 

Jennifer 1-aplanlc, 4.0 GPA, Marian 
Central, senior. ' 

Jamie D'Andrca, 4.0 GPA, Round 
lake, senior. 

Melissa Whitman, 4.0 GPA, 
Wauconda, senior. 

Sarah Yoho,4.0 GPA, Wauconda, 
senior. 

Kelly Ryberg, 4.0 GPA, Wauconda, 
Junior. 
Honorable mention 

Brittany Lund, Round lake; Kristcn 
Miner, Grayslakc; Sandy Sneyd, 
Grayslakc; Angic Fchting, Johnsburg; 
Jessica Abramavicius, Marian Central; 
Anne Robinson, Round Lake; Shannon 
Fricllonc, Grayslakc; Colleen Joyce, 
Johnsburg; Abhcy Newman, Grant; 
Shcrri Nccsc, Marian Central;' Amanda 
Rodriguez, Round Lake; Amy Brin, 
Marian Central; Hannah Frank, 
Grayslakc; Trish Hadick, Marian 
Central; Kelly Dehn, Marian Central; 
Stacte Morlcy, Grant; Christa 
Hcffcman, Marian Central; Trlcla 
Larkin, marian Central; Shannon 
Gaitsch, Wauconda; Andrea Jadrich, 
Round Lake; Shelly Dictz, Grant; Robyn 
Boydston, Graylsakc; Megan Mirs, 
Johnsburg; Shelly Schrocdcr, 
Johnsburg; Tonya Hopkins, Round 
Lake; Hence Bailey, Wauconda; Katie 
Hurckcs, Johnsburg; Elizabeth Schaffer, 
Marian Central; Kcrri McBvoy, 
Johnsburg; Theresa Stanley, 
Wauconda; Angela Wiszowaty, Round 
Lake; Lindsay Nustra, Wauconda; 
Rachel Denis, Johnsburg; Katrin 
Humphrey, Round Lake; Andrea 
Strmic, Wauconda. 



Bowling 
First team 

KaUc Hcigcl, 4.0 GPA, Grant, Junior. 

Jen Koll, 4.0 GPA, Grayslakc, junior. 

Kristcn Hascnjagcr, 3.98 GPA, 
Grant, senior. 

Jackie Graham, 3.91 GPA, 
Grayslakc, junior. 

Amy Hcinrikson, 3.87 GPA, Grant, 
junior. 
Honorable mention 

Brcanna Frcy, Grant; Chcric 
Rlandford, Grant; Lori Davidson, Grant; 
Robin Fen rich, Grant; Courtney Co well, 
Grant; Kristin Sieger, Grayslakc; Kristy 
Disch, Grayslakc, 

• Wrestling 
First team 

Joe BIgalkc, 4.0 GPA, Grant, junior. 

Bob Dobbcrtin,4.0 GPA, Johnsburg, 
senior. 

Joey D'Andrca, 4.0 GPA, Round 
Like, senior. 

Christopher Bell, 4.0 GPA, Round 
Lake, junior. 

Mark Cobb,3.9B GPA,Grant, senior. 

Dane Gyllin, 3.97 GPA, Round Lake, 
sophomore. 

Kurt Rohlwing, 3.88 GPA, 
Wauconda, senior. 

Bandy Vcndcgna, 3.80 GPA, 
Johnsburg, junior. 

Warner Russell, 3.73 GPA, 
Wauconda, sophomore. 

Jim Westfall. 3.70 GPA, Marian 
Central, junior. 

Nick Guderyahn, 3.65 GPA, Marian 
Central, sophomore. 

Jeremy Shaver, 3.58 GPA, 
Wauconda, sophomore. 

Matt Shelley, 3.57 GPA, Grant, 
junior. 

Bill Morkes, 3.56 GPA, Marian 
Central, sophomore. 

Joseph M. Miller, 3.44 GPA, Round 
Lake, senior. 



Kiwanis 



From page All 

I jndenhurst Travel- coach Bob Warrender 

Kiwanis Club of Lindcnhurst— coach John Williams 

lindenfest- coaches George and Jim Gilliland 

Jacobscn Excavating- coaches Dennis Carrol, Bob Parker 

Lake Villa Township Lions- coaches Jeff Theis, David Erickson 

Eagle Country Market— coaches John Miller, Brian Busch 

Anderson Tiler- coaches Mike Fasano, Jim Gray 

Throughout the season the Lake Villa Township Football League 

donated their portable scoreboard for use during each game. 



JOHN DEERE 



ISTO PAYMENTS 
"NO INTEREST 

until Oct- 1, 1996 



This summer, work on the lawn, 

not the budget 

Get a State-of-the-art New John Deere Garden Tractor that takes the work out of lawn care. And 
during our Deere Season Sale, our low interest rates make them litrJe work to own. 



345 Cardan Tractor ■ IH lit'- 
54" Mower-Power SlMrin% 






IMPLEMENT 
COMPANY I 

OUTSTANDING C USTOMER SERVICE SINCF 1993 

HY. 83, 5 Ml. NORTH OF ANTIOCH 

SALEM, Wl»41 4-843-2326 • HOURS 8-5 MON.-SAT. 

'Subject la approved cedil. ICt donnpaymenl teqaiied. A UM per immlli M Ma tn»„, t „...„ .._ .„„/,„, ,„ 
mpaid balance. Olbe, ,p,cmt rale, ami term, available. Selected madeh only. Fa, non-commercial me only. Otter end, 
June 30, 1996. * 



■.• man . .- -,.■-_- ....; 




Mabch 1, 1 996 ■ UkflANd Ncws P a P crs COMMUNITY 



Boys IceIess Hockey 




lesultA of Feb, 24-26 
•ntral DIv. Grades 1- 



inplclcafs 

ifolvcs 

cdwings 

lars 

lackhawks 

lues 

larthstars 



w 

6 
5 
3 
3 
1 
1 





L 


1 
1 
2 
2 
4 
5 
5 



T 



2 

1 
3 
1 


1 

T 



I 



1 









' 






6 



iciflc DIv. Grades 1-2 

W L 

Ings 6 

talcs 5 • 1 

ick.s 3 2 

Icrs 3 3 

jmtcks 3 3 

larks 1 4 

[als 1 5 

imcs S 

llantic DIv. Grades 1-2 

W L T 

Imirals 5 1 

tngcrs 5 10 

[clones 4 2 

Panthers 4 2 

,;0>TFS 3 3 

'■■:- Islanders 14 1 

.;. Cap Hals 15 

;'tighlning 5 1 

'Northeast DIv. Grades 1-2 

J Penguins 5 1 

Devils 5 10 

'Thunder 4 1 1 

Canadicns 4 2 

. Whalers 2 3 1 

:';Sabrcs 1 5 

.'Bruins 15 

v Nordiques 15 

.Results 

'Kings 9, Canucks 4 
i* Devils 6, Whalers 2 
;. Jots 9, Maplelcafs L 
aPyers 9, Islanders 1 
.•.Oilers fl, Flames 3 
' .Thunder 10, Nordiques 2 
, Rowings 4, Blackhawks 2 
Admirals 3, Capitals 
Blues 7, Northstars 4 
Penguins 7, Bruins 
Ducks 5, Seals 2 
t- Panthers 7, Cyclones 5 
Eagles 6, Sharks 4 
. Canadicns fl, Sabres 3 
Stars 3, Wolves 3 
Bangers 5, Lightning 2 
{Rangers 6, Islanders 3 
[Stars 3, Northstars 3 
[Bruins 5, Devils 7 
•Ducks 7, Canucks 
i Flyers 5 f Lightning 3 
[Wolves 3, Blues I 
Thunder B, Sahrcs 3 
[ Flames 4, Sharks 2 
Cyclones G, Capitals 1 
lets 12, Blackhawks 2 
Penguins 5, Whalers 2 
Kings 7, Seals 3 
Admirals 9, Panthers 1 
Maplelcafs 6, Redwings 2 
Canadicns 9. Nordiques 5 
Ragles G. Oilers 5 
Central DIv. Grades 3-4 



Blues 

Stars 

Wolves 

Blackhawks 

lets 

Hcdwings 

Road runners 

Northstars 

Maplelcafs 



W 

6 
5 
5 
5 
3 
2 
2 
2 




L 

1 

1 
2 
3 
5 
5 
6 
7 



Pacific DIv. Grades 3-4 



Canucks 

Oilers 

Seals 

Kings 

Ducks 

Flames 

Sharks 

Eagles 

Blades 



W 

6 
5 
5 
5 
4 
3 
•3 





L 

2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
7 
7 



T 


2 
I 

1 





T 







1 

1 







Atlantic DIv. Grades 3-4 



Flyers 

Panthers 

Admirals 

Capitals 

Generals 

Cyclones 

Islanders 

Lightning 

Rangers 



W 

7 
7 
5 
4 
3 
2 

1 

1 

1 



L 



3 
3 
3 
4 
6 
6 
6 



T 






1 

1 







Pts. 

12 

10 



7 

5 

3 

2 

1 

Pis. 

12 

10 

7 

6 

6 

3 

2 

2 

Pts. 

10 
10 

(I 

B 

6 
3 
2 
1 

10 

10 

9 

B 

5 

2 

2 

2 



Northeast DIv. Grades 3-4 

Penguins 7 1 

Canadicns 5 2 
Whalers 3 3 1 

Thunder 2 2 3 

Senators 2 2 3 

Nordiques 2 3 2 

Sabres 2 3 2 

Devils 1 5 1 

Bruins 1 5 1 

Results 

Canadicns 5, Nordiques 1 
Seals 7, Blades 5 
Nordiques 1. Senators 1 
Blackhawks 5, Redwings 3 
Sabres 2, Thunder 2 



Pts. 

12 
12 
11 

10 

7 

4 

4 

4 



Pts. 

12 

10 

10 

10 

8 

7 

7 





Pts. 

14 

14 

10 

B 

7 

5 

2 

2 

2 

15 

10 

7 

7 

7 

6 

6 

3 

3 



Stars 5, Jets 5 
Penguins 5, Whalers 1 
Sharks 5, Blades 4 
Flyers 0, Islanders 3 
Kings 8, Eagles 2 
Panthers 6, Lightning 
Ducks 7, Eagles 1 
Admirals 4, Generals 1 
Flames 5, Sharks 5 
Senators 7, Devils 2 
Roadrunncrs 9, Northstars 3 
Thunder 3, Bruins 2 
Canucks 9, Oilers 5 
Central DIv. Grades 5-8 

W L T 
Maplelcafs 6 2 

Blues 6 2 

lets 5 3 

Blackhawks 4 4 
Wolves 3 5 

Stars 3 5 

Northstars 2 6 

Redwings 1 7 

Pacific DIv. Grades 5-6 

W L T 
Ducks 7 1 

Flames 7 10 

Canucks 5 2 1 

Sharks 4 3 1 

Seals 4 3 1 

Oilers 3 3 2 

Eagles 17 

Kings 8 

Atlantic DIv. Grades 5-6 
Rangers 8 

Panthers 6 2 

Capitals 5 2 1 

Islanders 3 4 1 

Admirals 3 5 

Lightning 3 5 

Flyers 2 6 

Cyclones B 

Northeast DIv. Grades 5-8 
Sabres 7 1 

Canadicns 5 12 

Devils 4 3 1 

Bruins 4 3 1 

Thunder 3 3 2 

Penguins 14 3 

Whalers 2 5 1 

Nordiques 15 2* 

Results 

Maplelcafs 4, Jets 2 
Rangers 2, Lightning 1 
Canucks 8, Kings 2 
Devils 5, Whalers 3 
Blackhawks 6. Redwings 
Bniins 6, Penguins 4 
Flames 4, Oilers 1 
Sabres 7, Canadians 
Ducks 5, Seals 4 
Capitals 9, Admirals 1 
Blues 1, Northstars 
Flyers 3, Islanders 3 
Stars 2, Wolves 1 
Thunder 6, Nordiques 2 
Sharks 4, Eagles 2 
Panthers 8, Cyclones 
Penguins 2, Whalers 2 
Blues 5, Wolves 1 
Rangers 8, Islanders 1 
Stars 2, Northstars 1 
Sabres 1, Thunder 1 
Flames 4. Sharks 1 
Bruins 3, Devils 3 
Jets G, Blackhawks 3 
Lightning 4, Flyers 2 
Ducks 6, Canucks 
Panthers 3, Admirals 1 
Oilers 0, Eagles 4 
Capitals 6, Cyclones 1 
Maplelcafs 3, Redwings 1 
Canadicns 2. Nordiques 2 
Seals 2, Kings 1 
Western Conf. Grades 7-8 
W L T 
Blackhawks 6 1 1 
Oilers 5 2 

Sharks 5 2 

Ducks 4 2 1 

Wolves 4 3 

Redwings 3 4 

Penguins 2 5 

Kings 1 6 

Stars 0.7 

Eastern Conf. Grades 7-8 
Lightning 7 1 

Sabres 7 

Flyers . 4 3 

Bruins 4 3 

Islanders 4 '3 

Rangers 3 4 

Thunder 2 5 

Devils 1 6 

Panthers 7 

Results 

Wolves 8, Kings 6 
Ducks 3, Penguins 2 
Islanders 2, Panthers 1 
• Oilers 7, Penguins 4 
Lightning 6, Panthers 1 
Flyers 3, Devils 2 
Blackhawks B, Redwings 6 
Flyers 8, Thunder 3 
Sharks 4, Stars 2 
Blackhawks 3, Oilers 3 
Bruins 5, Devils 4 
Lightning 9, Rangers 5 
Islanders 4, Thunder 2 
Sabres B, Bniins 2 
Wolves 5, Sharks 2 
Ducks 4, Stars 1 



Pts. 

12 

12 

10 

8 

6 

6 

4 

2 

Pis. 

15 

14 

11 

9 

9 

8 

2 



16 

12 

11 

7 

6 

6 

4 



15 

12 

9 

9 

B 

5 

5 

4 



Pts. 

13 

12 

10 

9 

8 

6 

4 

2 



14 

14 

8 

8 

8 

6 

4 

2 





Round Lake, Grant lead 
-NWSC team 





The Northwest Suburban Conference has 
named its Ml- NWSC Team. Conference champ 
Round Lake led the field, with all five starters 
making the honorary team, Including three on 
me first team and two honorable mentions. 

Team scoring leader Rob Moore, a 6-5 junior 
guard, was not only a unanimous selection by the 
NWSC coaches for the squad, but was named 
most valuable player for the conference as well. 

Panther Mike Allen was another favorite of the 
NWSC coaches, 'file the 6-1 senior forward was a 
. unanimous selection. He is Joined on the first 
team by RLHS teammate John Stockwell, a 6-3 
senior guard. 

Grant placed three Bulldogs on the first team, 
led by Mike Nelson. Nelson, a 64 senior forward, 
Is joined on the first team by CMS teammates 
Brian Mikeis, a 6-0 senior guard, and Scott 
. Lanners; the 5-10 senior guard who acted as floor 
general for Coach Tom Maples. 

; Wauconda's Jeff Iindsey was another unani- 
mous selection. The 6-1 junior guard is joined on 



the top squad by teammate Jeff Gcrtz, 
Wauconda's '6-3 junior outside threat 

While they did not garner a unanimous 
selction, the Grayslake Rams were well-represent- 
ed. Seniors Luke Kron, theGHS man in the paint, 
and Brian Witt, the Rams' leading scorer, were 
both named to the all-conference squad. Kron is 
a 6-2 center, Witt a 6-0 guard /forward. 

Despite a disappointing season by the 
Skyhawks, Johnsburg senior Bill Dcvoy's talents 
were recognized with a first-team nod.' The 6-0 
guard is joined by Marian Central guard Matt 
Sabatka to round out the first-team selction. 

Round Lake's "bliie collar" reboundcrs were 
recognized with honorable mentions to the All- 
NWSC squad. Cristo Garza, a 6-2 senior forward, 
and Brett White, a 6-4 senior center, were both 
recognized by the conference. 

Grant's jason Loring also nabbed an honor- 
able mention, capping the 6-1 forward's senior 
season. Marian Central's Steve Mertel and Lewis 
Miskowicz completed the honorable mention list 



Sequoits- 

From page All 

Eric White scored a season- 
high 29 points in leading the 7th 
graders to a 66-58 win over 
Carmcl. Brandon White, at for- 
ward, added 11 points, while solid 
defensive performances by Lang- 
ner, Lodcsky, Perrone, Brown and 
Bryant Popp held the Carmcl in 
check during the second half. 

The 8th graders improved to 
11-1 with this week's wins. Against 
Lake Zurich, Steve Alberts led the 



: ■ ■■ - . ■-■■ :-;' • ■■'. 



Jr. Sequoits offense with 10 points, 
while Jason Schiller added nine 
and center Don Lackey dominated 
the boards. Brandon Clutts was 
Antioch's defensive standout. 

A Schulcr basket as time 
expired in overtime lifted Antioch 
to a narrow 57-56 win over 
Mundclcin. Schulcr led Antioch 
with 22 points, Alberts chipped in 
with eight, and Brady Schuitz and 
Brad Groth added six each. Clutts 
once again kept the heat high on 



defense, and Nate Zeller sparked a 
fourth-quarter rally with several 
steals. 

Carmel was the week's last 
victim, as Antioch dominated in a 
51-31 victory. Lackey led the 
charge with 16 points, while team- 
mates Schulcr and Quinn Gooch 
added nine and eight, respectively. 
Eric Drozc sparkled defensively, 
with Luke Denoma and Jon Logan 
contributing at both ends of the 
floor. 




0~ 



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O Antioch News-Reporter 
O Fox Lake Press 
O Grayslake Times 

□ Gurnee Press I 
O Lake Villa Record 

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O Round Lake News 

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- 




COMMUNITY TSSmA Newspapers MarcIi'i, 1996 



if 

; 



From ThE CApiTAt 









US Cong. Philip M. Crane (R) 



Republicans force President to protect seniors 



As a result of President Clinton 
signing Into law legislation I 
cosponsored, Social Security re- 
cipients had no worries that they 
might experience a delay in re- 
ceiving their March Social Secu- 
rity checks. The President had lit- 
tle choice but to sign the Re- 
publican bill protecting Ameri- 
can senior citizens. 

As the battle over the budget 
continued into this year, Presi- 
dent Clinton began to wage a 
scare campaign against seniors. 
It was this presidential scare 
campaign that caused 
Republicans to draft a bill, the 

Lots of winners 
at NICC 



derby 



The largest fish caught in each 
location are as follows: Channel 
Lake, 35-inch northern caught by 
Jeff Ostapczuk of Berwyn; Petite 
Lake, 3 1 -inch northern caught by 
Steve Ohs of Bristol, Wis.; and 
Pistakcc Lake, 31.1 -inch northern 
caught by Ronnie Sagar of Antioch. 
The smallest fish caught were: a 
24-inch northern in Channel Lake 
by John Vacula of Genoa City, Wis.; 
a 14-inch large mouth bass in 
Petite Lake by Tom Kruegcr of 
Antioch; a 13.7-inch catfish in 
Pistakcc Lake by Gene Hohm of 
Mcllenry; a 5-inch crappic in 
Channel Lake by Dave Glenback of 
Chicago; a 2.5-inch striped /rock 
bass in Channel Lake by Tom Foss 
of Wonder Lake; a 3.4-inch perch 
in Channel Lake by Dillon Haley of 
Antioch; a 3.6-inch bullhead in 
Channel Lake by Don Brecn of 
Antioch; .,. and a 1.5-inch 
blucgill/sunfish in Pistakcc Lake 
by Donald Haucr of Chicago. 

The largest fish caught in each 
10 species were; A 35-inch north- 
ern by Jeff Ostapcy.uk; a 20.7-inch 
large /small mouth bass by James 
Smith of Justice, HI; a 27.4-inch 
catfish by David Kreftring of 
Antioch; a 12.9-inch crappic by 
Keith Anderson of Park Ridge; a 
13,5-inch striped/rock bass by 
Jim Kuta of Elgin; an 11 -inch 
perch by Tom Vynalck of Lake 
Villa; a 4.5-inch bullhead by Rob 
Welter of Waukcgan; and an 0.8- 
inch blucgill/sunfish by Larry 
Richer of Algonquin. 

The ice shanty contest winners 
were: Jerry Drijc and Linda Hauck 
of Antioch for best original 
design, tied with Bob Shickcl of 
Antioch; and Brian Adams of 
Mcllenry for most unusual, tied 
with Tom Dillon of Inglcsidc. 

Timed fishing challenge win- 
ners were, for Feb. 10, Dave 
Rowlcn of Fox Lake (first); Tom 
Buller of Port Byron, IB. (second); 
and Roger Cicchan of Chicago 
(third). For Feb. 1 1 , first place went 
to Ciechan; second to Glenn 
Schilkc of Glcndale Heights; and 
third to Steve Dennis of Colona, 111. 
Coloring contest winners were 5- 
ycar-oldTony Tognarelli and 8-year- 
old Joey Casares, both of Antioch. 

Main ticket prize winners in- 
cluded: Charles DcFilippis of 
Waukcgan, who won a trip to the 
Bahamas/Las Vegas; Brad Frystak 
of, Fox Lake; Virginia Hcnkcl of 
Lake Zurich; Karl Fcucht of 
McHenry; Jeff Balanda of Brook- 
field, 111.; Bruce Knutscn of Bris- 
tol, Wis.; Floyd Matthews of 
Round Lake Beach; Mr. and Mrs. 
^ Don Lctich of Antioch; Carol 
Tsuha of Antioch; Dewey Paoletti 
of McHenry; Bill Trader of 
Bcnsenvillc; Carol Gasa of Oak 
Park; and Frank Mucclanti.of 
^'Palatine. " '" " ' 



Social Security Guarantee Act. 

Despite our repeated an- 
nouncements that we would pass a 
debt limit extension prior to March 
1, clearing the way for the Social 
Security checks to go out, the 
Resident continued to use fear to 
stir up our seniors. He was wrong to 
even raise the specter of not send- 
ing out Social Security checks. 

No segment of our population 
should be used as a pawn in the 
budget debate. 

Our legislation was intended to 



give the Secretary of the Treasury 
ample authority to assure the full 
payment of Social Security bene- 
fits in March. The bill— which is 
now law— accomplished this by 
creating temporary legal borrow- 
ing authority not subject to the 
debt limit In an amount exactly 
equal to the Social Security benefit 
payments in March, estimated at 
$30 billion. Such obligations are 
not counted as debt subject to the 
debt celling. 

We gave our seniors reassur- 



ance in the form of a Social Se- 
curity guarantee. Even though we 
promised the checks would go 
out on time because we would 
take action on the debt limit, our 
new law became a fail-safe for the 
seniors. The President had no 
excuse not to send out the Social 



Security checks. 

Why should tho President 
even put the seniors in the posi- 
tion of having to worry, about 
their Social Security benefits? It is 
unfortunate, to say the least, that 
the President gave them cause for 
concern for their March checks. 



FILE NUMBER: 
PETITIONER: 



REQUEST: 



PROPOSAL: 



DATE: 



TIME: 



PLACE: 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 

PZB96-1 

Robert E. Sllhan, AICP, 

Director of Planning, Zoning & Building 

Vlllago ot Anlioch 

074 Main Strool 

Antioch, IL 60002 

phono: (847) 395-1881 

fax: (847) 395-9482 

Petit km to amond to the Zoning Ordinance Toxl, 
specifically Sodlon 150.106-C-10-I. (and related 
Section 152.047-C and -D of tho Subdivision Ordinance), 
as It relates to the posting ot performance guarantees for 
public and quasi-public Improvements within new 
planned developments or P.U.D.'s, (and within now sub- 
divisions). 

Tho proposal Is In memo form, dated February 8, 1996 
from Bob Sllhan, and b available tor public viewing In 
the Office ot Vlllago Clerk, 874 Main Street; and In tho 
Department of Planning, Zoning & Building; 885 Toll 
Avenue. Following tho Planning & Zoning Board's review 
and dolboratlon, revisions within tho context ol tho 
proposal may bo rocommended. 

Thursday, March 21, 1996 

7:45 p.m. 

Board Room, Vlllago Hall 
874 Main Slrool 
Anlioch, IL 60002 



... .O/ (^{•WfcMi-**' •<•»>■***« 



All persons desiring to appear and bo heard thereon for or against said 
petition may appear at said hoaring and bo hoard. 

Barbara Johnson, Chairman 
Planning & Zoning Board 

0396A-631-AR 
March 1,1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

1. Time «nd Place of Opening of Bid a: 

Notice Is hereby given that tho Village ol Anlioch, IL will receive 
sealed bids at the Village Hall. 874 Main Slrool. Anlioch, IL 60002. 
until March 14, 1996 al 2:00 p.m. local llmo, at which timo and place 
the btds will be publicly opened and road. Bids will be acted upon al 
said timo and place, or such later llmo and place, as may then be 
fixed. 

2. Description of Work: 

The proposed work Is otllclally known as Pedorson Park Pavilion. The 
project consists of Installation ot a hexagon park sheltor at Pedorson 
Park. 

3. Availability of Piano and Specifications: 

Prospective bidders and suppliers may obtain plans and spec If lea- 
tlons Irom Clark Dlelz, Inc., 4235 Green Bay Road, Kenosha, Wl 
53144 upon Payment ol $10,00 for each sot. This paymont shall bo 
norv refundable, 

4. Method of Payment: 

Payment lor Iho work will be made In cash as slated In the Special 

Conditions. 

5. Bidder entering Into a contract for the work shall comply with the 
Preferonco to Cltlzons (Illinois) on Public Works Protect Act* (Illinois 
Revised Statutes, Chapter 48, Section 269 through 275) and the 
Wages of Employees on Public Works (Prevailing Wago Act) (Illinois 
revised Statutes. Chapter 48, Section 39s- 1 et soq). « 

6. Not less than prevailing rale of wagos as found by the Village ol 
Antioch or the Department ot Labor or determined by the Court ol 
Review shall be paid lo all laborers, workmen and mechanics per 
forming work under this contract. 

7. All proposals must bo accompanied by the codified chock, bank 
cashier's chock, bank dralt or bidder's bond payable to Iho Village ol 
Antioch for not less lhan ten (10%) percent of the amount of the bid 
as provided In the Instruction to Bidders. 

8. Rejection of Bldo: 

The Vlllago ol Anlioch reserves Iho right to dolor acceptance of any 
proposal for a period not to exceed forty five (45) calendar days alter 
the date bids are to bo received and to reject any or all proposals, and 
lo waive technicalities. 

Village ot Anlioch 

By Marilyn Shlnellug 

0396A-634-AR 

. . '^^.v. ••- v. • March1,1996 



FILE NUMBER: 
PETmONER: 

OWNERS: 
PROPERTY: 



REQUEST: 



PROPOSAL: 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
PLANNING & ZONING BOARD 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 

PZB96-3 

Spencer E. Eslep 
405 Blrchwood Dr. 
Antioch, IL 60002 

samo as petitioner 

Commonly known as 405 Blrchwood Drive; PIN 02-05- 
409-022; and legally doscribod as: Lot 18 In Block 15 In 
Oakwood Knolls, Unit No. 3, being a subdivision ol pari 
ol tho East Half ol Fractional Section 5, Township 46 
North, Rango 10, East of tho Third Principal Meridian, 
according to tho plat thereof recorded December 16, 
1954 as Document Number 848772, In Book 33 of Plats, 
Pago 17, In Lake County, Illinois. 

Petttlonor Is requesting a variation to the side yard 
requirement within Sedion 150.074-E, (rof, to Sec. 
150.072-E-2), ot Iho Antioch Zoning Ordinance. This 
ordinance section requires a sldo yard on each side of 
ton percont of tho lot width and a combined total of 
twelve feet. 

Petitioner proposes to construct an addition lo tho rear 
ol tho extsllng houso. Tho rear of tho existing L-shapod 
houso measures 20.28 feet In width. Tho proposed addi- 
tion would measure 6.0 fool deep by 2028 foot In width, 
to match Iho existing houso. The existing side yard set 
back Is approximately 4 feet. The polttloner Is requesting 
the variation in order for tho walls ol tho proposed addi- 
tion lo be In lino with the existing house. 



DATE: Thursday, March 21, 1996 

TIME: 7:30 P.M. 

PLACE: Board Room, Village Hall, 
874 Main Strool 
Antioch, IL 60002 

Ail persons desiring to appear and bo hoard thereon tor or against said polltlon 
may appear at said hoaring and be hoard. 

Barbara Johnson, Chairman 
Planning & Zoning Board 

0396A-632-AR 
March 1, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

FOR 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH METRA STATION 

SEALED BIDS will bo received by Iho Vlllago of Anlioch at 874 Main Street. 
Antioch, IL 60002 until March 28, 1996 at 2:00 p.m. at which llmo and place ail 
such bids will be oponod publicly and road aloud lor the following: 

Contractor shall as an Independent contractor and not as an agonl of the 
Vlllago of Anlioch provide all permits, labor, tools, equipment, Insurance, 
Iransportalion, facilities, elc, necossary for Construction ol lacilltlos on tho 
Wisconsin Conlral Railroad al Anlioch, Illinois in accordance wllh tho plans 
and speclflcallons prepared by Clark Dlotz, Inc., 4235 Groon Bay Road, 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 53144. 

All bids must bo mado only on tho forms provided by Clark Dlotz, Inc. and musl 
be made in accordance with this Invitation for Bids, and other Contract 
Documents, all of which are on Hie and available for examination at the above 
address and are mado a part ol this notice as though fully set forth horeln. 

Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit ol 10% ol Iho base bid price In 
tho form of a cashier's chock, certlflod chock or bid bond. Tho successful bidder 
will be required lo submit paymont and performance bonds In an amount equal to 
tho total value ol Iho award. There will bo a plan lee of $75.00 lor each set ol 
plans and specifications. For an additional $15.00, plans and spedlicallons can 
be mailed. Tho plans and spedlicallons can bo obtained by contacting Clark 
Dletz, Inc. 4235 Green Bay Road, Kenosha, Wl 53144, 414-657-1550. Tho plans 
and spedlicallons must be picked up at tho above address, and are available 
Monday thru Friday, between tho hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. 

Bidder entering Into a contract for tho work shall comply wllh tho 'Proforence to 
Citizens (Illinois) on Public Works Project Act" (Illinois Rovlsod Statutes, Chapter 
48, Section 269 through 275) and tho Wages ol Employees on Public Works 
(Prevailing Wago Act) Illinois revised Statutes, Chapter 48, Section 393-1 et 
seq.). 

Not less than prevailing rate of wages as found by Iho Village of Antioch or the 
Department of Labor or determined by the Court ot Review shall bo paid to all 
laborers, workmen, and mechanics performing work under Ihls contract. This Is a 
community pfo)ecl, tho Village of Antioch encourages Iho use of local subcon- 
tractors and tabor. 

Requests for any change In tho Contract Documents must bo rocelvod no later 
than seven (7) calendar days prior to tho scheduled date lor bid oponlng. Thoso 
chango requosts must bo directed In writing to Clark Dlotz, Inc., 4235 Groon Bay 
Road, Kenosha, Wl 53144. 

The Village ot Anlioch reserves tho right to accept any bid or any part ol parts 
Ihoroof or to reject any and all bids. 



Village ol Antioch 

By Marilyn Sblnefhig 

. 0396A-635-AR 

March 1,1996 



Ma*cIt1,, 1996 La^Ianc! Ncwsp/*pc«» COMMUNITY 





'e bring (In: outdoors mshfe" 

peck & Porch enclosures 
Three Season Rooms 

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Lynn's 

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Family Styling Salon 

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587-3278 



161 S. Rt 12, Fox Lake 




LLLUiLCHia 

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Four Oaks Development 


K.K. Hamsher 


Advertiser 


Fox Lake Grade School District #114 


Korpan's SnoKommanders 


Air Controller Of Northern Illinou 


Fox Lake Lions Gub 


Lakeland Community Bank 


Allied Atr Conditioning 


Fox Lake Chiropractic 


Lilac Apis. 


American Legion Post #703 


Fox Lake Fire DepL 


Lioness Club of Fox Lake 


Backyard Enclosures 


Fox Riverboal Limited Partnership 


Lynn's Hair Reflections 


Bark 'N Town 


Fox Lake Ace Hardware 


MarBell Enterprises 


Bonnie Thompson Carter 


Fox. Lake District Library 


Radicom Inc. 


Bulletin . " ' 


Fox Lake Police Dept 


Robert D. Sayles Education Foundation 


Camp Fire Boys and Girls 


Fox Lake Travel 


S & R Heating & Cooling 


Career Resume 


Girl Scouts 


Second Federal Savingi 


Cass Photography 


Grant Township . 


Smothers Fence & Docks 


Dust Bunnies Cleaning Service 


Grant Township Area Athletic Assn. 


Sun Haven Enclosurers 


Fabian Chimney Services 


Grant Community High School 


Trinity Lutheran Church 


First of America Bank 


Hidden Cove Cellular ■ 


U.S. Coast Guard Aux. 


Firstar Fox Lake 


JB Glass Window & Door 


Village of Fox Lake 


Fleet Service 


Jerry's Parkway Foods 


YMCA Camp Duncan 


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587-2151 

301 S. Rte. 59 
Fox Lake, IL 



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|!WI COMMUNITY UkdANJ Newspaper MarcIi 1, 1996 





THA7*S 

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. • Ant Mtert lb tflPOfrkkwd Newspapers COUNTY 



PHDNDA HETRICK BURKE 



heating up Recorder of Deeds race 



Editor in Chief 

Alberta Meyer is charging her oppo- 
nent lor the Republican nomination for 
recorder of deeds is a "profes- 
sional politician masquerading 
as a successful businessman" to 
convince voters he is qualified. 

Meyer stated it is time "the 
public knew the truth about Bob 
Ncal." 

Opponent Bob Ncal is coun- 
tering the charge saying he will- 
ingly liquidated his business in 
19U7 after making a decision to 
devote his full-time energies to Meyer 
his various public duties. Today, the busi- 
ness still exists as a service provider but 
Ncal readily admits it's a one-man opera- 
tion and he docs work only for long-estab- 




lished customers. 

"I made a conscious decision to put my 
business on the back burner," said Neal 
"My children weren't interested In main- 
taining the business and my 
interests were in public life." 

Meyer, a Fox Lake 
trustee, is also charging Ncal of 
using political influence to freeze 
her out from appearing before 
some township groups known to 
make endorsements. 

She says the Antloch 
Township Republican organiza- 
tion endorsed Neal. "but never 

* * 

gave me the opportunity to' 
appear to state my qualifications." 

Ncal is a former Lake County Chairman 
(from 1902-1990) and has served as the 
county board representative from the 



COUNTY 



Wadsworth area since 1990. He also rcpre- amount which was approximately $3,600," 

scnts the county as a member of the Ncal said. 'In 1992, we decided to just clear 

Illinois Toll Highway Authority. the matter up and made the payments 

Meyer stated that Neal cleared up an over a 12 month period. Wc then received 



old lien against his business, Able 
Electronics, last year so that he 
could run for the recorder's 
office. 

"If Bob Ncal Is so successful, 
how did he have a lien placed 
against his business?" Meyer 
asked. 

Ncal says the Hen was for dis- 
crepancies in the amount of 
unemployment compensation 
paid by Able. "Wc were notified 




Neal 



In late 1989 or early 1990 about the dis- 
crepancies In payments," said Ncal. "We 
checked our records and our account 
checked and wc felt we had paid the 



a release from the lien, which I 
was not aware had been placed 
on the business. " Neal said the 
company's accountant delayed 
filing the release of lien until 
March 1995. 

Ncal established Able 
Electronics in 1961 after doing a 
four-year hitch in the Navy. Ncal 
is a Lake County native who was 
born in North Chicago and has 
lived in Wadsworth since he was 

4 years old. 

During the late 1970s and early 1980s, 

Able Electronics was the third largest 

Sec RACE page B6 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



pi 



p 







THIS WEEK 

Viewpoint 

Wisconsin 

targeting 

Illinois 

for 

growth 

PAXJEv 

B4 

Commentary 

Former County Board 
Chairman Geary says 
March 19 primary is 
referendum on growth 
PAGEB4 




Learning 
ancient art 

Spring Grove center 
teaches children 
RAGEB7 



Iife'sABear 

The truth about 
dinnertime f-il 
R\GEB11 

Music^otes 

Celebrate 10 years at 
Christi's PAGE Bll 




— . — ' * — 



'Beautiful Girls' about 
immature boys 
R\GEB12 




County moves to tighten zoning ordinance 



RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

Editor in Chief 

Lake County will likely be tightening the 
restrictions for developers in the next several 
months in an attempt to ensure natural 
resources -arc protected and that initial plans 
minor the final development 

The County Board has come under scruti- 
ny for its suburban zoning classification 
which allows very broad uses on a parcel. It is 
a weakness the board members recognize and 
want to fix, 

"Wc believe the suburban zoning classifi- 
cation is too high," said Richard Raftis, chair- 
man of the county board's planning, building 
and zoning committee. "We arc going to rec- 
ommend a change in density classification 
and build in a review process with the zoning 



board of appeals, and department heads." 

Raftis and J. Barry Hokanson, county 
director of planning, zoning and environmen- 
tal zoning, arc recommending the county 

We want to pursue a planned 
unit development concept 
blended with performance . 
zoning/ 

— Barry Hokanson, 
Lake County Director of Planning and 

Zoning 

develop and implement a unified develop- 
ment ordinance. 

The committee was to discuss particulars 



of the ordinance at this week's meeting and 
the full board may act on the request for pro- 
posals March 12. 

Under a unified development ordinance 
regulations would be consistent for all types 
of proposed development 

"We want to pursue a planned unit devel- 
opment concept blended with performance 
zoning," said Hokanson. 

Raftis says a performance zoning concept 
will enable a developer to cluster homes in 
order to protect natural resources and will 
result In a better development for both the 
builder and the prospect home buyer. 

" It will create more flexibility in the zoning 
process," said Raftis. "Right now, wc arc lack- 
ing the flexibility and design to do density 
Sec ZONING page B6 



County Clerk recruits Sailors as election judges 



RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

Editor in Chief 

The Lake County Clerk's 
office is embarking on a unique 
recruiting effort to obtain addi- 
tional election judges, they arc 
asking military members and 
civilian employees working at 
Great Lakes Naval Training 
Center to becoming hands-on 
participants in democracy. 

"This is another good 
resource for us to tap for volun- 
teers," said Susan Ewalt, elections 
administrator. "Wc have had a lot 
of success in several venues seek- 
ing election judges." 

In order for a military mem- 
ber to volunteer as an election 
judge they must be enlisted and 
be in a leave status, according to 
Lieutenant Commander Chris 
Fcketc, staff judge advocate for 
the Naval Training Center. 

"Sailors will be required to 
wear civilian clothes and cannot 
represent themselves as a federal 
government representative," said 
Fekctc. "Any request for leave 
must be approved by the Sailor's 
commanding officer." Civilian 
personnel must also request 
advanced leave. 

Commissioned officers arc 
not allowed to participate due to 
a statute which prohibits an offi- 
cer from accepting any position 
other than his commission. 

"The bottom line is they must 
act in a private capacity," said 
Fcketc. 

A special training course for 
Great Lakes personnel will be 
held March 16 at North Chicago 



High School from 9 a.m. to noon. 
According to Ewalt, the coun- 
ty needs a minimum of 1,669 
election judges for the March 
19th primary. The office is hop- 
ing to have 1,925 qualified judges 



ready to serve. 

"Right now we are 119 judges 
short," Ewalt said. "We want to 
have five judges in each 
precinct" 

In addition to Great Lakes per- 



sonnel, the county clerk's office 
has several high school seniors 
who have volunteered as election 
judges as well as members of the 
League of Women's Voters. 
See JUDGES page B6 








•\ 



i*3 







s 



7 



- ■ i 



I 




International Night 

Lake County 4-Hers from left, Beth Stiner of Zion, Heidi VanWeelden of Mundelein and Amber 
Rayniak of Lake Villa, each clad in native dress, prepare to answer questions from visitors to the 
4-H International Night at the Lake County Fairgrounds. The theme of this year's event was 'The 
World Comes to the USA." The event featured 4-Hers dressed and representing 15 countries 
from around the world. — Photo by Linda Chapman 






V>.\rj;,OtF' 



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COUNTY UkeUNcl Newspapers MarcIi 1,1996 ; 



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M arc U 1, 1996 LAktlANd Newspapers COUNTY 





Killer sentenced to 45 years 

HAINESVILLE— A Haincsville man convicted of 
first degree murder in the July 7, 1995 death of an 

acquaintance, was sentenced 
Monday and given 45- 
ycars in prison. "We 
asked for 45 and we 
got 45," said 
Assistant Lake 
County State's 
Attorney Michael 
Wcxler, He and 
fellow Assistant 
State's Attorney 
Elliot Pinscl argued 
their case along with 
Gary Matney's Defense Attorney 
James Borrasso. The defense 
reportedly asked the judge to grant 
their client around 20 years in 
prison. Because of the type of case, Matney was not 
eligible for the death penalty, said Wcxler. Last sum- 
mer, Matney, 34, reportedly beat Ronald Pecore, 47, 
into unconsciousness, and then dragged his body to 
the Route 120/134 railroad tracks in Haincsville near 
their campsite. A Mctra commuter train later ran over 
Pecore. 

Animal shelter opening 

GRAY5LAKE— Savc-A-Pet a humane home for 
stray, abandoned or unclaimed cats and dogs is build- 
ing a new shelter in Grayslakc at 31664 N. Fairfield 
Road between Routes 60 and 120. It is scheduled to 
open to the public June 1. The no-kill animal shelter 
operates on the philosophy of providing a humane 
environment for animals while working to place ani- 
mals in a home as soon as possible. The shelter trains 
and works with difficult animals to rehabilitate them 
for adoption. 

Convention center a hot topic 

GURNEE — Gumcc trustees learned a possible 
timetable for a convention center complex - if one is 
deemed economically feasible. The Village of Gumcc 
has contracted with the firm to do a four-phase 
$50,000 feasibility study of a hotel-convention center. 
Richard Starr of the firm said any convention center, if 
approved, would be at least two years away. 

Officials working on hydrants 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Village public works employ- 
ees with the cooperation of the Greater Round Lake 
Fire District arc working to solve fire hydrant problems 
in the village in the wake of a fire which destroyed a 
home on 1423 Tumbull Drive. The fire occurred on 
Feb. 20. Fire officials said it took a check of five 
hydrants before the department could find one that 
worked. No one was injured in the blaze. Village 
trustees told residents they will continue to make water 
upgrades such as a $179,000 water main project, a 1.5. 



million gallon water tower and a continuing replace- 
ment program for bad hydrants. 

Fremont eyes referendum 

MUNDELEIN— After receiving results of a growth 
management survey, the Fremont School Board of 
Education voted unanimously to direct the administra- 
tion to begin planning for a referendum question on 
the Nov. 5 ballot Voters approved a referendum for an 
addition to Fremont only a few short years ago, but 
growth in the district is already having an impact on 
class sizes. In the survey, 64 percent of respondents 
indicated building new facilities was their first choice 
for handling the increased student population. The 
use of mobile classroom units was the second choice 
favored by 59 percent of those who returned the sur- 
vey, while 39 percent preferred the option of increasing 
class sizes as a third choice. Rearranging the schedule 
into split shifts was deemed unacceptable by 69 per- 
cent of those responding. 

Town hall to be restored 

LIBERTYVILLE— The 101-year-old former town hall 
of Libertyville, now known as the Libertyville American 
Legion Post 329, is undergoing renovations to restore it 
Cupola. The building was originally topped off with a 
cupola that was removed in 1946 when a federal door- 
way was added to the building. The work is scheduled to 
be finished by Independence Day. The architect of the 
building was William Boyington who also designed the 
landmark Chicago Water Tower. His last commission for 
a new building was thought to have been the Illinois 
Building for the Columbian Exposition in 1893, but with 
the discovery of the Libertyville Town Hall plans in the 
Legion archives the Legion Building is now the last 
known building of his design. 

Business expo offers tips 

WAUCONDA— An opportunity to see what 
Wauconda has to offer in terms of shopping and ser- 
vices will take place this weekend at Wauconda High 
School, 555 N. Main St, in the form of the Third 
Annual Home and Business Expo. The expo is spon- 
sored by the Wauconda Chamber of Commerce and 
Lakeland Newspapers, and will be held on March 2 
from 10 a.nrt to 5 p.m. and March 3 from 11 a.m. to 4 
p.m. More than 40 organizations and businesses from 
Wauconda and the surrounding area will attend. A 

seminar on buying and getting the most out of your 
home computer will be held at 1 p.m. March 3. 
Admission is free, but a chance to win a family trip to 
Walt Disney World or Las Vegas will cost $1. 

Auction to benefit playground 

LAKE ZURICH— An auction featuring autographed 
sports memorabilia, a hot air balloon ride and gift cer- 
tificates to restaurants and stores will benefit construc- 
tion of an adventure playground this spring. All pro- 
ceeds from the auction, being held at 7 pm. March 2 at 
the Old Lake Zurich Fire Station, 77 S. Old Rand Rd., 
will benefit the Kids Kingdom Centennial Playground 
project, to be built in May in Paulus Park. Doors open 



at 6 p.m. Admission to the auction Is $5. A raffle will 
also be held during the auction, with a grand prize of a 
family trip to Walt Disney World. 

Shopping mall plans begin 

WAUCONDA— A group of Hoffman Estates 
investors arc proposing to build a shopping center 
complete with a grocery store, several retailers and a 
hotel or office building on 13 acres on the southwest 
corner of Routes 12 and 176. The Crown Group has 
already held discussions with a major grocery chain, 
determining if they are interested in opening a 65,000 
square foot store one block west of a Jewel Food Store 
in town. Linda Kost, a partner with the group, said 
they have not signed any leases, and remain in the pre- 
liminary design stage. Formal discussions with village 
officials should start later this month. Members of the 
Wauconda Chamber of Commerce and Wauconda 
Rcvitallzation Corp. arc concerned with the possible 
negative Impacts the center could have on existing 
businesses and future downtown improvements. 

RR whistle mandate delayed 

VERNON OILLS— Residents living in communities 
that have many railroad crossings may be able to sigh 
in relief temporarily as the federal government has 
agreed to postpone enforcing new legislation that 
demands mandatory whistle blowing at railroad cross- 
ings all hours of the day. Vernon Hills Village President 
Roger Byrne will join other communities in 
Chicagoland area opposing the mandatory whistle 
blowing. Byrne will also encourage other alternatives at 
railroad crossings. The Federal Railroad Administration 
was expected to enforce mandatory whistle blowing in 
November, but the FRA pushed the enforcement into 
1997 to allow communities to develop quieter alterna- 
tives. The federal government supports mandatory 
whistle blowing after studies showed accidents at rail- 
road crossings were greatly reduced when whistles 
were used before the crossing. For liability reasons, 
Vernon Hills recanted ordinances banning whistle 
blowing through its village. 

'ER' spurs apartment arson 

ANTIOCU — Antioch police charged ah arson sus- 
pect believed responsible for setting ablaze a three- 
story apartment building last week. After extensive 
Interviewing, police said Rachacl Hopkins, 22, of 

Antioch, admitted to detectives that she originally 
started a fire In the basement of her apartment build- 
ing located at 1224 Main Street:. Residents living In J 1 
of the 12 apartments have found housing elsewhere. 
According to Detective George Broeckcr, Hopkins 
intended on committing suicide by asphyxiating her- 
self by smoke inhalation. Broeckcr said Hopkins con- 
trived the idea after watching the popular television 
show "ER."Thc Feb. 22 episode of "ER" depicted a 
deadly fire in which several people suffered from 
smoke inhalation. After the show, she apparently 
locked her 2-year-old baby in her third floor apartment 
and went to the basement storage area where she 
wanted to start a small fire and breathe in the smoke. 



* 



/ 







Opponents advocate alternatives to Rte. 

*: ■*> . . tfcm that would he less intrusive as far a 

Claim state study proves road is not necessary 



SUZ1E REED ; 

Staff Reporter 

A transportation consultant came 
before the Corridor Planning Council to 
explain why alternatives should be 
explored before a final decision is made on 
the proposed extension of Rte. 53. 

Rick Kuner, president of New 
Alternatives Inc. completed a study last fall 
that showed the state had not proved the 
road was necessary, said Mike Truppa of 
the Environmental Law and Policy Center, 
a non-profit public interest group. 

"We arc working with the opponents of 
the proposed Rte. 53 toUway," Truppa said. 
"Our aim is to defeat the proposal and to 
put in its place a more robust set of alter- 
natives that arc going to solve the traffic 
problem In Lake County." 

The state has disregarded the viable 
alternatives, which need to be explored 
individually and in combination, he said. 

"Our feeling is that the toUway is a 
magnet for more traffic in Lake County," 
he explained. "It will change the quality of 
life. We want to try and alleviate future 
traffic problems and consider a much 
wider range of alternatives." 

With the Wisconsin Central Railroad 



expected to begin commuter rail service 
later this yoar, and the possibility of a sim- 
Uar service on the E J & E line in five or ten 
y ears __about the same time the roadway 
would be built— the demand for the road 
would be substantially decreased, said 
Truppa. . 

If Mctra takes away up to 15 percent of 
rush hour traffic from the existing roads, 
he said, the need to build the toilway is 
nullified, making the $3.5 price tag less 
cost-effective. Building the toll road, on 
the other hand, could jeopardize the 
investment already made in the Wisconsin 
Central commuter service. 

In planning for land use, developers 
should be encouraged to build around the 
rail lines. In this way, with the railroad as a 
major artery, people would be less depen- 
dent on private vehicles, said Truppa. 

The option of improving the estab- 
lished road network also should be consid- 
ered, said Truppa. State and county roads 
could be upgraded to handle the amount 
of traffic. 

Although each option can reduce the 
need for the new road, none is likely to 
alleviate the need for Rte. 53 by itself, he 
said. The combination is a viable alterna- 



53 extension 

ed," said Truppa "We need to choose an 
approach that preserves those amenities. 
There is ample indication that this 
approach is just as effective in relieving the 
traffic demand." 

SED0L Foundation will honor 
Motorola with Heart of Gold Award 



tivc that would be less intrusive as far as 
harming the environment and consistent 
with the quality of life in Lake County. 

"People cherish the fact that there is a 
lot of open space, it's rural and less pollut- 



When members of the Foundation for 
the Special Education District of Lake 
County gather for their 5th annual ban- 
quet, they will honor Motorola Inc. with a 
Heart of Gold Award. 

"They're really involved in helping the 
community in areas where they're locat- 
ed," said Marcy Dudas, executive director 
of the foundation. "SEDOL has been cho- 
sen as one of the organizations they help in 
Lake County." 

Motorola is trying to put together a job- 
shadowing program pairs company execu- 
tives with 16- to 18-year-old SEDOL stu- 
dents, she explained. The arrangement will 
allow the students to learn about working 
In such facilities. 

In addition, Motorola has provided 
financial support for SEDOL's outreach 
program which helps dysfunctional fami- 
lies in the area. 



The company also offers meeting 
space at the Libertyville facility that 
SEDOL may use for conferences and 
seminars. 

The banquet will be held March 9 at 
Concorde Banquets in Kildecr, beginning 
with cocktails and hors d'oeuvrcs at 6:30 
p.m. Dinner will be served at 7:30. The 
menu includes French onion soup, salad, 
vegetables, and a choice of filet mignon or 
chicken breast, with baked Alaska for 

dessert 

A silent auction will be conducted 
throughout the evening, and a door prize 
will be awarded for a Mexican vacation. 
Raffle tickets are available for $5 (6 for $25) 
with prizes ranging from $100 to $1,000. 
Tickets arc $100; those who cannot attend 
but would like to make a donation may do 
so. For more information call 548-8470. — 
by SUZ1E REED 



ui 




COUNTY UkelANd NovspApes MamIi 1,1996 



Independent thinkers 
get endorsement 



Lakeland Newspapers' expresses 
viewpoints on candidates for the 
March 19th primary election for U.S. 
Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, 
state representative, state senator and 
county offices this week. 

Salvi will bring leadership 

> Al Salvi represents the opportunity 
for Illinois voters to have a new conser- 
vative voice in the U.S. Senate. From 
the start of his term in the Illinois 
General Assembly, Salvi has estab- 
lished a reputation as a hard-working, 
conscientious lawmaker who could 
make up his own mind. 

This position has not endeared 
Salvi to Republican regulars who sup- 
port Lt Gov. Bob Kustra, whose voting 
record leaves constituents asking many 
questions. Kustra continues thumbing 
his nose at the electorate by openly 
refusing to discuss his policies in a 
public forum. Voters would be wise to 
seek answers to his record of changing 
his mind on significant voting issues 
and on his vocation. 

A vote for Salvi is a vote for inde- 
pendence and conservatism. Salvi has 
our enthusiastic endorsement. 

Crane represents district well 

Congressman Phil Crane (R-8th) 
represents the views of his district now 
more than ever. Me has become that 
elder statesman who is looked up to by 
freshmen in Congress. 

Don Huff is a token contender, who 
has made little effort to get his views 
across to the voting public. Crane is 
the clear choice. 

Porter deserves reelection 

Congressman John Porter's (R- 
10th) voting record clearly indicates he 
is a man who has a mind of his own. 
Despite his long-career In Congress, 
Porter has not become a part of the 
"Republican hlerarcy," yet still has the 
respect of party leaders for his inde- 
pendent stance. 

His liberal voting tendencies have 
come under Fire from opponent 
Richard Rinaoio, a 30-year-old Lake 
Forest businessman with the gumption 
to challenge the veteran statesman. 
Rinaoio may well have a promising 
future in politics, but this is not Ills 
race. 

Porter deserves reelection based on 
his record of service to the 10th dis- 
trict He was instrumental in keeping 
Great Lakes Naval Training Center 
open in its new role as the Navy's only 
naval training center. He also worked 
diligently to clear up the bureaucratic 
mess created by the closing of Ft. 
Sheridan and has secured greater fed- 
eral impact fees for the cash-strapped 
school districts affected by both mili- 
tary installations. 

Porter is a politician who refuses to 
be categorized. His voting record is 
testament to that Porter has our 
endorsement. 

Salvi for Dlst. 51 

Mike Salvi is a refreshing newcom- 
er to the political ranks. Salvi brings 
independent thinking and the courage 
to stand-up to the Republican Party 
with his bid to represent the 51st state 
house district which primarily includes 
Long Grove and Buffalo Grove. 

Incumbent Vcrna Clayton has to 
date left unanswered the question as to 
Why she decided to come out of rotire- 
'2 rhent and seek reelection. What 
^induced her to change her mind? 

What ever it was, it smells suspi- 
cious arid opens the party to charges of 
machine politics. Salvi is ,the one to 
rcprescntthe people of Dist 51. 



No leader In Dlst. 52 

Republican voters In western l.akc 
County have a choice between Mark 
Bcaubien, Jr., and Philip Mullenixto 
represent the 52nd district encompass- 
ing central and western Lake County in 
the state house of representatives. 

Bcaubien is a Barrington lawyer 
and banker with complete party sup- 
port tainted by ethical lapses and a 
lackluster county board record. 

Philip Mullenix is a young attorney 
with extreme views on gun control and 
a controversial stand on abortion. , 
Whoever wins will have the heavy 
responsibility of filling the shoes of Al 
Salvi. 

Wood unopposed In Dlst 59 

■'• Corrine Wood, who has a long- 
record of involvement with the Lake 
County Republican party, is running 
unopposed for state representative in 
Dist. 59, which represents Lake Forest, 
Lake Bluff and portions of Llbertyvillc. 

Dlst. 60 will be bot Nov. race 

Neither Democratic incumbent 
Lauren Beth Gash or Republican Joel 
Gingiss arc facing opposition in the 
primary election. However, look for 
this to be a hot race In the November 
general election as the Republicans 
seek to recapture this southeastern 
Lake County district 

Moore unopposed 

State Rep. Andrea Moore is unop- 
posed in the Republican primary. 
Moore represents central Lake County 
including libertyville and Warren 
Township in the state house. At this 
time there is no declared Democratic 
candidate. 

Churchill unopposed 

House Majority Leader Robert 
Churchill of Lake Villa Is also unop- 
posed in me Republican primary. He • 
will face opposition from Robert L. 
Molinaro 111 of Zion during the 
November general election. Churchill 
serves northern and western Lake 
County. 

Adams, link primary choices 

The Dlst 30 State Senate races have 
drawn the most candidates of any race 
on the March primary ballot Dist 30 
encompasses portions of Vemon, 
Libertyville, Waukegan and Deerfield 
Townships as well as Shields and West 
Deerfield Townships. 

Republicans have three candidates 
to choose from: Green Oaks Mayor 
Thomas Adams, State Rep. Tom 
Lachner and Christopher Stride, an 
assistant state's attorney. 

Democrats can chose between Lake 
County Chairman Terry Link and 
Lawrence Krulcwich, a relative 
unknown. 

Adams represents maturity, a 
level-head and a record of supporting 
mainstream Republican ideals. He 
has been a leader in business and has 
a consistent record of party involve- 
ment He has shown greater leader- 
ship In bringing economic develop- 
ment to Rondout and could translate 
that formula to bring greater eco- 
nomic development to Waukegan and 
North Chicago. 

Lachner is the party's choice. In his 
first term as a state representative, he 
has a questionable voting record on 
key issues. 

Stride, an assistant state's attorney, 
has been relatively quiet in this race 
giving the public little knowledge with 
which to make an informed choice. 

Our Republican endorsement goes 
Sec ENDORSEMENTS page B5 



-Commentary — 

March 19 GOP primary 
referendum on growth 



NORMAN GEARY 

former County Board chairman 

The March 19 Republican party primary 
for the County Board should be called a 
"Referendum on Growth." 

All the hotly contested races arc in the 
Republican party and give little reason for 
anyone to ask for a Democratic ballot 

Growth has been the burning Issue in 
the Lake County area since the late 70s. 
Most villages and the majority of the 
County Board rolled over for the devel- 
opment industry, which in turn financed 
many campaigns. 

The buzz word in the 1970s became 
"controlled growth" as farm field after farm 
field went under the bulldozer. Everyone 
learned the development industry was not 
about to be controlled. 

In the BOs we started to get a handle on 
growth tiirough farsighted planning as the 
Washingtpn Street Corridor, visionary land 
preservation as the Picket Pence Farm, and 
legitimate sewer restriction as on the 
Cunco land, to name just a few. 

When the pro-growth forces, all 



financed by the development industry, 
took control of the County Board in 1990, 
only the preservation of the Picket Fence 
Farm survived the developers' renewed 
onslaught. 

Picket Fence Farm would have allowed 
4,000 more houses to be built in Grayslake, 
plus staggering school costs. 

The Washington Street Corridor was 
lost to massive development and while 
Chairman Robert Dcpke . shuns 
responsibility, saying most of the growth is 
taking place in the villages, he provides 
them with county-owned sewer service, i.e. 
2,100 housing units on the Cunco land. 

If development doesn't pay its way, why 
give it county-owned sewer service? If 
there is no sewer, there is no development 

On March 19 you have an opportunity 
to change direction, but only if you vote. 

Editor's note: Norman Geary served 25 
years as a Lake County Board member, rep- 
resenting Grayslake, Round Lake and west 
county communities. He was chairman 
twice. Geary now is retired and resides in 
Antioch. 



EDITORIAL 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



-ViEwpoiiMT— — 

Wisconsin targeting 
Illinois for growth 



DILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 

Wisconsin will be knocking on doors in 
Illinois March 6 and 7 to encourage busi- 
ness and industry to relocate to the Badger 
state. 

Our neighbor to the north has an enticing 
story, worker's compensation rates up to 
60 percent lower than Illinois; third lowest 
electric bills in the country (Comlid, please 
note); lower land costs, stable labor force 
with a strong work ethic, tax credits and 
exemptions. There's more. 

Gov. Tommy Thompson has directed that 
economic development agents target two 
days in Illinois to tell the Wisconsin story. 
It's impressive. Consider such things as: 

— A public education system where stu- 
dents consistently rank first or second in 
national SAT and ACT coUcge entrance 
exams. 

— A network of technical colleges pro- 
viding specialized training. 

— A pro-business attitude through all 
levels of government 
And Gov. Thompson didn't even mention 
the great musky fishing, water skiing or 
Packers. 

For years, greedy Chicago politicians have 
been the biggest contributors to growth in 
Lake County and the other collar counties by 
pushing business out of the city. Now 
Wisconsin leaders arc making it awfully 
attractive for relocating businesses to keep 
going a little farther "out of town." They arc 
out to add to their initial successes. 
• * ** ••* 

WORD FROM RUSH— Conservative 
talk show host Rush Limbaugh is involved 
in Lake County politics. Sort of. 
Congressman John Porter, on the cam- 




paign trail for reelection, is relating how 
Rush applauded his efforts as chairman of 
the Labor-HHS and Education 
Appropriations Subcommittee to cut 170 
federal programs. "Apparently that's not 
conservative enough for my opponent," 
remarked Porter ruefully. Porter is smart- 
ing from charges that he's too moderate-— 
-and curses, openly liberal — for voters in 
the 10th Dlst We'll see. 

••*•••• 

SELF PROMOTION — Bob Ncal, Mr. 
Everything in Lake County politics, is set- 
ting new records for unbashed, self 
exploitation in his campaign for the 
Republican nomination for recorder of 
deeds. Among his campaign parapherna- 
lia is a jacket cmblazcncd on the back, 
"Bob Ncal, Recorder of Deeds." In teeny 
weeny print is an embroidered line, 
"Republican Candidate." Bob's jacket 
prompted a meeting chairman to remark 
the other day, "We won't have to ask Mr. 
Ncal to introduce himself. He's a walking 
billboard." 

•*****• 

ONE MAN'S FAMILY— Caliie, our faith- 
ful shepherd, has a long face now that 
spring weather is approaching. She loved 
to romp in the snow and lay down in a 
drift, even during the sub-zero snap. The 
snowbank was almost as enjoyable as a 
clandestine snooze on pop's bed. 
****.••• 

Bill Schroeder offers editorial commen- 
tary every Tuesday on Lake County Live 
presented by STAR Cltannel 3/U.S. Cable 
at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. 



.; 



Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be on topics of general interest 
approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, and contain a home 
address and telephone number/The editor reserves the right to condense all let- 
ters..;. ...&;,;•; 



S9B6 



m 



■r 









-Party Ljnes- — — — — 

Wolf fundraiser brings 
out GOP big dogs' 



M*«ch 1, 19*6 UIceW Newspapers COUNTY 




Party Lines, the Lakeland Newspaper 
column of political commentary, is pre- 
pared from staff reports. 

The party leaders are coming out In 
support of county board candidate 
Michclc Wolf. State Rep. Robert 
Churchill and State Sen. Adeline Geo- 
Karis will be will be co-host of the Dist 3 . 
candidate's pre-election rally March 7. 
The event will start at 7:30 p.m. at the Lake 
Villa VFW on Grand Ave. Cost is $15 per 
person, $25 for two people. 

Wolf, an insurance agent and Lake Villa 
Township trustee, is seeking to unseat 
incumbent Suzi Schmidt, who has a record 
of not "going along" with party regulars. 

Ticket chairmen for the event arc. 
County Republican Chairwoman Lynnc 
Mark and Lake Villa Township Republican 
Chairman William Burns. 

Seems the party machine is sending a 
message to Suzi that they'll pull out all the 
stops in this primary. 

• • • 

Construction talk gone— Fox Lake 
Village Trustee Jim Pappas explained the' 
problem with the mix-up in radio frequen- 
cies between the Big Hollow School in 
Inglcsidc, and the new Menards home 
improvement center has ceased. "I was at 
the school this morning and they said they 
haven't heard a peep!" said Pappas. Last 
week he told the village board when he was 
at the school to pick up his kids last week 
he overheard some foul talk over the PA 
system, which was coming from construc- 
tion workers unknowingly on the same fre- 
quency. 

Give me an "M n — Looking at the 
design for the front entry of the Mundclctn 
High School addition, board member 
Thomas Hannlgon was Inspired by the 
columns. "Arc they weight-bearing?" he 
asked. What he had in mind was the addi- 
tion of diagonal columns to make a giant 
"M". Other board members convinced him 
letters spelling out 
"Mundelcin High 
School" on the side of 
the building would be 
sufficient. 




Will the real 
Republican please 
stand up — Peter 

Silk, a Republican 

candidate for the 

Lake County Board in Suk 

Dist. 17, admits Stevenson Mountlser, 

one of his opponents, is the only real 
Republican in the race. However, that is 
not what he thinks the community needs. 



Endorsements 



From page B4 
to Thomas Adams. 

On the Democratic side, Terry Link is a 
viable candidate who articulates the 
Democratic views and has a record of 
leadership. He garners our Democratic 
endorsement 

Geo-Karis unopposed 

State Senator Adeline Jay Geo-Karis is 
unopposed on either front to continue her 
role as state senator representing Dist. 31. 
the district includes AntJoch, Lake Villa, 
Newport, Warren, Benton and Zion 
Townships as well portions of Waukcgan 
and Ubertyvillc townships. Her record of 
service in the general assembly is indica- 
tive of why no other candidates are chal- 
lenging the political pioneer. 

Coroner unopposed 

Republican Barbara Richardson's role 
as Coroner is also unchallenged in the pri- 
mary. Her work speaks for itself. 




"We do not need another four years of the 
good old boys," Suk said. "I am an inde- 
pendent Republican," he said. "That is the 
best kind to serve the people of Dist. 17." 

• • • 

ICA steps ont — 

The political commit- 
tee of Illinois Citizens 
Action has 

announced their 
endorsements for the 
March primary which 
are characteristically 
out of step with the 
party regulars. In the 
county board races 
the nod goes to Schulien 
incumbent Suzi Schmidt in Dist. 3; 
Bonnie Thomson Carter in Dist. 5; 
Robert Powers in Dist 6; Al Westerman 
in Dist 7 over chairman Bob Depke; 
Sandy Cole in Dist. 11; Terry Weppler 
over Republican Party Chairman John 
Schulien in Dist 13; Mary Seattle in 

Dist 16; Alan 
Roberts in Dist 17 
and Norma Sayles 

in Dist 20. 

• • • 

Spending cut 
leader — According 
to an independent 
analysis by the 
National Taxpayers 
Union (NTU), over 
Roberts the last year Rep. 

John Porter (R-lOth) voted to cut more 
spending than most other members of 
Congress. The NTU "Vote Tally" report 

shows that Porter voted to cut over $38.9 

billion In total spending during 1995. 

• • • 

Farm Bureau echoes Centra] 
Committee— The Lake County Farm 
Bureau's endorsement session of primary 
candidates mirrored the one conducted by 
party regulars In November with the 
exception that they endorsed Mary 
Seattle (R-16th) as opposed to finding her 
qualified for the job as the central commit- 
tee did. The move puts the Farm Bureau 
right in step with pro-development forces. 

• • •■ 

Link gains AFL-CIO 

endorsement — Lake County 
Democratic Chairman Terry link has 
received the Illinois AFL-CIO endorsement 
for the State Senate seat in Dist. 30. "Their 
concern for progress and the best interest 
of workers is a record to be proud of," said 
Link. "I am honored to have their confi- 
dence and support." Link has also 
received the 1PAC endorsement 





TO 





[TOR 



Coffelt unopposed 

Republican Circuit Court Clerk Sally 
Coffelt is also unopposed for renomina- 
tion. She will continue to bring a record of 
devotion to the job. 

No choice for Recorder of Deeds 

Lake County voters have a choice 
between a career politician and a seven- 
year employee of the Recorder of Deeds 

office. 

Bob Ncal, represents the Lake County 
Republican machine. As past party chair- 
man and county board member since 
1990, he is the obvious party choice. 

Election to the post of recorder would 
be a quantum leap for Meyer, who has 
been a clerical worker in the office for the 
past seven years. No endorsement in this 

race. 

Editor's note: Lakeland Newspapers' 
views on contestants for county board 
nominations will appear in the March 8th 
edition. 



Motor Voter comprises 

Editor. 

As local election officials, municipal 
clerks throughout Illinois, want to caution 
voters that the voter registration rirocess 
has been compromised by the two tier 
system operating In our state. 

In 1993 the National Voter 
Registration Act was signed Into law effec- 
tive January. The law provided that voter 
registration be offered at motor vehicle 
offices (hence, the name Motor Voter), and 
other public agencies. The governor and a 
; majority of legislators have failed to pass 
the laws needed to Implement the Intent 
of the act leaving Illinois and Mississippi 
as the only two states in the country with a 
two tier system 

..'-' The impact on all of us is that when 
We register for the first time, change our 
name or move to a new address, we have 
'■_ to.pay dose attention to how we are 
being registered. If you take advantage of 
the apparent convenience of voter regis- 
tration while renewing or updating your 
drivers license; you may be registered to 
vote in federal elections only. When you 
appear at the polls on election day whha" 
yellow voter registration card, marked for 
federal elections only, you will be given a 
ballot with only the offices of United 
States President senator and congress- 
man. You will not be eligible to vote for 
governor, state senator and reprcsenta- • 
fives; county and township offices,- mayor 
and council positions, school board, park 
district, library board or referendum 
questions. 

To ensure your right to vote for all 
your elected representatives Is guaran- 
teed, contact your municipal derk to learn 
where voter registration services arc avail- 
able to your community-municipal and 
township offices, libraries and schools. To 
;". express your outrage over the complicated 
and expensive systc^ 
Illinois, askyour clerk to provide the 

names and phone nurnbens of your legis- 
lators and Governor Udgur. Take twpstdn- 
ures to call thcJr office and tell them wo 

need a sUigle tier system now. 

Take action today to safeguard the 
election process so basic to our fonri of 5: 
democracy; Vote for the candidates who 
will show me common sense we all 
understand and work to provide the fair 
and honest representation we all want 
and deserve. 

V iKathyRyg 
VemonHills 




Unknowing members 

Editor. 

It is a despicable shame that many 
people have to die before the community 
leaders decide to do something about 
dangerous conditions. 

For Instance, four young people had to 
die before any action is taken to address 
the dangers at the intersection of 
Washington Street and Rte. 45. Anyone 
paying attention to detail would have rec- 
ognized that danger long ago. Given the 
grade of the land, it Is obvious that the 
speeds on those roads are too high given 
the closeness of family houses. Also, a 
guard rail is necessary because of the 
height ofWashington Street with respect 
tothehouses. 

Unfortunately, the dangers do not end 
there. How many more people have to die 
before the dangers at the intersection of 
Hunt Club Road and Gages Lake Road arc 
addressed Given the lack of light and the 
traffic load during rush hour, it is plainly 
obvious that a traffic light is needed at that 
intersection. So many people have died 
there already, and the only memory of 
them Is a cross of flowers. Why cannot our 
community leaders identify these obvious 
dangers and act on them now? 

Also, why mustYorkhouse Road be 
extended, possibly increasing dangers to 
our lives and our environment? Some 
panels of land may benefit from this 
extension. It Is interesting to see who 
owns those parcels of land and who is 
pushing for the extension. 



As a patent attorney, I serve my clients 
by securing for them the broadest protec- 
tion available and by identifying dangers 
and advising my clients how to bestavoid 
those dangers. As a member of the Lake 
County community, I.offcrwhateverser- 
vices I can to deal with the dangers we all 
live with. If many people join me In this 
effort, maybe our community leaders will 
reduce these dangers as soon as possible ' 
so that all of us and our children live in a 
safer neighborhood 

Mark C.Bach 
Gumce 

Developers run amuck 

, Editor 

The proposed 18 mile extension of Rte. 
53 through Lake County is going to cost $1 
billion and the ultimate destruction of tens 
of thousands of acres of vital farmland 

Everyone knows, due to runaway 
development prornotcd by mostyillage 
boards and a very pro-growth County 
Board! something must be done to handle 
the predictable traffic congestion. The 
curb-growth LakeCounty Board of 1988 
*>9Epi>sed Rte. 53, believing there were \xX- 
Mrmemix^ss^r^T^^^x^c con- 
gestion. :~? 

One alternative was to widen and 
update existing roads which would also be 
costly; Another that had great possibilities 
was "staggered work hours" compliment- 
ed by van pooling and public transporta- 
tion. In Lake County as everywhere, every- 
one goes to work and home at the same 
j time and generally with only one person 
per 'car. Our roads are gridlocked four 
Hours each day, 7 to 9 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. 
Extend th at time to eight hours and some 
imaginative planning by business and 
industry, billions of dollars and thousands:, 
of acres ofland could be saved just An lake 
County. 

At the some time, cut the peak traffic 
toads 30 to 40 percent, using existing 
roads. Why haven't vw further explored 

tills unique concept of truffle control? In a 
xmr^'fnohcy.^JGBcg'laJnlad the'thrva 
thjto^ need«l to: jfaef con ri^ 
development arc publidy paid fofscwer 
lines, water lines and roads. Since 1990, 
the development industry has ran amuck 
in Lake County with the blessings of lead- 
ing state, county and village officials 
resulting In i massive traffic problems we 
all now face.' 

F.T. "Mike" Graham 
libertyvlile 

Socks the file culprit 

Editor. - ..-..- • 

In recent weeks, we have all been 
challenged by media to contemplate 
the mystery of what is going on around 
the White House and in Congress with 
this White-water Inquiry. Senator 
D'Amato has been prominent with his 
exploration of the wrong doing of First 
Lady Hillary Clinton. . 

After studying the evidence and con- 
templating this matter, I have arrived at 
the following conclusion: Hillary is telling 
the truth, in that she does not know how 
the billing statements from the Rose law 
firm found their way into the room adja- 
cent to her office in the private quarters of 
the White House. 

I believe, after detailed examination, 
that what happened Is that Chelsea, seek- 
ing some quality time with her beloved 
pet, temporarily brought Socks up from 
the White House basement, where Socks 
has been banished for sometime as 
punishment for clawing the furniture, and 
Socks put the files on the tabic where they 
were found by Hillary's secretary and the 
cleaning staff In the process of moving Al 
Gore to dust the furniture. 

God knows what else might turn up 
If Gore were moved more frequently. 
This solution does not totally exonerate 
the first lady in the central issue, but 
hopefully will allow the committee to 
'-get on with the more important aspects 

of this case. 

Wilson B. Muse 
McHenry 



u 






I -I 



t * 



% 



■ 




COUNTY UIceM Newspapers MarcIi 1, 1996 



Grayslake man charged with unlawful use of gun 



TINA 1. SWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

Through the combined 
efforts of police departments, a 
% Grayslake man was arrested and 
charged with shooting off a 
weapon as well as his mouth. His 
counterpart, a Round Lake Park 
woman, was also taken into cus- 
tody. 

A Hainscsvillc Police sergeant 
going through his nightly beat 
about town last weekend, heard 
gunshots as he headed cast- 
bound on Route 120. 

Sgt. Mike Wisnicwski report- 
ed approximately nine shots 
coming from the Northbrook 
Sports Club area. Since it was 
12:30 a.m., the officer knew the 
place was probably not open for 
business. 

Me had prepared himself for 
the worst, nonetheless. "Because 
(of the shots] I had a feeling 
something had to happen involv- 
ing a potential firearm,'' said 
Wisnicwski, aJ^j^J-poVn* WsP" 
cYarT 



The officer honed in on the 
noise which led him to Alleghany 
Road and Sports Club Drive. 

There, as he pulled the squad 
closer down the street towards 
the gun club, the sergeant 
observed a pick up truck parked 
on the roadway with no lights on. 

A female was standing at the 



Gnarro turned towards the 
officer and proceeded to walk 
towards the squad car. 

At this point Wisnicwski 
immediately put the patrol vchi 



the scene, he and Wisnicwski 
observed Gnarro run on foot into 
a plowed com field. 

The police duo pursed the 
subject for approximately 50 



potential firing range. 

Once the officer was a safe 
distance from the subject, he 



'Because [of the shots] I had a feeling something 
had to happen involving a potential firearm/ 

— Sgt, Mike Wisnicwski, 
a 14-year police veteran 



rear of the truck with her hands 
inside her jacket pocket and a 
male subject — Mark Gnarro, 39, 
of Grayslake, was on the passen- 
ger side of the truck with the door 
open. 

The police officer pulled up to 
the truck and shined his patrol 
lights on the vehicle. Suddenly he 
observed Gnarro produce from 
his iar'-«r what was found later to 
be a 9 mm semi-automatic hand- 
gun. 



clc into reverse and sped out of yards when Gnarro suddenly 

turned around and began walk- 
ing back to the pick up truck, dis- 
regarding verbal commands to 
stop and put his hands up. 

Officers also noticed the sub- 
ject placed his hands into his 
right-side jacket pocket. 
Wisnicwski tackled Gnarro and 
proceeded to handcuff him, but 
the subject struggled and tucked 

requested further backup from his arms underneath his body. 



Cencom. While he was doing this, 
the sergeant noticed the subject 
standing at the rear of the pick up 
truck. 

Three times he demanded 
Gnarro drop the gun and place 
his hands in the car. The subject 
then ran to the front of the truck 
and out of view for a brief 
moment. 

When Round Lake Park 
Officer Jerry Schneider arrived on 



Zoning 

From page Bl 
transfers." 

Hokanson says the proposed changes will do 
good things for the protection of natural 
resources and wooden areas. 

"What we will sec is larger areas of open space 
in a development," said llokanson. 

Other proposed changes will include the 
implementation of a design standard at the time 
of plat approval. 

"Many villages do this today and the county 
should be doing it as well," said Hokanson. 'The 
design standard must be put in place at the time 
of plat approval so it can't be deviated from when 
development begins." 

Raftis says the need for such a provision is 
evident in the Brando development in unincor- 
porated Mundelcin. The county approved a zon- 
ing change several months ago at the request of 
developer Tim Townc. 

"When we approved the zoning change the 
parcel had no access to sewer and water so he 
could build only one home per acre," Raftis said. 
"After we granted the zoning change, he applied 
to the Northern Illinois Planning Commission 
for a sewage treatment plant and is now 
building a 9-hole golf course and 300 condos. 
The county can't change the zoning back now 
because his plans changed, we have to 
change the rules so a developer can't change his 
plans." 

The county's request for proposals bid to con- 



sultants will specify the development of a unified 
development ordinance and the elimination of 
redundancies to eliminate overlap which exists in 
the current ordinances. 

"The current ordinance book is 3 inches 
thick," said Raftis. "We want to create a workable 
document." 

The county is seeking an outside consultant 
to prepare the proposals because they believe it 
will result in greater efficiency and be accom- 
plished faster. 

"We have kept positions vacant within the 
department to accommodate the cost of the pro- 
posal," said Hokanson. 

It Is estimated it will take six months to write 
the proposal and then three to six months for 
public hearings on the changes. 

"The public hearing process is so important," 
said Raftis. "We have to allot time for property 
owners to hear the plans and to make sure they 
arc not abused in the process." 

The short-term changes to tightening up the 
suburban zoning classification will be imple- 
mented immediately, according to Hokanson. 

"We arc doing things today to encourage 
developers to follow the ideas we are proposing," 
said Hokanson. "The staff has gone through and 
identified the issues we need to address immedi- 
ately. A design standard can also be put in place 
immediately." 

"Wc will have this accomplished in a year," 
said Raftis. 



Race 



From page Bl 

electronics service company in Illinois. 

"If she doesn't believe that I can pull the ser- 
vice contracts and other paper work to back up 
those claims," said Neal. In 1966, Able 
Electronics was the only service company in the 
U.S. for Sony products. 

Neal counters the charge of being a failed 
businessman, " If I had continued to make the 
business a viable venture, I would be a wealthy 
man today," Neal said. "This (public service) is 
what I decided 1 wanted to do with the rest of my 
life, after my children we're grown and that's why 
I got out of business." Neal was to be the 



Republican candidate for county clerk in 1992 
but asked to be taken out of consideration when 
Willard II dander agreed to run. 

Neal said he also feels strongly that if he is elect- 
ed Recorder any employee discussing sensitive 
information learned in the office will be dismissed. 

"The information is of public record, but it 
should not be discussed by employees," Neal 
said. 

Meyer, who has worked in a clerical position 
in the recorder's office for the past seven years, 
took the job after the failure of a family business. 
Meyer and her husband, Bill, were in the heating 
and air conditioning business. 



Jugdes 



From pagcBl 

"We are thrilled with the response we have been 
getting, but we still need more," Ewalt said. "We 
have 12 high school seniors from Zion-Bcnton and 
six from Warren Township who arc volunteering as 
part of a project for their government class. This is 
a great way for them to learn hands-on about 
democracy which they are studying." 

Ewalt said several League of Women Voter's rep- 
resentatives arc donating their judge pay to the 



organization as a fund-raiser. 

Trained judges receive $80 per day and 
untrained judges receive $60. Election judge hours 
are approximately 5:30 am. to 9 p.m. 

Election judge training sessions will be held, 
March 9 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Ramada Inn 
In Waukcgan and March 11 from 9 a.m. to noon 
at the Mundelcin Holiday Inn. For more infor- 
mation on being an election judge call Ewalt at 
360-3610. 



It took officers only moments 
before they had handcuffs on 
Gnarro, and proceeded to search 
him for the weapon they 
observed earlier. No gun was 
found. 

Linnca Cunningham, 30, of 
416 Center Lane, Round Lake 
Park, was lying on the pavement 
as commanded earlier by police. 
Police continued to search 
Gnarro and found two 9 mm 
rounds In his left pocket. 

By this time Grayslake Police 
officers Kevin Robinson and 
Dave Williams arrived and assist- 
ed by placing Gnarro in his patrol 
vehicle as Cunningham was 
being handcuffed and put In the 
1 laincsvillc squad car. 

Upon a second check of the 
pick up truck, cops located more 
ammunition including a 9 mm 
clip with three bullets still loaded 
laying on top of the open tailgate. 
There was also a small plastic box 
containing nine 9 mm Luger 
rounds inside, also on top of the 
tailgate. 

Police also found two knives 
in the bed of the truck, one with a 
brown wood handle with a blade 
approximately 8 inches in length; 
and another with a black handle 
with a blade about 5 inches. 

Officers collected the items 
for evidence and secured them in 
the squad car. 

When police returned to con- 
tinue their search of the vehicle, 
they discovered three spent 9 
mm shell casings on the grass. 

When Wisnicwski began 
speaking to both subjects, he 
reported smelling a strong odor 
of alcohol on their breath, and 
also noted that their speech was 
slurred. 

After advising Cunningham 
of her Miranda rights, officers 
asked her what they were doing 
on Sports Club Drive. " 'Mark and 
I pulled over here so Mark can 
shoot his gun and show me how 



to use it,' " she was reported as 
saying. 

Then she was asked if she 
knew where the gun was. " 'I'm 
not telling you anything!' M 
Cunningham reportedly 

answered. 

Police said then the female 
subject proceeded to scream and 
yell as loud as she could, to gain 
her friend's attention. 

At this point Gnarro was in 
the back scat of the Grayslake 
squad car, allegedly attempting 
to kick out the drivers side win- 
dow. 

After an extensive search of 
the cornfield, officers along with 
the Lake County Sheriffs Police 
Canine Unit were unsuccessful in 
finding the gun. 

Since it was dark outside, offi- 
cers decided to postpone the 
search until later that morning. 

Hainesvillc police transport- 
ed Cunningham to Cencom in 
Round Lake for processing. 
Round Lake Park Police officer 
Jim Sanato transported to 
Gnarro. 

After speaking with Lake 
County State's Attorney's, offi- 
cers charged Gnarro with a 
felony. He was given citations of 
unlawful use of a weapon (he had 
a revoked Firearm Owner's 
Identification Card), resisting 
arrest and aggravated assault. 

After going before a judge, he 
was later released on $25,000 
bond. 

Cunningham was issued a 
charge of obstructing justice and 
was released on a recognizance 
bond of $1,000. 

Later that morning, police 
went to the site with members of 
the citizen's volunteer group 
Mobile Eye, as well as Round 
Lake Park Police Officer Howard 
Jens and continued searching for 
the gun. 

Sgt. Wisnicwski said he later 
discovered the gun had been hid- 
den inside the pickup truck 
which was towed to A-l Tire in 
Round Lake. Since the vehicle 
had been left unlocked, the offi- 
cer explained he believed some- 
one had "jumped the fence" and 
gone through the truck, stealing 
the weapon. 

"No one is really to blame [for 
that]," said the sergeant. 

Wisnicwski cited all those 
who assisted with the arrests, 
including Round Lake Park and 
Grayslake police, as well as 
Mobile Eye volunteers, and the 
Lake County Sheriffs Patrol 
Canine Unit. 



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5U*ch 1,1996 UlcclANcf NcwspApcRS LAKELIFE Iflfl 



'Word of mouth' advertisement packs 'em in for GOPSA 



GLORIA DAVIS 

Staff Reporter 

A relatively unknown motion picture, "GOSPA" has been 
appearing in General Cinema Theaters in the Chicago area, 
one of only 14 markets in the country slated to show this low 
profile film, that Is inexplicably doing a land-office business 
spurred only byword of mouth. 

According to its distributor, the Penland Company, this 
unusual film is due to open exclusively in the Illinois, 



has large audiences glad they rushed to sec it 

Set in 1981 in a locale that couldn't be more newsworthy 
in 1996, the Dosnlan mountain village of Madjugorje, 
"GOSPA" Is directed by JakovScdlar, who is also the director 
of the Croatian National Theater in Zagreb. 

"GOSPA" is the inspiring true story of how a Croatian 
Catholic priest, played by Martin Sheen, protects six children 
who claim to have seen the Blessed Virgin- He also defends 
the rest of his congregation against Communist authorities 
Wisconsin, Indiana movie market on March 1. who attempt to ban gatherings at the sight of the apparitions. 

Jim Jansscn of the 12 Lakehurst Cinemas, said "GOSPA" Thousands of people have been making pilgrimages to the 
will be shown from Friday, March 1 through Sunday, March3. reported sites of the Blessed Virgin's appearances ever since. 



Showtimcs arc noon, 2:30, 5, 7:30 and 10 p.m. and from 
Monday, March 4 through Thursday, March 7 at 5, 7:30 and 
10 p.m. 

This $4 million dollar independently produced film will be 
depending mostly on the motion picture grape vine to bring 
in its audiences instead of the usual media blast So far so 
good because in markets like Los Angeles and Chicago's 
south side "GOSPA", which means "Our Lady" in Croatian, 



The Franciscan priest also stands with the children as the 
Communists interrogate them and have them negatively psy- 
chologically evaluated so that people will cease to believe in 
the apparitions. 

Then the priest gives a sermon publicly interpreted as an 
act of disloyalty by the Communists and is tortured in an 
effort to convict hint Michael York, who plays the priest's 
attorney, exposes, many flaws In the government's case 



against the priest 

The grass roots effort to draw audiences into the theaters, 
not only in the Lake County area, but nationwide, has been 
the most successful such effort in the last 20 years of motion 
picture releases. 

Pleased members of the audience have returned to the 
theater after seeing the movie and handed out pamphlets on 
the motion picture to persuade others to sec it too. 

These audiences arc often not the usual movie going 
audience. It is a quiet and thoughtful audience, many who 
seldom go to the movies, yet who have been drawn to 
"GOSPA" by the recommendation of a friend or many 
strangers via their church or the local media, etc 

Another selling method has been by putting word out in 
church bulletins and also selling movie tickets to large and 
small groups In advance. 

'GOSPA" is an inspiring story of the triumph of the sacred 
word in these days when going to a movie means experienc- 
ing extreme violence and often unbridled sex, or barrages of 
objectionable language. 



LAKELIFE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Learn ddem e, ancient Chinese secrets at Asian Martial Arts & Gym 



■.uiirx i j 






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wM 



1$$ 



V'' 1 '' 
\u* t 

Joe Williams of Round 
Lake Beach, left, spars 
with Tamirra Whitfield of 
Fox Lake in a dual of Kali 
Sticks, an ancient Filipino 
martial arts form. — Photo 
by Tina L Swiech 






I 



% 



TINA L SWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

Sense! (teacher) Harry Vombrack feels his martial arts gymnasiums 
reach a little further into a realm that most everyone can appreciate. 

At one time, if people wanted to get into the sport, it was either karate, 
judo or kung fu — pretty one dimensional 

Today there's a place that blends the various Eastern skills and self 
defense techniques that can provide fitness and be downright fun at the 
same time. 

Asian Marital Arts & Gym is located in two areas, both in Wauconda and 

a brand new facility mat Vombrack 
likes to call the "super school" in- 
Spring Grove 

Where Bruce Leo, Steven Seagal, 
lean Claude Van Damme, Jackie 
Chan and Chuck Norris domi- 
nate the silver screen, a brutal 
portrayal Is often featured which 
is not actually real life, says 
Vombrack. 

While the films can be highly 
entertaining with moves show- 
ing some exemplary forms, the 
S trainer warns, "Don't try this 
at home. These are done by 
\ professionals." 

The action kids will sec on 
[■ri-~c* \ the screen has been 

rehearsed many times over, 
i he said. 

Vombrack explained he 
received his first taste of 
martial arts as a child. "I 
came from a one-dimen- 
sional style. Thafs why I 
appreciate [the way Asian 
martial arts is taught]/' said the trainer. 
When it comes to self-defense, many schools instruct their students to 
punch, block, punch, block and so on. "You get out there in the real world 
and it's not like that What it really docs is give you a false sense of security," 
says Vombrack. "Any street fighter could pick you apart" 

The only true way to leam how to protect oneself is through full physi- 
cal contact, says the instructor. However he added this style may not be for 

everybody. 

While studentsat Asian Martial Arts may leam kick boxing or "sparring" 
as Vombrack prefers to call it, there are a number of downtown shows that 
offer similar events which lead to nothing more than bloody, barbaric 

brawls. 

"This gives martial arts a black eye," said Vombrack. What we do (here) 

is make the student technical. " 

There are two different styles of martial arts, either soft or hard, he 

explained. 

The hard kind refers to Japanese karate fighting which is more power- 
ful and avoids "sidestepping"— traveling from your opponent in cither one 

direction or another. 

Chinese kung fu involves sidestepping. It also incorporates the study of 
animals, which dates back to ancient China during the Shalon Temple peri- 
od. 

There are five different animal styles that Vombrack teaches his stu- 
dents. Just a few of them are the tiger style, the crane and the leopard. 

Women who are taught martial arts tend to do extremely well at the 
sport "Their body and structure is more in line with the moves," said the 

teacher. 

Now that Asian Martial Arts has branched out from its six-year 
Wauconda facility, to the suddenly booming town of Spring Grove, 
Vombrack's plans include reaching out into the community. 

Vombrack will be having a Youth Night where kids can come and direct 



their energy in a positive way. 

The owner is also making plans with the. Spring Grove Police 
Department to hold an Officers' Night where police can work out in the 
gym at no charge. 

"He's got the type of facility [for additional police training],** said Spring 
Grove Police Chief Don Rcgnier. "I'm sure we'll do something in the near 
future." 

Children as young as 3 can get involved in the classes at Asian Martial 
Arts, said Vombrack. 

One particular student who is now 20, has earned an impressive award 
for his skills, which hangs above the doorway of the Spring Grove facility 
office. 

Michael Ward received a prize belt in an Illinois Tat boxi rig competition, 
welter weight division. _ •rtuxxi'r- 

The martial arts menu at both schools offer such items as self defense, 
weapons defense, forms/ learatc, boxing, full-contact JcicJc boxing, 
wrestling, Shotokan, kung fu, and boxing 

There Is also an area which features state of the art equipment includ- 
ing stair-style gear and tread mills. 

When it comes to finding the right martial arts gym, Vombrack says the 
bottom line is "buyer beware." He suggests that people go to the schools 
and take a look for themselves. And "Don't talk to the owner, talk to the stu- 
dents," he explained. 

All too often instructors will tell you the details of his business after 
you've signed a contract, he explained. At the Spring Grove and Wauconda 
schools, there are no contracts to sign, said Vombrack. Everyone is wel- 
come to come and observe the school at any time. 

Right now the Spring Grove facility is offering some special introducto- 
ry deals as part of its grand opening. 

Call either the Spring Grove gym at (815) 675-3200 or the Wauconda 
school at (847) 526-6332 for more informatiorL 




Island Lake residents Brian Dietrich, left, and Nicholas Vombrack, 
both 11, show some self defense techniques while instructor 
Sensei Harry Vombrack. gives an explanation to the audience at 
the grand opening of Asian Martial Arts in Spring Grove.— Photo 
by Tina L Swiech " * 




3 IAKELIFE UkdANd Newspapers M/utck 1,1996 



-Kids Fare— 

Children's play 'Rapunzel' opens at CLC March 1 



Playwright Max Bush's popu- 
lar children's play "Rapunzel" 
will open at the College of Lake 
County March 1. Presented by 
the CLC Theatre Department, the 
play will be performed at 10 a.m. 
and 1 p.m. March 1; 2 and 7:30 
p.m. March 2; and 2 p.m. March 3 
in the CLC auditorium, 19351 W. 
Washington St., Grayslake. 

Tickets arc $5 general admis- 
sion and $3 for children. CLC stu- 
dents and alumni. Call 223-6601, 
cxt. 2300 for tickets. 

Adler offers drama camp 

Drama Camp will be offered 
at the David Adler Cultural 
Center for children ages 7 to 14. 



The camp runs for eight weeks 
from June 10 to Aug. 9 and will 
culminate with the performance 
of "You're a Good Man Charlie 
Brown." 

Children will be involved with 
all aspects of the production, 
including set and costume 
design, choreography, staging 
and acting. 

For more information call Jill 
Harkaway or Justine Vaughn at 
367-0707. 

Spring 'Explore' program 

Babysitting . certification, 
china painting, fencing, ceram- 
ics, computer games, nutrition, 
organizational skills and building 



self-esteem are some of the excit- 
ing line-up of spring classes 
offered by College of Lake 
County's "Explore!" program for 
junior high school students. 

Classes will be offered March 
9, April 13 and May 1 1 at CLC's 
Grayslake campus, 19351 W. 
Washington St All classes will be 
taught by CLC instructors 
between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 
with a supervised lunch period 
from 1 1:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. 

For more information call 
223-3616. 

'Aladdin' 

Marriott's Uncolnslilrc The- 
atre for young audiences will 



present "Aladdin" through 
March 30, and April 19 to May lfl. 

Performance times vary but 
include Wednesday and Friday 
performances at 10 a.m. and 
Saturdays at 1 1 a.m. 

Tickets arc $6 and arc avail- 
able by calling the box office at 
634-0200. 

'Family Day Sundays' 

Explore local history and tra- 
ditions with the staff and volun- 
teers of the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Lake County Museum 
at Family Day Sundays. 

Join other families in the 
museum's galleries for exciting 
family-oriented activities such as 



participating in a scavenger 
hunt, making a bookmark, creat- 
ing a memory game, or learning 
about African American history. 
Focusing on a different activity 
each week, Family Day Sundays 
will be held every Sunday from 1 
to 4 p.m. 

General admission to the 
museum Is $2 for adults and $1 
for youth ages 4 to 18. Reserva- 
tions are not required. The Lake 
County Museum is located in 
Lakcwood Forest Preserve on 
Rte. 176, just west of Fairfield 
Road near Wauconda. 

For more information call 
526-7878.— by RHONDA BET- 
RICK BURKE 




JUST FOR KIDS! 






•rn#ACfam^4? 





DaDDDDfinrWDDarflf 



by Hal Kaufman 




COURT CASE! Hoy, I thought wo were here to 
play basketball. What can you draw to complete 
the picture? Connect dots. 



A C C F 


M 1 J H I 


I X 


* K 


i Jl 


~D 


s W- 




l zzfc 




7 M 


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1 L. V 




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PLANET EXI A certain planet discovered by Wm. Herschel in 1781 was originally 
called Georgium Sidus. George's Star, after King George III. By what name do wo 
know it now? 

'snuun. to it mouh om 



PIECE CORE! A curious, do-it-yourself jigsaw puzzle 
is suggested for your amusement at right. Remove 
and discard one corner of a cardboard square (dot- 
ted lines of figure 1). Cut remaining portion (fig. 2) 
into four equal-sized L-shaped segments. Scramble 
these pieces and ask someone to use them to re- 
form the original square. 

Figure 3 shows how pieces may be deployed for 
a hollowed-out version of the original. 




- 3 - 




HOP-SKIP-JUMP 
DRAWING CARD 

ALL ABOARD for a hop. 
skip and jump drawing lesson. 
Simply draw lines in the diagram 
at left in accord with the following 
letter-number coordinates: 

Draw from 11-C to 11-D 
to 9-F to 11 -G, 11 -J, 10-G, 7-G, 

7-H, 6-G, 5-H. 

Add 6-G to 7-F to 7-E. 

Draw from 7-F to 8-G, 6-I, 
6-J, 7-K, 5-J, 4-K, 3-K, 3-L, 2-L, 
2-K t 1-1, 2-J, 3-J, 4-H, 4-F 
6-C, 10-C. 

Use a sharp pencil, draw 

straight lines. 

. Be sure to draw in accord 
with number and letter coordi- 
nates. 

Add a color or two, if 
crayons are handy. 



/tfi*»f fafirrnr* the international 

f/ffCfff vffCCf ® CROSSNUMOERGAME 

DIRECTIONS: ^ L%s 

Fill each squaro with a number, ono through nino. p] (&£(?■ 

• Horiionlsl oquaros should add to totals on right. 

• Varlical squnros should ndd to totals on bottom. 

• Diagonal squares through contar should add to 
total in upper and lowor right. 



TMEnE MAY DE MOnE 
THAN ONE SOLUTION. 

Today's Chaltonge 
Timo 2 Minutes 
58 Seconds 
Your Working 
Time Minutes 

Seconds 









7 


Jl 
22 


4 


^ 








9 




29 


5 




30 


31 1 16 1 26 


26 


31 



27 



Wishing^ Well 



® 




HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will rjlva you a 
message every day. It's a numerical puzxle designed to 
ipetl out your lortuns. Count lha letters In your first name. II 
the number of letters It 6 or moio, subtract 4. II the number 
Is tess than 6, add 3. The result Is your key number. Start al 
the upper left-hand corner and check one ol your key num- 
bers, left to right. Then read the message the letters under 
the checked figures give you. 



AREA 

Y N K H E B 



R K(C O 



CODE 503 

N Y W T R O 

R O F D E M 

D B T M K Z 

E G U E A O 

R V A L L I 



Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in 
all directions-forwnrd, backward, up, down and 
diagonally. 



Ashland Eugeno 

Bend Grants Pass 

Corvallis Medtord 

Crater Lake Mt. Hood 



lolutlon 



I G E E C A 

U S D N A L 

Q P M N D L 

E C O A Y X 

Q P N O G E 

J H D R A G 



bJ 



z o 



Pendleton 
Portland 
Redmond 
Salem 






Seaside 

Tigard 

Tualatin 



<nz 



f 



>J f 



> r. 



j> -i m 




(O J > J S%s*'-i \y>) tj > en ~5Q 
fo^O a ~i t- > z cj) 




Find at least six differences in details between panels, 

r=3 




[Tits IS lUAT W»i>£rL 
Buhl \joot OfmssA P\#P) 

LCOKS W0 TlDDAy "VJ 
sees WtfrJr ow/yA 
HEPPfcKJ A!EA> 
VteM5T>Ay 



'<t='T Bet** PbTrtkh 
-Me in ta\\l 
"TODAy Po$ 
AJfcXr WfeEtrS- 
BStCK-Tosw 



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JSpi.W SI 3JOSUOJ 9 pjSjCJ JJL* SUA! 

•pC3| i "c p;ppe ub sdejis jopincqg > pjjjij si jouitu msja 

■/«»>{ '£ 1U9J3IJJ!P SI ICH 'J 'PU3M0| SI JOS(A '\ :S5DU3J5JJIQ 



Birthday Parties • Fundraisers - Dare Skates 



It 's Fun!, ..And you may meet 

a very "Special Friend 99 

Village Skate Roller Rink 

(Next to Rogan's Shoes) 
Mundelein, IL 566-2120 



Birthday Parties - Fundraisers • Dare Skates 



. 



—- *—*.+* ' \ jl^ * t%0 Hi mii+ m -w+m 






MARch 1,1996 UldANcI Newspapers IAKELIFE 



mtm 




F. Y. I . 




r 



Eleemosynary* 

"Eleemosynary," a play by 
Lee Blessing that tackles 
familial relationships, will be 
performed by the University 
of Wlsconstn-ParksUlc's The- 
atre DcpL on March 1 and 2 at 
7:30 p.m. In Studio D Theatre, 
located on the ground level 
floor of the Communication 
Arts Building. Admission Is $7 
for adults, $6 for senior citi- 
zens. Tor tickets and information call 
the UW-Parksidc ticket office at 
(414)595-2564. 

Musical Journey 

"And The World Goes T Round," a 
lighthcartcd musical journey through 
the works of songwriters John Kandcr 
and Fred Ebb, will be presented by 
Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre, 10 
Marriott Dr., Lincolnshire, through 
March 31. Performances arc Wed- 
nesdays at 2 and Q p.m.; Thursdays 
and Fridays at B p.m.; Saturdays at 
5:30 and 9 p.m.; and Sundays at 2:30 
and 7 p.m. All tickets are S33. Senior 
citizens and students receive $10 off 
the ticket price for performances on 
Wednesdays at 2 and 8 p.m. and 
Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Reservations by 
credit card can be made by calling the 
box office at 634-0200. 

Stage Two presents... 

"Murder in the Men's Store," a 
wild comedy by Kyle J. Bunch and 
Michael K. White, will be performed 
by Stage Two, 410 Sheridan Rd.. 
Hlghwood, through March 2. 
Performance limes arc 7:30 p.m. 
Thursdays; 8 p.m. Fridays and 
Saturdays. Tickets arc $12 for adults, 
$10 for students/seniors, and $9 for 
groups of eight or more. For reserva- 
tions or details, call 432-7469. 

'Guys & Dolls' 

Music On Stage presents "Guys & 
Dolls," running Fridays and 
Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 
p.m. Show dates arc March 1, 2, 3, 8 
and 9. Performances arc held at 
Cutting Hall, 150 E. Wood St., 



Palatine. Ticket prices are $12 on 
Fridays and Sundays, $14 on 
Saturdays. Group discounts arc avail- 
able. For more Information and to 
order tickets, call 991-5990. 

Musical audition 

Auditions for Music On Stage's 
production of the musical comedy 
"Summer Stock Murder" will be held 
on March 4 and 5. Auditions arc by 
appointment at Cutting Hall, 150 E. 
Wood St, Palatine. Call Ann at 526- 
2493 for details/appointments. 

'Love Letters' 

CcntcrSlagc presents "Love 
Letters" at the Gorton Community 
Center In Lake Forest on March 2 at 8 
p.m. Tickets arc $10 for adults, $8 for 
seniors and children, and may be 
reserved in advance by calling 234- 
6062. 

'Mixed Emotions' 

"Mixed Emotions," a romantic 
comedy, will be performed by 
Laughing Stock Theater In Andre's 
StcakhouscMarch2,3,8,9, 10, 15, 16, 
17, 22 and 23. Tickets include dinner 
and the show Andre's Is located on 
Rte. 12 one-half mile north of Rtc. 173 
In Richmond. For reservation Infor- 
mation call (815)678-2671.' • 

Auditions 

Bowcn Park Theater Company Is 
holding auditions for William Shakes- 
peare's "A Midsummer Night's 
Dream" on Saturday, March 2, from 5 
to 9 p.m. and Sunday, March 3, from 1 
to 5 p.m. at the Jack Benny Center for 
the Arts, 39 lack Benny Dr., 
Waukegan. Prepare two contrasting 
two-minute monologues. Auditions 
are by appointment; phone 360-4741. 

Four one-act plays 

The Woodlands Academy Drama 
DcpL presents "Splinters — Around 
the World in About Two Hours," a 
compilation of four one-act plays: 
"Androclcs and the Lion," "Sorry, 
Wrong Number," "Curfew Shall Not 
Ring Tonight" and "Antigone." 



Performances arc 7:30 p.m. March 8 
and 9, and 4 p.m. March 10 In die 
Susan Saint James Performing Arts 
Center at Woodlands Academy, 760 E. 
Wcsllclgh Rd., Lake Forest Tickets 
arc $5 at the door. For more informa- 
tion call Catc Calhoun at 234-4300. 




Free concert 

The DcpL of Music at Lake 
Forest College will present a 
free concert on Friday, March 
1, at 8 p.m.* "Music of the 
Americas" will take place In 
the Lily Reid Holt Memorial 
Chapel. Call 735-5170 for fur- 
ther details. 

Folk concert 

Traditional and contempo- 
rary fo k music will be performed by 
Jim Craig and Douglas Udell at the 
Adlcr House Ballroom at 8 p.m. on 
Friday, March 1. Tickets arc $9 for 
adults, $6 for Adlcr members, senior 
and children under 16. Call 367-0707 
for Information or tickets. 

'Old Blue Eyes' 

David Paul, who performed as 
Frank Sinatra In "Sammy," a musical 
In Chicago, is singing every 
Wednesday at 8 p.m. at Muellers 
Harbour Lights on Grass Lake Road in 
Anlioch. 

Beethoven featured 

On March 1 and 2, the Lake Forest 
Symphony, under the direction of 
Guest Conductor Crafton Beck, will 
present an all-Beethoven concert, 
"Revolutionary Remembrances," fea- 
turing violinist Mark Lubotsky. The 
concert begins at B p.m. at Rhoadcs 
Auditorium, Finch University of 
Health Sciences/The Chicago Med- 
ical School, 3333 Green Bay Rd., 
North Chicago. Ticket price is $30 or 
S20 per person. For tickets call 295- 
2135. 

Tom Chapin performs 

Singer/songwriter Tom Chapin 
will present two concerts at the 
Woodstock Opera House on Satur- 



day, March 2. At 2 p.m., he will per- 
form his children's show, and at 8 
p.m. he will play an adult-orlcntcd 
program. Tickets for both shows are 
on sale at the Woodstock Opera 
House box office. For tickets or more 
information call (815)338-5300. 

Cabin fever Jazz 

Marshall Vcntc and his group 
Tropicale are the featured performers 
for the March 3 "Cabin Fever Jazz" 
concert at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake 
Forest. The concert will begin at 4 
p.m. Tickets arc $12. For further 
details call 234-6060. 

Concert for ALS 

The Oak Park Con cert Chorale will 
present a benefit performance 
Sunday, March 3, from 4 to 6 p.m. at 
Christ Lutheran Church, 607 Harvard, 
Oak Park. Tickets are $10 to $100 and 
proceeds benefit the Lcs Turner ALS 
Foundation. For more information 
and ticket purchase call 383-4742. 

Tribute to Bix 

A Tribute to Bix-Part VII will take 
place March 8 to 10 at Raffaclll's and 
the Hitch-Inn Post Motor Inn, Rtes. 
137 and 21, Libcrtyville. Celebrating 
jazz legend Bix Bicdcrbeck, the week- 
end Includes live concerts by Ralph 
Norton's Varsity Ramblers with Vincc 
Giordano, Jacobi's Bottomland 
Orchestra, and Lea LaBrca and her 
Flcxo Boys. Also featured arc rare jazz 
- films, records and sheet music Cost 
for the weekend is $58 for patrons, 
S22 for Individual concerts and $5 to 
SO admissions for other exhibits. For 
further information, call the hotline at 
362-4016 or write to Tribute to Bix, 
Box 7791 , Libcrtyville, IL 60048-7791. 

'The Pied Piper* 

A jazzy performance of "The Pled 
Piper," with special guests Tales and 
Scales, will be presented at Orchestra 
Hall on March 9. This family concert 
of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra 
is offered in cooperation with the 
McHcnry County Youth Orchestra 



Community Arts Center. Tickets are 
$33 and are available by mad or at the 
MCYO-CAC office, 64 E. Crystal Lake 
Ave., Crystal Lake, IL 60014-6137. Call 
the MCYO office at (815)356-6296 for 
further details. 

Concert/art show 

The Zion Chamber Orchestra will 
present "A Slavic Sampler" concert 
March 2 at the Christian Arts 
Auditorium, Dowic Memorial Dr., 
Zion. The evening begins with the 
ZCO's 12th Annual Art Show and 
Contest at 6 p.m. with the concert fol- 
lowing at 8 p.m. Ticket prices arc $7 
for adults, $5 for senior citizens and 
students, and $3 for children. For 
more information call 872-4803. 

Textile exhibit 

The David Adlcr Cultural 
Center presents "Textile as 
Ritual/Narrative" through 
March 2. Featured in the juried 
exhibition will be the latest 
work in the textile media. 

Local artists 

Local artists and writers are 
featured in a Donnelley 
Library exhibit at Lake Forest 
College through March 8. Lake Forest 
artist Franklin McMahon, Decrfictd 
photographer Art Shay, the late 
Quaker sculptor Sylvia Shaw Judson 
of Lake Forest and lllinoisan writer 
Donald Culross Peauie arc featured. 
The public is invited to this free show- 
ing from 0:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. 

Anderson art exhibit 

The Anderson Arts Center, 121 
66th St., Kenosha, continues its cur- 
rent show through March 3. It fea- 
tures quilter Kay Sorenscn's works, 
Milwaukecan Susan Simensky 
BleUla's collection or 15 Van Dyke 
prints, and "The Parturitio Images" 
from Kenosha artist Diane Levesquc. 
The Arts Center is open Thursday 
through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Call 
(414)653-0481 for further details. 
See FY1 page B10 




Lakeland Newspapers/RMC Theatres 



Entries must be postmarked no later than 
Friday. March 22, 1996 

:ed In your March 29 lisus of the Lakeland Newspapers. 



Winners announced In your 



Antioch Theatre* 

LitoertyvHI^ Th©atre» 

McHonry Theatre 

Show Place* Theatre. Crystal Lake 

Grayslake Outdoor Theatre 

McHenry Outdoor Theatre 

Dunes Theatre. Zion 

Lake Zurich Theatre 



From 



Movie 

RMC Theatres 

14 Winners!* 

1st Prize- 12 Admissions 3rd Prize-6 Admissions 

2nd Prize-8 Admissions 4th Prize-4 Admissions 

10 Runners Up-2 Admissions Each 

NO LIMIT! 

Enter as many times as you want. 
'Note: In case of tie, earliest postmark will determine winner. 



|1. Best Picture 

Apollo 13 

Babe 

Braveheatt 

The Postman (IL Postino) 

Sense and Sensibility 

!■■■■■■■■■■■ 

1 4. Best Supporting Actress 

Joan Allen-Nixon 

Kathleen Quinlan-Apollo 13 

Mira Sorvino-Mighty Aphrodite 

Mare Winningham-Georgia 

Kate Wirslet-Sense and Sensibility 
■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

7. Music Original Score 

"Colors ol the WEntf -Pocahontas 

'Dead Man Walknf-Dead Han Walling 

_"Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman'-Oon Juan DeMarco 
'Moorighf-Sabrina 

"YouVe Got a Friend*-Toy Story 



■ 2. 



. Nicolas Cage-Leaving Las Vegas 
Richard Dreyfuss-Mr. Holland's Opus 
. Anthony Hopkins-Nixon 
. Sean PenrvDead Man Walking 
. Massimo Troisi-Tbe Postman (IL Postino) 



15. Best Supporting Actor 

| James Cromwell-Babe 

I Ed Hams-Apollo 13 

'' Brad PHt-1 2 Monkeys 

1 Tim Roth-Rob Roy 

Kevin Spacey-The Usual Suspects 

Mmm ■■■■■■■■■■■ 

■ Mail your ballot to: 



Susan Sarandon-Dead Man Walking 

Elisabeth Shue-Leaving Las Vegas 

Sharon Stone-Casino 

Meryl Streep-The Bridges ot Madison County 

Emma Thompson-Sense and Sensibility 

■ ■■BH 

est Di 

Chris Noonan-Babe 

Mel Gibson-Braveheart 

Tim Robbins-Dead Man Walking 

Mike Figgis-Leaving Las Vegas 

Michael Radtord-The Postman (IL Postino) 

!■■■■■■■■■■■ 
Lakeland Newspapers Academy Awards Contest 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



Name _ 
Address 
Phone 



r 




3 LAKELIFE UktlANd Newspapers March 1,1996 






From page B9 

Figurative exhibit 

Chicago artists Tom Doud and 
Steven Hudson, recipients of the 
1994-95 Arts Midwest/National En- 
dowment for the Arts Visual Artist 
Painting Fellowship, will exhibit their 
figurative paintings and drawings at 
the College of Lake County. The exhi- 
bition will open March 1 with a recep- 
tion from 7 to 9 p.m. and will contin- 
ue through April 7 In the CLC 
Community Gallery of Art at the 
Grayslakc campus. Exhibition hours 
are 9 a.m. to 10 p. m. Monday through 
Thursday, D a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday 
and Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. 
For more information call 223-6601, 
cxt. 2240. 

Basket making 

David Adlcr CuIturaTCcntcr pre- 
sents a basket making workshop with 
Judy Pilzl on March 2 from 10 a.m. to 
2 p.m. Cost Is $45, which includes 
basket supplies. Students need to 
bring a tape measure, pencil, scissors 
and a towel. To register call 367-0707. 

Postcard exhibition 

The David Adlcr Cultural Center 
and the Lake County Museum's Curt 
Telch Postcard Archives present 
"Postcard Art/Exhibition '95," open- 
ing March 3 from 1 to 4:30 p.m. at the 
Lake County Museum. The exhibit 
will run through the month of March. 
Call Justin Vaughn at 367-0707 or 
Dcbra Gust at 526-3638 for details. 

Faculty exhibit 

A variety of works hy Lake Forest 
College art department faculty will be 



featured in an exhibit at the 
Sonncnschcln Gallery of the Durand 
Institute, corner of Sheridan and 
Dccrpath Roads in Lake Forest The 
public is invited to the opening recep- 
tion on March 5 at 7:30 p.m. The 
exhibit runs through April 5 with 
gallery hours 2:30 to 5 p.m. daily. For 
further information call 735-6010. 

Needlepoint class 

Monica Larson will teach needle- 
point on March 12 from 1 to 4 p.m. at 
Gorton Community Center, 400 E. 
Illinois IM, Lake Forest. The fee is 
$30; bring embroidery scissors. 
Interested persons should register In 
advance; call 234-6060. 

Square dance 

An old time square dance 
will be held at 8 p.m. 
Saturday, March 2, at the 
American Legion Hall, 715 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville. 
The Slumpjumpcrs will pro- 
vide the music, with Tony 
Scarimholo calling. Call 367- 
0707 for further details. 

Combined singles 

All singles are invited to a joint 
dance sponsored by the Combined 
Club Singles at 8 p.m. on March 2 at 
the Holiday Inn Rolling Meadows 
Hotel, 3405 W. Algonquin Rd. 
Admission is $6. For more informa- 
tion call 209-2066. 

Walk PT Dodgers 

The Walk N' Dodgers Square 
Dance Club Is holding a beginners 
dance on Sunday, March 3, at Viking 




Park Center, 4374 Old Grand Ave., 
Gumce. Cucr Doris Palmcn will start 
rounds and line dancing at 6:30 p.m. 
Ron Smcjkal will call In-class level 
squares at 7 p.m. Call 336-0959 for 
more details. 

Singles dance 

The Northwest Suburban Singles 
invite all singles to a dance at 7 p.m. on 
Sunday, March 3, at The Bam of 
Banington Restaurant, 1415 S. 
Barrington Rd. There will be Dj dance 
music. Admission of $5 includes a buf- 
fet dinner. Call 786-B688 for details. 

Suburban singles 

The Metro Suburban Singles 
Invite all singles to a dance at 7 p.m. 
on Wednesday, March 6, at The Barn 
of Barrington Restaurant, 1415 S. 
Barrington Rd. Music will be provided 
by Music Makers. Admission of $5 
includes snacks. For more Informa- 
tion call 509-5000. 



LU 



m 



FJL Wright lecture 

Fans of Frank Lloyd 
Wright's unique architectural 
vision will want to mark their 
calendars for Wednesday, 
March 6. Restoration archi- 
tect John Garrett Thorpe will 
present a lecture at 4 p.m. in 
Room 330 at Barat College's 
Main Building. Thorpe is a 
renowned architect who has 
consulted on the restoration 
of 45 Frank Lloyd Wright buildings 
and over 40 additional Prairie hous- 
es. This event is open to the public. 
Call 234-3000, ext. 4250 for further 
details. 



SpEciAl Events — 

Harlem Globetrotters stop at Rosemont 

The Harlem Globetrotters Invite fans to Join In the celebration of the 
1996 "Bring You the World" 70lh Anniversary Tour. The Globetrotters 

Rlay the International All-Stars on March 1 and 2 at the Rosemont 
orlzon. Tickets are $9.50 to $16 and arc available at the Horizon box 
office or all Tickcimastcr outlets; phone (312)559-1212. 

Building material sale benefits Habitat 

A building material and home Improvement sale to bencllt Habitat 
for Humanity Lake County will be held Saturday, March 2 from 9 a. m. to 
1 p.m. at Lorrcll Business Center, 1 mile south of Buckley Road (Rte. 137) 
on Hwy 41 In North Chicago. Many new and used items, including new 
light fixtures and paint, will be on sale. For more details call 623-1020. 

NSCA to host spring banquet 

The Northwest Suburban Christian Academy (NSCA) will host a 
spring banquet, "Seeds for Success," at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, March 2, at 
the Evangelical Free Church of Wauconda, Rtc. 176 and Anderson Road. 
Call the school at 526-8673 for free reservations. 

Practical plans for spirituality 

"A Day of Practical Plans for Spirituality in Your Ordinary Life" will 
be presented by Vicariate I of the Archdioccsan Council of Catholic 
Women on Saturday, March 2, at St Anastasia Parish Center, 634 N. 
Douglas Ave., Waukcgan. The day wUI begin with registration and conti- 
nental breakfast at 8:30 a.m. and ends with Mass at 2 p.m. Cost Is $15. 
Call 546-2861 for further information. 

Options for People holds dinner dance 

Options for People, Inc. will hold its Tenth Annual Dinner Dance on 
Friday, March 8, at 7 p.m. in the Imperial Ballroom of Chicago's 
Fairmont Hotel. Options for People assists Chicago's long-term, hard- 
core unemployed in breaking the cycle of welfare dependency. For more 
details call Dan Williams or Claire Wishard at (3 12)670-0470. 

Work with an architect 

The Chicago Chapter of American Institute of Architects is sponsor- 
ing a public seminar, "Working with an Architect," on March 9 from 1 to 
3 p.m. at Apple Tree Theater, 595 Elm PL, Suite 210, Highland Park. Pro- 
registration is required. Call (312)670-7770. 



Cuneo Museum open for guided tours 

The Cunco Museum and Gardens offers tours ofl8 rooms of the lav- 
ishly furnished, circa 1914 Italianatc mansion designed by Chicago 
architect Benjamin Marshall. The estate originally was the home of 
Samuel Instill, one of the wealthiest and most powerful businessmen 
to live in Chicago at the turn of the century. 

From 1937 to 1990, the mansion was the home of the John F. Cunco 
family. John Cunco Sr. bought the estate in 1935. He was a prominent 
Chicago businessman and philanthropist, founder of Cuneo Press, 
Vlawthom-Mclody Farm, and many other businesses. The museum col- 
lections contain valuable old master Italian paintings, Capo di Monte 
porcelain, American and European silver and exquisite Oriental rugs, 
Flemish tapestries and Continental antique furniture. All the furnish- 
ings- were owned by the Cuneo family when they lived in the mansion. 
the Cuneo Museum and Gardens Is open Tuesday through Sunday 
from 10 sum. to 5 p.m. Admission is charged. For further information 
call 362-3042! 



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Just Engaged? New Parent? Moved? 

Antloch 

Joretta Jan 

B3B-3430 395-0783 

Fox Lako/ 

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Spring Grove 

Jill Jennifer 

587-8050 740-3030 



Grays lako 
Wlldwood 



Kim 
566-9536 



Linda 
223-1607 



Gurnoo 

Patti 
223-6498 



Lake Villa 

Deanna 
265-0608 



Lako Zurich 

Ann 
540-5790 

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Green Oaks 



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680-1590 



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263-8339 






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Janet 
587-5709 



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949-6167 438-0287 



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566-4263 



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223-8504 546-1564 



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Doris 
660-7276 



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872-1706 

You are entitled to a complimentary 
subscription from your hometown 
newspaper. To receive your paper, 
contact your Welcome Wagon rep- 
resentative or call Lakeland News- 
papers at (847) 223-8161. For in- 
formation about positions with the 
Welcome Wagon call Marina at 
(847)729-9817 



MaocIi 1,1996 Ukf.lAN(l Newspapers IAKELIFE 



•; 



t. v'-J 



The truth about dinnertime 



Dinnertime is highly overrated. 

Yes, I know that there arc 
experts out there who would dis- 
agree with me, experts who sing 
the praises of 
family dinners as 
a means to bond 
with our children 
on a nightly 
basis, experts 
who say that din- 
nertime should 
be a sort of family 
group hug, com- 
plete with good 
food and enlight- 
ening conversation. 

But what I want to know is, just 
whose house is it that they've been 
eating at? The Cleavers? It certain- 
ly couldn't have been mine, 

Not that we don't try, of 
course. We begin by making "gro- 
cery list time" a group event. 
Every week, I call the family 
together and announce that I'm 
making up the grocery list 

"What would you like for din- 
ner?" I say. 

Almost in unison, they answer 
"I don't know." (Or, my personal 
' favorite, "Surprise me.") 

Still, with or without their help, 
trying to choose the perfect meal 
is a difficult proposition, at best 
With five people in our house — 
two adults, a 17-year-old, a 6-year- 
old, and a 2-year-old — it is dam 
near impossible to please the 
palates of a group this eclectic. 

Actually my husband and 
myself are pretty easy to please, 
except that we both agree that 
green peppers and onions arc 
gross. This no doubt has a lot to 
do with why we chose to get mar- 
ried. But the children are another 
matter. 

Wc have die 17-year-old, also 



known as "Jack Sprat" since he 
will no longer eat any fat, which 
means he's pretty much on his 
own in a house where his baby sis- 



LIFE'S 

A 
BEAR 

DONNA ADEAR 




tor eats butter right out of the tub. 
Choosing to skip dinner 90 per- 
cent of the time, he prefers instead 
to walk in and out of the kitchen 
while wc cat, pausing only to 
hover over my plate in order to 
provide an in-depth analysis of 
the fat grams in my meal. 

Then wc have Brandon, our 6- 
year-old poster boy for Ethiopia, 
who thinks food is a dirty word 
unless it costs under $1 and is 
sold on shelves in the Quik Mart. 
Okay, I'm exaggerating just a 
touch— he will cat hot dogs or 
spaghetti. Unfortunately, we do 
not eat hot dogs or spaghetti 
every night So when other meals 
are served, he prefers to practice 
his acting skills in lieu of eating— 
"Ohhh, my stomach hurts. But I 
know you said I have to eat my 
dinner, right? / just hope 1 don't 
throw up. Oh. Oh. Ohhhhhl" 

And, last but certainly not least 
in terms of her power over the 
entire dinner experience, is 2- 
ycar-old Samantha. In her case, 
wc have to choose meals that can 
be easily removed from most 
washable surfaces. (I say M we have 
to choose" because she considers 
a jar of olives and several finger- 



fuls of butter to be a balanced 
meal choice.) From her high chair 
(affectionately known as "the 
throne"), she is capable of using 
mere signals to 
convey her feel- 
ings about the 
meal. For 

instance, a plate- 
ful of food held 
aloft and tipped 
slightly sideways 
near the edge of 
the. high chair 
tray means "1 am 
going to throw, 
this all on the floor if you don't 
watch. ..oops, too late!" 

Despite all of these obstacles, 
I sometimes manage to find a 
meal that everyone likes. When I 
do, I try to make enough for a sec- 
ond meal later in the week, so 
that wc can all enjoy it again. 
However, whenever I announce 
that tonight's dinner is "left- 
overs," everyone suddenly finds a 
reason why they can't be home 
for dinner, or they're "too full 
from lunch." Even our 6-ycar- 
old, who can't remember what 
they're called, hates leftovers. 
Recently, upon seeing that I was 
cooking chicken, a meat we'd had 
earlier in the week, Brandon 
groaned loudly, "CHICKEN! Oh, 
no— not RERUNS!" 

I guess the experts were 
wrong, at least in our case, when 
they said that dinnertime should 
be a bonding experience. It's 
actually a religious experience, as 
evidenced by the fact that my 
husband and I have now taken to 
praying before each meal: 

"Please, God, let us finish eat- 
ing dinner before Samantha 
attempts to do a somersault from 
her high chair. Amen." 



CLC celebrates Women's History Month 






Five lectures and a dinner the- 
atre will highlight the College of 
Xake County's celebration of 
^Vomcn's History Month in 
[March, sponsored by the CLC 
[chapter of the American Assn. for 
(Women in Community Colleges. 
£Thc programs will be presented 
fat CLC's Grayslakc campus, 
[19351 W. Washington St. 

'1 "he programs are as follows: 
"Feminist Ethics" from 12:30 
| to 1:30 p.m. March 5 in room 
C002. Barbara Solhcim, CLC phi- 
losophy instructor, will discuss 
the inception of feminist ethics 
and what distinguishes it from 
traditional western moral dieory. 
"Choices in Midlife" from 
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. March 12 
in the auditorium. Author Paula 
Hardin will explore the issues fac- 
ing people in their middle years 
and how their choices impact not 
only the quality of their lives and 
future but also tire lives of others. 
"Women's Liberation Move- 
ment in China" from 11 a.m. to 
noon March 13 in room C002B. li- 
hua Yu, CLC sociology instructor, 
will take a look at how Chinese 
women have lived, worked and 
participated in the Chinese soci- 
ety in the last 50 years. 

"Quilters," a dinner/ theatre 
presentation on March 19 In the 
auditorium. The dinner will be 
served at 6 p.m., followed by the 
theatre production which cele- 
brates the legacy of America's pio- 
neer women and their domestic 
craft of quiltmaking. Tickets for 
dinner/theatre arc $25 general 
admission, $23 for CLC students, 
staff and alumni. Tickets to the per- 
formance arc $10 general admis- 
sion, $8 CLC students, staff and 
alumni. Call 223-6601 ext 2300. 
"Cultural, Political & Social 



Issues of Women in Native 
American Communities" from 7 to 
9 p.m. March 21 in the auditorium. 
This is a lecture/music presenta- 
tion by Pamela M. Alfonso and 
James Ycllowbank. 



"In a Different Voice" from 
11:30 am, to 12:30 p.m. on March 
20 in room C003, presented by 
Nancy Bcntlcy and Brian Spruill. 

For information, call 223-6601, 
ext 2581. 



Trip Cancellation Insurance 
Do I Need It? 

by JIM WARNKEN. 

PRESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Tomorrow's the day the family leaves tor the dream cruise everyone's been planning on 
for so long. Little Johnny hasn't been feeling well, so you figure a quick trip to the doctor 
before the trip Is a good precaution. 

Then you get the news. Johnny's got the measles! 

Looks like the vacation Is going to be put on hold for awhile, But, surely you're not going 
to loso all the money you paid for the cruise. 

tf you didn't purchase trip- cancellation Insurance, It's quite likely you will. 

Now, let's say Utile Johnny's measles didn't show up until the third day of the cruise, 
about the time you're due to dock In Aruba. A one-way air ticket back could cost over $600. 
Again, If you had purchased trlp-cancollal Ion Insurance, you probably would be reimbursed 
for (he cost of getting the family homo and maybe even the cost of the unused portion of 
tho cruise. 

Have you ever thought about what would happen If, let's say you get to the airport, the 
fog rolls In and tho 'Right Delayed" messages start flashing on the doparture boards. Eight 
hours later, your piano leaves the gale. Problem Is your ship Is also leaving the port In 
Miami. What now? 

Again, most trlp-cancetlallon policies will pay for a hotel room that night and a plane lick- 
el to meet your ship at the next port. 

Keep In mind all trip-cancellation Insurance policies are not alike. Far Irom It. 
Most will cover cancellations for Illness of travelers as well as Illnesses or the death of 
a family member . Also covered are unforeseen events such as Jury duty, a flat on tho way 
to the airport, a house fire, or an airline strike. Keep In mind though, most do not cover 
•pre-existing" conditions. For oxampto, H you have a heart condition, and you have to can- 
cel your trip because of complications of that Illness, most policies are not going to pay. 

There are some "cancel for any reason" plans, but they are much more costly than S5 to 
$7 per Si 00 of coverage of the standard plans. 

When purchasing trip-cancellation Insurance, Insist that your travel agont explain what 
■ Is, and what Is not covered. If the Insurance ottered directly through the cruise line or tour 
operator Is not to your liking, ask to see another plan. Most travel agencies work with at 
least a couple of Independent Insurers offering a variety of policies. 



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usTc Notes 

by Greg May 



jvi 

Celebrate 10 years at Christi's 

On Saturday, March 2, Christi's is celebrating their 10th year 
of rocldn' Lake County. Hosted, by owner John linger and long- 
time house band Easy Action, this is one party you won't want 
to miss! Free food and drink specials will be offered throughout 
the night 

One of the main reasons that Christi's attracts some of the 
best local bands is John Unger's way of dealing with bands. His 
integrity and encouragement are rare these days in the music 
business. Many of the current working bands have been formed 
by individuals attending his weekly jam sessions every 
Wednesday night, hosted by Easy Action. On behalf of all the 
musicians that have benefited by working with John, I'd like to 
say congratulations. 

Easy Action will be starting about 9:30 p.m., however, I'd get 
there early to get that "good seat" Christi's is located at the cor- 
ner of Rte. 83 and Grass Lake Road in Antioch (395-2885). See 
you there! 

Weekly jam sessions/open mike 

Tuesday, Kristoff s in Round Lake Beach, hosted by Redeye 
Express, call 546-2512 or 587-5525; Wednesday, Christi's in An- 
tioch, hosted by Easy Action, 395-2885; Wednesday, Offsides in 
Mundclcin, hosted by JD Alton, 949-6240; Thursday, Paradise 
Beach Club in Round Lake, hosted by Redeye Express, 546-8880 
or 587-5525. 

live music 

Friday: Christi's, Antioch— RG and the All Stars, 295-2885; 
Deep End, Lake Villa — Black Alley Blues; Slice of Chicago, 
Palatine— Michael Coleman & the Backbrcakers, 991-2150. 

Saturday Christi's, Antioch — 10 Year Celebration with Easy 
Action, 395-2885; Grand Tracks, Lake Villa— Evolution Blues Band, 
356-3535; Kristoff s, Round Lake Beach— Phantom Reign, 546- 
2512; Paradise Beach Club, Round Lake — Main* Stage, To Be An- 
nounced, 546-8880; Poor Richard's, Gumec— To Be Announced, 
244-2290; Side Outs, Island Lake— To Be Announced, 526-7174; 
Tappers, Johnsburg— Empty Pockets, (815)344-2344; Yacht-Seas, 
Fox Lake— Nick Laramie and the Groove, 587-9562; Ye Olde Town 
Inn, Mount Prospect — Red Eye Express, 392-3750; Slice of 
Chicago, Palatine— Studebaker John & the Hawks, 991-2150. 



ffpw&J~f% 

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Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 

Adults '8*; Students & Seniors *6* 

Call for Reservations 

847-395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main SI, Antioch 

Box Ofllce Hours: Starting March 4 

Mon. thru Ttiurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Sat. 1 1-2 

l 1/2 hrs. before showlimes. Reserved Scaling. VISA/MC 

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LAKELIFE UIceIanc] Newspapers Maach 1,1996 



-Movie Pick 



'Beautiful Girls' about immature boys 



Despite the title and the pres- 
ence of more than one heautiful 
girl, the newest 20ish-30ish sin- 
gles saga, "Beautiful Girls," is 
filled with the same old "getting 
too old for this nonsense" guys 
who do their own thing, travel 
around a lot, drink a lot, and talk 
a lot about how smart they think 
they arc by refusing to grow up. 

This singles scenario stars an 
aging Timothy Mutton, who, 
despite a lot of innate talent, 
seems to have peaked several 
years ago in his first big film, 
"Ordinary People," A raft of 
undistinguished pictures and 
equally mundane roles is partial- 
ly to blame for his to-date so-so 
career. 

In this one we have Hutton, 
who left a non-descript New 
England town, to go on the piano 
bar circuit. He is in a quandary 
about whether or not to marry his 
New York girlfriend before his 

Spring hoedown 
in Grayslake 

An old time barn dance, the 
"Spring Hoedown," will be held 
7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 9, at 
the Park District Buildings, 42 S. 
Seymour in downtown Grayslake. 

This is the fifth in the current 
series of traditional bam dances 
presented by the Grayslake Com- 
munity Park Dist. the second 
Saturday of the month. Barn 
dancing differs from modern 
"mainstream" and "plus" square 
dancing in that there is always live 
music and the dances arc tradi- 
tional. Cosnime is not important 

All age groups, with or without 
partners or square dancing expe- 
rience, arc invited to attend the 
barn dance. When needed, the 
old time figures will be walked 
through before dancing. 

Admission is $4. For more 
information call Uncle Roy at 
223-20B1. 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



| ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
473-4200 



QOSPA(PQ) 
1 Fr-Mo. 12;00. 2:30, 5:00. 7:30; Tu-Th 5:00, 

7:30-Schools or Churches please call lor 
I further Info regarding group rates and/or 
| Special Vie wings 



I MR. HOLLAND'S OPUS (P0.} 
" -Wo 2:00. 5:00, 6:00; Tu-Th 5:00, 8:00 



1 CLOSE AND PERSONAL IP0 13) 

J Fr-Mo 12:00, 2:30. 5:00. 7:30, 10:00 
Tu-Th 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 



CITY HALL (R) 

Fr-Mo 1:45, 7:20, 9:50: Tu-Th 7:20, 9:50 



|UNFORQETTABLE(R)5.oo 



BLACK SHEEP (PG 13} 10.00 



MR. WRONG: (PQ 13) 

Fr-Mo 1:00. 5:15. 7:20; Tu-Th 5:15. 7:20 



RUMBLE IN THE BRONX (R) 

Plays on two screens, 

Fr-Mo 1:00, 3:05, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 9:30, 

10:00; Tu-Th 5:30, 7:45, 9:30. 10:00 



MUPPET TREASURE ISLAND (PQ) 

Fr-Mo 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:30. 9:30; 
Tu-Th 5:30. 7:30. 9:30 



MARY REILLY (R) 

Fr-Mo 1:00, 3:15. 5:30, 7:45, 10:00; 
Tu-Th 5:30, 7:45, 10:00 



DOWN PERISCOPE (P0 13] 

Fr-Mo 1:10, 3:20, 5:30. 7:40. 9:50; 
Tu-Th 5:30, 7:40, 9:50 



BEFORE AND AFTER (P0 13) 

Ff-Mo 1:00, 3:10, 520, 7:30, 9:40; 

Tu-Th 5:20, 7:30, 9:40 



| BROKEN ARROW (R) 
Fr-Mo 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:00; 
Tu-Th 5:30, 7:45, 10:00 



HAPPY QILMORE (P013) 
I Ff-Mo 1:15, 3:20, 5:25, 7:30, 9:: 
Tu-Th 525, 7;30, 9:35 




Timothy Hulton and Natalie Porhnan 



30th birthday so he goes home for 
his 10th class reunion. 

As usual, Matt Dillon, the 
town lady killer, is still hanging 
around two-timing his present 
girl, Mira Sorvino, with his mar- 
ried ex-girlfriend, Lauren Holly. 

I lutton docs a lot of expound- 
ing about life with teenager 
Natalie Portman and another vis- 
itor, Uma Thurman. There is a 
mental attraction between 
Hutton and the teen Portman 



which is out of place in this adult- 
toned flick and wc could also 
have done without Rosic 
O'Donncll who, along with her 
irritating big mouth, is also out of 
place in a movie titled "Beautiful 
Girls." O'Donncll's dialogue and 
persona resemble much of her 
stand- up comedy routine 

This one can wait for video. 
Wc give this unspecial R-rated 
flick 2.5 out of five stars. — by 
GLORIA DAVIS 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-7410 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



C 
E 

c 

E 
E 
B 
C 



$1.50 all seats all shows 

ThtWifn S-:i in 

DON'T BE A MENACE TO 
SOUTH CENTRAL (R) 

F- lTjti.-h.-j J'S-7J0-»iO 
Su I Sx 1 tt>1 '.11 IM »! O My 1 U-i «■! JM « 

im ;»-»j At 
ACE VENTURA 

WHEN NATURE CALLS (PQ13) 

fi iTbn.Jhtn 
su i&r 115-1 •<'. ti-no-tu 



Ample Parking 



WH«r*)F Hsufcn I Arjtli Bum 

WAITING TO EXHALE (R) 

n Uy->.i i H-7 «■; M. 5»i l&si 2004M-7M-!* 

DUNSTON CHECKS IN (PQ) 

Ffl l-.»i-TV> 5J0.SU »S*n 1 10-]IM!0.M:i J1Q-510 
RAtiCenr JoiPiia In 

CASINO (R) 

ttttDa 



li- 
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Presents 



Mondays- All Seals S1 .00 
(I All Seats $2,00 



fVither'of'the'br 



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Sorts Friday - M-fri. 6:00 & 8:00; Sat & Sun. 3<.00-5:00-7:00 

^ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW— 

Every Sa t. Nite 11:30 p.m. ***** 

Admissions $5.OO/$3.00 In R.H. costume or w/mititary I.D. 

FOR INFORMATION. CALL 566-5444 



> € 



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% 



MOVIES & TIMES START FRIDAY. 3/1/96 



■6 SO fcttl AltH 5 p M i 3 SO OMm ( It 1 UnJ«] 



i50 Diiry Afternoon Showi 
► Mon.-Fri.lil, 5 p.m. 



"4 OO Adulti. "2 OO ChiWiBf, 

(11 & under) 

'2O0Djw mnMal]rw» until S OO p m 



UP CLOSE AMD PflSOIUL 

12 4B3S0-8SO-02S (PQ 13) 



DO WW PEUSCOPE 

12 15-5 006 00 ft IS 



RAPFT 6UM0KE 

100-4 00-7 00-0 15 (PG1 3) 



warm TiLtwiE isuuii) 10 

Fri. 645-0.00. Sal. ft Sun. 2:15^:00 6 4S OO 
Mon.-Thun. 7:30 



MCHENRY INDOOR THEATRE * 

J2U3 CU~.it St' ' * 

. . ' ■ (B16) 3B5-0144 ' -j. 



» £?n duns; '?; 00 CWd ' cf ' <» 1 * ""del) 
Z.OO Bargain Malmao Sal. & Sun. Ill 5;(X) 



MUPPCT TUASUK KUWB 

J2L 



200-4 3&0 404)10 



MS. HOUAMD 5 OPUS 

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' n . Won -ll.in 8 45 
R«l e.V«wy 4 15145 



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12 3 0-3 30-6 30-0 00 IR) 



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FB.. Mon -Iriun 6 30. R>l tSun ?bQf)3Q 



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LIBERTY 1 & 2 
362-3011 

70B N. Mllwnukoo Ave. 
Llbortyvilla 



AduBs '4"; ChiUron 11 & Under *2-. 
Bargain Malinoe Sal. A. Sun. "Tit 2;3Q . »2**- 



(PQ13) 



MJUtY KOliY 

620-8 10 (R) 



HUPKTS TtEASUtl B1AMB (Q) 

Fit- 6 30-B4S. S«L ISun 2 00-4. 1 5-0 30- B 45 
Mon -Thui* 7.1 S 



12:15-3 00-6 00-130 



(R) 



BUKMSMSP (PG13, 

Fri 45-000, S«i LSun. 2 30-4 30-0 45-e 0O 
Mon -TTwnv 7.30 



• * * * * * • 



Be ThERE 




Solo events ..' '...: :•-- 

Join Solo on March 1 Tor liicir First Friday Dance at the Princess 
Oanqucts, 1200 S. Milwaukee Ave., Llberlyvlllc, from B p.m. to midni&ht. 
On March 7, Solo plays fun volleyball at Carl Sandburg Middle School, 
055 W. Mawlcy SL, Mundclcin, at 7 p.m. For more Information on any 
Solo events, call the hotline at 223-7902^ 



SATURdAy 



Christian Singles hold pot luck dinner 

Christian Singles will meet March 2 lor a Christian Emphasis Night, 
beginning at 5:30 p.m. with a pot luck dinner and continuing with a 
Bible study. The Christian Singles Group (age 50 and up) is composed of 
those who arc widowed, divorced or never married. The group is non- 
denominational and welcomes visitors and new members any time.' 
They meet at Calvary Temple, 450 Keller Ave., Waukegan. Call 244-1632 
or 244-4304 for further information. 



C 



Tu 






Embroiderer's Guild sets meeting 

Quilt artist Yvonne Porcclla will be the guest speaker at the North 
Suburban Embroiderer's Guild meeting on March 5 at 9:30 a.m. The 
guild meets at the Village Presbyterian Church, 1300 Shcrmcr JM, 
North-brook. Call Toklko Blaine at 255-7545 for Information. 



ThuRsdAy 




; ---; 



Blue Lite Singles to meet 

The Blue Lite Singles will hold their regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. on 
March 7. There will be a speaker. For more details call 623-5706 or 623-1 147. 

Mom's Place offers support 

Mom's Place offers weekly meetings for moms and their young chil- 
dren, ages Infant through preschool. An on-site child care program Is 
also provided at no charge. Meetings are held on Thursdays in 
Inglesldc. Call Sharon at 263-2200 for further details. 



r 1 GURNEE CINEMA h - 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL • 847-855-9940 


SH. CIT. SPECIAL S2.50 WEDS & FRI AFTERNOON. BARGAIN MATINEES - ADULTS MiO BEFORE 5:30 

CHILDREN UNDER 6 NOT ADMITTED TO "R" RATED FEATURES 

FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 23 THROUGH THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 29. 1996 


DOWN PERISCOPE NO PASS OR MFT. 


pan 


nt-JU 11:25-1.40.1 OOT.KHJO; UO-TH J.CO-7:1»W0 


UP CLOSE AND PERSONA!, 


pan 


FR-SU t:J04 1 51 JM »: U-TM 15-1 551 JO 


BEFORE ft AFTER 


PQ13 


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HUMBLE IN THE HflOX 


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BROKEN ARROW-NO PASS OR MFT. 


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MUPPET TREASURE ISLAND 


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F-IU IH.154 J>I4M;B-TH«:10I «5-l 


HAPPY QILMORE 


PQ13 


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MARY REILLY 


R 


HU 1404 104i(H:1J:t»-Tm:10l 50t:1J 


PITY MALL. 


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MU IJ;101 304 50-T11>UJ:l*.TH4 50-7:10-1 B 


MR. WRONQ 


PQ13 


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Ma HOLLANDS OPUS 


PO 


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BLACK SHEEP 


P013 


f-IU11:45-l.45i:l0-7JOMftM-THJ:lO7:»l40 


UNFORCIETTADLE 


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LEA VINO LAS VE0A5 


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FtU 11:151 U-7;70I45; U-TH 7:33-1 U 


BABE 


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F-IU 1:101.155 JO. U-TH S:10 


DEAD MAN WALK IN Q 
*1 -, 


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FTH 7:15145 

4 









FOX LAKE THEATRE (847)< 

115 Lakeland Plaza ■ Fox Lake * cemad 



PLAYING Mar. 1 - Mar. 7 



(847) 973-2800 i^ $' 



CENA0MI5SI0NS5 



MUPPET TREASURE ISLAND (o) 

DP BaaBH B Fri. 5:20 • 7:40 

SaL/SuniMonAVed. 12:30 • 2:45 • 5:20 • 7:40 

TueyThur. 5:20 • 7:40 



D0WNJPERISC0PE (po-13) 

cp r^-^ gp pri. 5:15 • 7:50 1 9:55 

Sat/Sun. 12:15 • 2:55 • 5:15 • 7:50 • 9:55 
MonJWed. 12:15 ♦ 2:55 » 5:15 • 7:50 
Tue/rhur. 5:15 • 7:50 



MARY REILLY (r) 

DDr^^HB Fri. 5:00* 7:30* 9:50 

SatiSun. 12:10 • 2:35 • 5:00 • 7:30 • 9:50 

Mon-AVed. 12:10 • 2:35 • 5.-00 • 7:30 

TueTThur. 5:00 • 7:30 



BROKEN ARROW (h) 



aa^m Fri. 5:10 • 7:35 • 10:00 

SatJSun. 12:20 • 2:40 • 5:10 • 7:35 • 10:00 

MoniWed. 12:20 * 2:40 • 5:10 • 7:35 

Tu8./Thur.5:10»7:35 







illMORE (PO-») F „ 5:30.7:45.10=05 

SatTSun. 12:40 • 2:50 • 5:30 • 7:45 • 10:05 

MonAVfld. 12:40 • 2:50 • 5:30 • 7:45 

Tue/rtiur. 5fl0 • 7:45 



MONDAY MATINEES FOR PULASKI DAY 



CiNtplEX OdEON ThEATRES 




CMMUU<(», 



RIVERTREE COURT 



S 



Mr. Holland's Opus U'G) (Dolby Sicreo) 
Fri.. Tu«»-Thura. 630-9:30; Sat.-S»n (12:30) 3:30-6:30-9^0; Mon. ( 12J0-3J0) 63Q-9JQ 



Doivu Periscope (I*G13) (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri.. Tuo-Tliuw. 7:20-9:50; S.it.-Sun. (2:10) .1:25-7:20-9^0; Mon. (2:15-t:25) 7:20-9:50 



Before And After (rcia) (Dolby Stereo) 

Fri.. Tuc-ITt. 7:20-955; Sat.-Sun. (2:00) 4:-l5-7:2Q-935; Mon. (2: (XM:45) 7:20-9:55 



Fri., Tue-TIi 7M 



Up Close & PtTSOllrt/(PG13) (Dolby Stereo) 
rm-9-ASs Srtt.-Son. (1^0) 4:25-7:05-9:45; Mon. (t:5Q-l 



25) 7:05-9:45 



Sense and Sensibility d'G) (Dolby stereo) 

Fri., Tue.-Th 6:40-9:35; S.it.-Sun. (12:45) 3:4Q-<i:40-9 J5; Mon. (12:45-3:40) 6:10-9:35 



Dead Man Walking (R) (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri., Tuij-Th 7:00.9:45; S.U. St Sun. (1:25) 4:05-7:00-9:45; Mon. (1:25-4:05) 7:00-9:45 



Mary RciU\/(ll) (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri., Tui--Th. 7:15-9:40; Sat.-Sun. (1:45) 4:25-7:15-9:40; Mon. (1:45-4:25) 7:15-9:40 



City Hall (KHDTSSltrco) Fr i ..Tue.-lh 7:10-^40. SjL &5urv tMB^WfelO^MMJ (1JQ4:15) 7:109.-10 

HAWTHORN CENTER ] 



,. . T . Rumble In The Bronx (K) (DTS stereo) 

Fri., Tuf.-niu 7:4.S.«>-AS F g.,. *. c„ n , <1:4 5> 3:45-5:45-7:45-9:45; Mon. (1:45-3:45) 5:45-7:45-9 45 

_, _. — Broken Arrow Wi 

— Fri., 1 tio-Th 7 1)0- 9-10; S.it.-Sun. (2:00) -1 30-7:00-9 30; Mon. (2:00^130) 7:00-9:00 

Mr. Wrong (i>Gi3) 
Fri., Tia-Tiui 7:15; Sat.-Mon. (2:15) 7:15 



Leaving Las Vegas (R) 

iri-i Ttie-Tli 9:50 ; S.it.-Mr»n ( A;4$) 9:50 



fh t.. t> ii&SEHP- Gilt »°re (FG13) (DTS Stereo) 
•No FAsiH* m ' lu «"Ttt7J*M.4D,Sil. AtSun (I.OO)l:10-5iO-7Jfr9.40;Mt«. (l:OtW:10-5J0) 7JO*40 



March 1,1996 LaIceIancI Newspadcrs LAKEUFE 



I 



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):50 
hZO 
1.20 



3:00 
0:00 
7:35 
7:35 



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3-9:30 



-<>:50 



:55 



:15 



■9:35 



9:45 



J:40 



[0-9.JO 



:45-9:45 



1:00 



a 



Horoscope 




ARIES (March 21 to April 19) 
You must be self-reliant this 
week as most people around 
you have a tendency to let you 
down. All In all, though, It's a 
happy week where Interests of 
the heart are concerned. The 
weekend Is favored for getting 
out and having fun. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 
A family member needs your 
help early In the week. On the 
job front, you meet with new 
chances to get ahead, thanks to 
the departure of a co-worker 
who recommends you for a pro- 
motion. De sure to pay close 
attention to details. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) 
You could have some unan- 
swered questions about a 
job-related project this week. 
However, In general, It's a good 
week for shoring up your posi- 
tion In business. Be on the alert 
for opportunities for advance- 
ment. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) 
You arc correct to feel that a 
close friend is not telling you the 
truth. This person Is obviously 
prevaricating, and you're puz- 
zled as to the reason for this. In 
romance, you need to keep your 
feet planted firmly on the 
ground. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) 
Before taking any action, be sure 
that the signals you're giving 
others arc crystal clear. You 
could have* difficulty midweek 
making up your mind about a 
sticky situation. Seek out the 
help of a close friend. The week- 
end brings happy socializing. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) Things could be 
a bit off-key where job interests 
arc concerned early in the week. 
Some people arc difficult to 
reach by phone, so send a letter 
instead. On the domestic front, 
you can do no wrong and It's 
smooth sailing. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 



October 221 It's a week of 
mixed trends for you on the 
financial scene, Later In the 
week, you'll be receiving some 
good news about money. Still, 
you need to be careful of those 
who would take advantage of 
your generous nature and your 
kindness. . 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) Early In the week, 
give a loved one enough free- 
dom to do his or her own thing. 
Don't be too demanding with 
this person. Later, the two of you 
share happy times together. 
This weekend, enjoy leisure 
events. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 
to December 21) You could be 
dealing with someone who Is 
evasive this week. However, 
matters relating to education, 
travel and publishing are happi- 
ly highlighted. The weekend 
finds you confident and assured 
and ready for any social situa- 
tion. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 
to January 19) Deceptive trends 
require care In financial deal- 
ings this week. What you think is 
a sure thing turns out to be any- 
thing but. However, It's a good 
time for making progress In 
business. Important develop- 
ments occur now. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) Not everyone you 
deal with this week Is on the 
up-and-up. However, commu- 
nications with a laving tic 
couldn't be better! Later In the 
week, try to address what's 
making you irritable. The 
weekend sees you stepping out 
for good times. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) You receive good 
news about a financial matter, 
but on the work front, there's an 
clement of confusion this week. 
The weekend favors you sharing 
happy times with your family. 

Ol 99G by King Features Synd. 



CrossworcI 




'MARTIN SHEEN 



35SS 



MICHAEL YORK MGRGaS FAIRCH1LE® 











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Tried in a Crucible of Hatred... 
He became an instrument of The Message. 



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■V, a brilliant and committed performance 
Sheen as one of the most 
recent years... 
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Amnw-pAS-TV 



F'S*»r*f I ~2j 





i&'&K 



Tla- True Story of a (teal Life Hero. 



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EXCLUSIVE LIMITED ENGAGEMENT 

FRI.-MON. 12:00-2:30 

5:00-7:30 

TUES.-THURS. 5:00-7:30 



GENERAL CINEMA 



LAKE HURST 12 




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ACROSS 

1 Tropical 

rodent 
5 1773 jetsam 
SOllic'spal 

12 Culture 
medium 

13 LBJ pooch 

14 "Hi, sailorl" 

15 Unadulterated 

16 Stately tree 

17 Confines 

18 Einstein 
20 "Hoorayl" 

22 Fat farm 

23 Lead-in to 
plunk or 
plop 

24 Berra had a 
hand in it 

27 Not coastal 

32 Tray 
contents 

33 Japanese 
drama 

34 Cubbies' 
home 

35 Brunch 
•entree 

38 Vcme 
seaman 

39 Gear part 

40 Love seat 
occupancy 

42 Platonism, 
e.g. 



45 Vacationer's 
car, maybe 

49 "Sad to 
say..." 

50 Onassis 

52 Twecty's 
home 

53 Ready for 
action 

54 Mauna — 

55 Gumbo base 

56 Rock band's 
equipment 

57 90-degrec 
engle 

58 Average 
DOWN 

1 Throe 

2 Novelist 
James 

3 The God- 

father" cast 

4 Studio star 

5 Chatteris 
hero 

6 Serpentine 
sea dweller 

7 Host 

8 Soldier who 
digs 
trenches 

9 1968 Miller 
play 

10 Top-rated 

11 AMEX 
counterpart 



19 Awake 

21 Mamie's man 

24 Long March 
leader 

25 Doctrine 

26 Wallace Beery 
movie (1931) 

28 -Wayne's 
World- 
expletive 

29 Kafka work 

30 Resistance 
unit 

31 South 

American 
resort city 

36 Untethers 

371 

38 Sargc, e.g. 

41 Lindbergh 
book 

42 It's a long 
story 

43 Reticent one 

44 Talk-show 
hostess 
Ricki 

46 Snatch 

47 Pearl Mosque 
site 

48 Incline 
51 Kinsman: 

abbr; 



-CrIt.c's ChoicE- 

'Beast on the Moon' poignant play 




Mervon Mehta and Albena Dodeva in a scene orphaned Armenian immigrants, playing at Apple 
from "Beast on the Moon/' a play about two Tree Theatre in Highland Park through March 10. 



"Beast on the Moon," an 
involving play about two 
orphaned Armenian immi- 
grants whose parents were 
slaughtered by the Turks in. 
1915, is especially poignant 
today with the ongoing conflict 
between Armenians and 
Azerbaijans in the background. 

Richard Kalinoski's fine play, 
at Apple Tree Theatre in 
Highland Park through March 
10, is set in the Milwaukee, Wis. 
home of Aram and Seta 
Tomasian between 1921 and 
1933. 

Each in their own way is try- 



ing to escape from the emotion- 
al horror of losing their families 
during the 1915 slaughter. 
Aram, a photographer, hides his 
grief in a portrait in which the 
heads of his parents and sib- 
lings have been excised. His 
game plan is to fill those empty 
faces with his mail-order bride. 

Aram is quickly disabused of 
his belief that "nothing happens 
without planning." 

Mervon Mehta and Albena 
Dodeva, in the leading roles, 
eventually prove ideal mates, 
but only after a long period of 
adjustment do they come to 



understand one another. "Beast 
on the Moon" shows in a power-' 
ful, emotionally touching way 
how that relationship evolves 
into one of equality and mutual 
respect. 

Ryan Gravelle is buoyant as 
Vincent, a neighborhood Italian 
land who is foundering in a 
local city-run "home" for 
orphans. And William Weyl han- 
dles the narrator's role with 
quiet dignity. 

This is a well-crafted, note- 
worthy play. Ticket information 
is available at 432-4335.— by 
TOM W1TOM 



I 




LAKELIFE UkclANd Ncws|)a|)ehs MabcIi 1,1996 



) 



. 



Mings of China 
specializes in Chinese 
food at its finest 

Ming Lin, owner or Ihc brand new Chinese restaurant, 
Ming's of China, next to the Grand Palace Banquet Hall he 
also owns, located at 5572 Grand Ave. in Gurncc, is no 
newcomer to the restaurant business. He has owned and 
operated the very successful Ming's Mandarin Restaurant 
in Schaumburg for 15 years. 

In welcoming customers to this new Chinese restaurant 
that serves both mild Mandarin and spicy Szechwan food, 
manager Richard Wang guarantees guests will enjoy Ming's 
warm and friendly atmosphere, its gracious service and, 
"the best Chinese food within a 25-milc radius." 

Hungry visitors are urged to try General Tso Chicken, a 
battered chunk style chicken served in a spicy sauce over 
steamed rice at $9.95, or Mongolian Beef, sliced beef and 
onions cooked in a brown sauce and served over crispy 
noodles at S8.95. For a family meal for four, at SI 3.50 a 
person, a grand Chinese meal begins with a House ofBobo 
Platter, an appetizer tray made up of six different appetiz- 
ers; Sizzloin Rice soup; four entrees, Mongolian Beef, 
Kungpao Chicken. Sweet and Sour Pork, and Mooshu Pork. 

"Our homemade noodles arc a house specialty," adds 
Wang, urging customers to try the noodle soup, noodle flat- 
ter with chicken, shrimp, scallops and shrimp. The Dragon 
and Phoenix, at $13.95, is a sumptuous shrimp and chicken 

combo. 

If Fortune Cookies aren't enough dessert for you, Wang 
suggests you try a bit of Lychcc fruit, a crunchy fruit from 
southern Asia, to end your meal on the right note. 

Ming's of China is open from Monday through Thursday 
from 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m., on Friday and Saturday, from 1 1 :30 
a.m. to 1 1 p.m., and on Sunday, from 1 1 :30 a.m. to 9:30 
p.m. Call (847)-662-2929 for reservations and more infor- 
mation. 




: casual ptntng in A Unkjua Atmosphere • ChMrarrs Menu ♦ 
: HeseivalJwtB for 6 or Mora • Banquet FacfiMtos tor 20-1 66 P«opto] 

rfgjgB 625 ROCKLAND RD. (Rt. 176) 



t re. T!i 




LAKE BLUFF 

847-234-6660 

Mon.'Thun. 11 a.rcv-10 p.iTL, 

Fit/Sat. 11 a.nv-12 pjn., 

Sun. 4-10 p.m. 



WKWIElfiWUI 



Baaasaaa 




%Hoducin 3 Thc all new 

Sunday Champagne Brunch 
at Holiday Inn Mundelein 

Sunday 10:30 am - 2:30 pm 




Chef's Selections 
Include: 



Reservations Strongly 
Suggested! 

$13.95 Adult 

$10.95 ScniorCiLieni 

S4.95 Children 5-12 yrs. 



• Full Salad Bar • Omelettes Made 

• Assorted Juices & lb Order 
Fruit Bar • Chef Carved Round 

• Fresh Bakery Items of Beef W/Au Jus 

• Honey Glazed Ham 

• Bouquetiere Of 
Fresh Vegetables 

• Peel & Eat Shrimp 

• Dessert Island 
Extravaganza 




• Eggs Benedict 

• Bacon, Sausage, 
Hash Browns 

• Broiled Cod 

• Stuffed 

Chicken Breast 



510 E. Rt. 83, 
^^ Mundelein 



949-5100 




Where To 
Eat Out 



-v. 



Gram 



ftyafc 






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*^3g£$8jif 



FEATURE 

OF THE 

WEEK 




W 



Mandarin and 
(Szechwan Cuisine 

The NEWEST & BEST Chinese dining experience in Chicago 
& Suburban area. Come and feel the ADVENTURE of a warm 
atmosphere, gracious service, the BEST Chinese food. 

Mings of china 

Featuring: 

SUNDAY BRUNCH BUFFET 
11:30 - 2:30 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 




5572 Grand Ave. • Gurnee, IL 60031 

(847) 662-5597 

Fax:(847)662-6099 ' 



& 



Gurnee 
Mills 



Hampton Ion 




m 



ATTENTION 
ADVERTISERS! 

Ask your local Advertising 

Representative 

About 

HOT SPOTS 

Premiering March 15 




Dining on the Lake... 

GAIESMETH 



On 



Diamond lake 



Specialise In 

BARBECUED RIBS 

since 196} 
A GALE Sl'REET TRADITION 



A Casual Country Atmosphere 
Fresh Seafood, Prime Rib, Prime 
Steaks and Chops, an Award 
Winning Salad Bar and 
Tempting Desserts. 

LUNCH & DINNER 

Party and Banquet Facilities (20-200) 

Sbow Lounge - Daadag 

Now appearing - HIE RICH & SHELLY SHEPPARD SHOW 

906 Diamond Lake Rd., Mundelein 
566-1090 



Woodlands Academy Mothers' Club breaks the ice 



The new loft studio of noted 
photographer John Reilly was the 
setting for the Woodlands 
Academy Mothers' Club 
"Icebreaker" party. 

The "Icebreaker" party was the 
prelude to the Mothers' Club 
annual benefit, Cong6, which will 
be held at the school on April 20. 
Although it may appear so, this 
winter's arctic temperatures were 
not an influential factor in choos- 
ing this year's theme, "Polar 
Exploration," according to Conge 
Co-chair Debbie Reed of Lake 
Forest. "It was purely a coinci- 



dence," she remarked. 

Even though spring will be well 
under way when Conge rolls 
around in late April, Woodlands 
will enjoy an arctic blast when the 
campus is converted into a polar 
campsite for the auction and din- 
ner. Those planning to attend 
Conge" but arc concerned about 
the cold need not worry since the 
Conge" Committee guarantees die 
auction action will generate 
enough excitement to keep die 
campfires burning. 

Plans for the 23rd annual 
Conge have been a year in the 



making. "The enduring success of 
Cong6 is the result of much hard 
work by a team of dedicated par- 
ent volunteers," explained Pam 
Wenzel, development coordinator 
and a Woodlands' graduate. "The 
proceeds raised from Cong6 play 
a very Important role in maintain- 
ing die quality of Sacred Heart 
education," she added. 

One of die much talked-about 
oral auction items this year Is a 
1996 candy apple red Chrysler 
Sebring convertible offered by 
Knauz. Motors of I-ake Forest. Also 
new on the auction block Is a 



stereo jukebox with over 160 orig- 
inal 45 RPM records. The unique, 
hand-stitched Woodlands quilt is 
being designed and assembled 
this year by freshman parent and 
trustee Carole Sandner of Lake 
Bluff. 

Also back by popular demand 
are the student parking space, 
reserved front row seating at grad- 
uation, and the New Orleans-style 
Cajun dinner prepared by 
Woodlands Trustee Sister Sharon 
Karam and Headmistress Sister 
Claude Dcmoustier. There are 
also the ever-popular skyboxes, 



sports tickets and vacation pack- 
ages, as well as the $10,000 Cash 
Reverse Raffle. 

The word Conge means "play 
day" in French, and the original 
Cong6s were surprise play days 
organized by the Religious of the 
Sacred Heart for their students. 
Today at Woodlands, Conge" is the 
major fund-raising event orga- 
nized by the Mothers' Club. 

Tickets to Conge* are $125 per 
person. To make a reservation, or 
for more information, call the 
Congd Hot Line at 431-2233, or 
Pam Wenzel at 234-4300. 



•; J 



MarcIi '1,1996 WccIawJ Newspapers LAKEUFE 



I 



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pack- 
i Cash 

"play 
riginal 
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of the 
dents. 
Ms the 

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25 per 
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!33, or 



Where To 



Eat Out 



FEATURE 

OF THE 

WEEK 




JB 




ST. PAT'S 



SHOW PARTY 



AJSnaOATCLMMGC 
fMLOMOlAJU 

Comedy Show • Dinner • Open Bar 

SATURDAY, MARCH 16th 
— By Reservation Onty— 

Featured Comedians Dinner Chokes 

Bob Rumba •<*iekrn Wellington 

Nitioitnv spou k* Kcno«tUi "filet Hlgnon 

•Hid-cfl comic i vttifiiwjit* • lobster Tail 

•Prime Rib 

•20 Ox, Porterhouse 

AH Entrees Includo Soup, 

Coasar Salad, Baked 
Potato, Rolls and Butter 




Located On Rollins Rd., Inglcsldc 
Overlooking Beautiful Long lake 

847-587-3211 



Celebrate Sabatini's 49th year 
with a great champagne brunch 

The Sabatini family, owners of the Sabatini Restaurant 
and Frigate's Lounge on Long Lake, invites everyone to 
join in the year long celebration of the 49th anniversary of 
the start of their business. 

Three generations of Sabatinis have been in the 
restaurant business since 1947, Ralph Sabatini states, 
"You'll always find a Sabatini on the premises!'' Even the 
chef, Ralph Rossi, is a cousin haling from Italy. Although 
the restaurant -is an old and honored one, the menu is 
new with a variety of Italian specialties mixed with out- 
standing steaks, ribs and fresh fish. 

Sunday's Champagne Brunch, which is served from 
9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., includes unlimited champagne, and 
fruit juices. Adults can indulge in the brunch for $8.95; 
seniors for $7.95, children 6-10 years for $3.95, and chil- 
dren, 3 to 5 years old arc $2.95. 

Wednesday and Thursday evenings senior citizens 
can dine on a complete dinner that includes soup and 
salad bar, plus potato and dessert and alcoholic or non- 
alcoholic beverage for $6.50 

Thursday' dinner special is Surf and Turf (filet andlob- 
stcr) for$12.95. Other Thursday specials are pizza and the 
variety buffet which includes salad bar and dessert for 
$5.95. Another Thursday special is a 20 oz. Texas T-Bonc 
steak for $9.95. Also on Thursday and Saturdays, 
Sabatini's all-you-can-eat crab leg special fqr $18.95 is 
very popular. 

Friday night's traditional Fish Fry includes a pasta bar 
and a stir fry buffet. The stir fry and pasta is prepared to 
order from a large selection of toppings: fresh shrimp, | 
Calamari, beef and chicken and fresh vegetables, all for 
$0.95. Seniors arc $7.95. 

Sabatini's Restaurant and Frigate Lounge also has 
banquet facilities that accommodate up to 200 people. To 
. reserve a date, call (847) 507-3211. 

Make Sabatini's the place you spend St. Patrick's Day 
weekend, and you're guaranteed a great time! . On 
Saturday, March 16, a comedy show with Bob Rumba and 
Will Shone will be featured. A dinner/ comedy package is 
available that includes dinner, the comedy show, and an 
open bar from p.m. to 1 a.m. for only $48 per couple. For 
more information, call 587-3211. 




During Lent, Come In For A Variety Of Fish, Shrimp, 
1-2 Lb. Lobster Tall Featured On Our Regular Menu 

Friday* Only 

full pound king cbab legs 

only- $21.95 

Valid F ridifi n(y Now Through Good Friday 

'M and 'M Wlnnar of Bast itoaka 

Watch Oox Cfcaf Cook Yaw ttuk To Parfacttrat 

RIBS-SEAFOOD-PRIME RIB-CHICKEN 



-■ 



1818 N. Grandwood Drive <i n, " ,w "' ' 

Gumee -Binqwti 




356-5200 



•Party Pirns kttllW* $ 
•CHIfrcn'tUenu 



1)2 



Ctited 



2ZZZ233EQ 



£ 



Dining 
Room 
•CocfcfaU Lounge 

• Catering 
•Banquet tstdlilirs 




LENTEN SPECIALS 

ALASKAN KINO CRAP IEOS 

1 FULL LB. $ II / • * * 

PRANCE ROUCHY 

FLORENTINE 

$10.95 

PEEP FRIED LOBSTER 

$1 5.95 



interested tn a cruise this year? 

MERS Cruise Night Party 
, . ■• March 6-7 p.m. ' 
r FREE HORS D'OEUVRES 



313 E. LIBERTY, WAUCONDA 
"Overlooking Beautiful Bangs Lake" 



847-526-6905 



Hillside Family Restaurant 

Where Meals Are Homemade! 



lh Takemoor 




looking For A Ckoage?^ 
Tiy Our New Menu Item 



vl^l 



I Country 

ried Pork Chops 

Lamb Chops Wilh Small 



Ala Carlo 


Dinner 


6.55 


s 7.55 


Salad 


...J9.95 



eEMOftCnUBTB 
SfCULMEMJ 

from 1 1 im- 
1p.m. Patty 

Laa 



HILLSIDE FAMILY RESTAURANT 



! I f I ifUlihm .1 FJt ■! . i rjB'TMlan h I'Klhi .(J 



DAILY 

'SPECIALS 





548-1008 , 



FULL SERVICE BANQUET FACILITY 
FOR GROUPS UP TO 850 

UNPARALLELED SPECIALTY CUISINE Si ELEGANT 

ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Our highly experienced staff cares that your 

event will rise above 61 beyond your expectations 

NEW! FRESH! CLEAN! VERY COMPETITIVELY PRICED! 

•Weddings 'Corporate Functions 
•All Types Of Private Parties 

Lakomoor Banquets located fust 1 1/2 mites west 
of Rt. 12 in Lekemoor. Only 5 minutes from 
, y- Grayslake. f*A 

(^(81 5) 385-9869 or (81 5) 385-0999 g^ 



■^cuUa/tco's 



( Tmtiotia di donaponli 



* + * I J l-iiir lUiiiith < in* 



apontng tn 
L Sunn 



Match 
I s G/i> 



OPEN ; Tu os.-Sa!. at 5:00 p.m. • Sun. 4:00 p.m. • Closed Monday 

Cany Outs & Banquets Available •Accepting Reservations 

(847) 395-8883 * 883 Main St., Antioch, 1L 




FAIRMONT SHORES 

RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 

rfv*v &e oeit /vAt ieofet m- /own 

587-1900 

Q$p» naven> C lived Gl 'uowve tried our,.. 
•Jimmy Burgers 'Blackened Chicken Sandwich 

•Chicken Wings •Carolina Burgers 

•Cajun Fries •THE BEST RIBS *Much Morcll 

•Southern Style Fish Fry on Friday {JJ6.95 
Includes Black Beans & Rice 



Obtcd Man. 
Open Tun , Wed. A Th ur 1 1 1 4 pm.; 

Itv, S*i. A Sun, il 1130 ml 
Kllcbea Open W. A SiL ill nadrigU 



Tike Route 59 lo BaM Eagle Rd 

(Between Monaville & Grand Ave.) to 

Lakcshoie Dr.-right to deadend. 




Chinese Restaurant 8* Lounge 




SERVING LUNCH g DINNER 

LUNCH BUFFET 

Monday thru Friday 

(Lakchurst Location Only) 



OPEN 
DAYS A 
WEEK 

.■™y!ki..-M2S!"»" - - — 



V*^^}'^ 








•mTfffTniffiifrinil^'rr'nf 



"TWT 



TERRY'C 

I MEXICAN W 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

Vote d # 7 




LENTEN LUNCHEON SPECIAL 

Enjoy Our Delicious 

FISH PLATTER 

MONDAY thru FRIDAY 

FRIDAY ONLY 
(ALL-U-CAN-EAT!) 



^v+^JFnidAy & SATURdAy Dinner 

i Innovative^ • CfcipoiU RoASTEfJ Duck 
t Gourmet \ • RoASTEfJ PorI( 

t • RoASTEd BeeF TENdERloiN 

Thu Eamts Are RuWy Ddiciovs! 




HOURS: 
UON-FR111 AM -10 PM 

SATURDAYS PM - 10 PM 
• CLOSED SUNDAY 



PRIVATE ROOM 

AVAILABLE! 

• No SMokinq Aac* 
1 HANdicApped Accessible 



ERRY'C 

MEXICAN W 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

IS LOCATED IN IHE *«W1£Y COMMONS SHOPPING OMR 566-95^0 

125 N. SEYMOUR • MUNDELEIN, IL fax »*.»j»o 




CARRY-OUT 



AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA,* 



T~ 



ffiyS COUNTY UkrlANcI Newspapers MarcIi 1,1996 




SUBSCRIBE TODAY-SET 2 MONTHS FREE 

f 

60 Issues for $24.50. That's 14 months of uninterrupted home delivery, for the price of 
12 months. Current subscribers can renew and take advantage for this special offer! 

For more information, call 847-223-8161 



Name 



Address 
City/Zip . 

Phone 



Exp. Date 



Visa/MC # 

Signature 

Mail To: Circulation Department, Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 

New Renewal Check which newspaper you want to receive. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 






I | Antioch News-Reporter 
I I Fox Lake Press 
I I Grayslake Times 
I I Gurnee Press 
□ Lake Villa Record 



| | Lake Zurich Enterprise 
CD Libertyville News 
I I Lindenhurst News 
I I Mundelein News 



| Round Lake News 
Q Vernon Hills News 
□ Warren-Newport Press 
I 1 Wauconda Leader 






Offer Expires 4-30-96 



9 



ANTfOCH PUBLIC Lit: 

1,1996 LAklANd NcwspA|7c§> 7 filiAites/REAL ESTATE 



MaucU 1, 1996 LAlcElANd NEwpA^roaWftSS/RgAL ESTATE j 

Job seekers find a helping hand at their fiflgertips 

SUZIE REED I iri-u „ SSr.-k i . - ^ Jt 



SUZIE REED 

Staff Reporter 

A new type of resource is available to bring employers 
together with job hunters over the telephone lines. Hire 
Performance offers an automated service that saves both 
time and money, said co-owner Linda Smith who serves as 
manager of operations. 

"Employers love the idea," she said. "It's a real advan- 
tage for them. It's a streamlined process." 

A toll-free number— 1-800-391 -I HUE [4473]— connects 
a job seeker to an automated program. A friendly voice 
explains the process, and the applicant is led through a 
series of questions requiring answers using the keypad 
numbers ... "If you ... press 1 ..." Eventually, of course, the 
caller must state his or her name. 

Questions include areas of interest, the type of position 
sought, training, background, experience, and pay 
requirements, said Smith, who has extensive experience 



herself in human resources, recruitment and career con- 
sultation. Her partner Dominic Tuchschercr has knowl- 
edge of requirements for general manufacturing as well as 
trade skills. 

"He has worked at finding people work in trades; we 
knew he would he a tremendous help in that area," said 
Smith, whose knowledge of office procedures balance the 
business. 

The positions offered by Hire Performance are 
those not generally listed through employment agen- 
cies, who charge rather significant fees, Smith said. Not 
in higher management areas, the jobs arc generally 
described as support staff, such as office help, techni- 
cians, clerks and data entry specialists. Tradesmen and 
retail sales people arc also apt to find compatible posi- 
tions through Hire Performance. Those who feel they 
don't fit in to any of the interest areas arc invited to call 
the general office for career counseling at 847-038- 



6823, or fax a resume to 847-838-6821. 

The process is a great time-saver for employers, espe- 
cially smaller businesses, eliminating frequent phone calls 
from applicants who may not be qualified for a particular 
position. Employers pay a start-up fee of $200. Hire 
Performance will advertise the position. Based upon the 
answers determined in the automated system,. five quali- 
fied applicants are referred to each prospective employer. 
If no suitable match is found, another list is put together. 
Additional hires arc provided for a moderate cost, Smith 
said. 

Employers who arc frequently approached by hopeful 
job seekers can give them a card with instructions on how 
to access Hire Performance. She and her partner will do 
the rest. 

"Businesses can get the best qualified candidates for 
that position," said Smith. "Applicants know up front what 
the pay structure will be." 




ESTATE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



1 



4 





Career changes 

Real estate pros on 
the move RAGE C2 

Fitness 
education 

Barat College hosts 
health fair PAGE C5 

Money matters 

Timely tips offered on 
tax planning 
PAGEC4 



Sounding off 

Readers have their say 
PAGEC20 

Among the best 

CLC wrestlers earn 
national honors 
PAGEC22 



ST0CKWATCH 



Company Price 

Abbott 40 1/2 
Allstate 441/4 
Ameritcch 50 1/8 
AT&T 64 
Baxter 45 1/4 



Change Div. 

-21/4 S0.B4 



+11/4 
-1/2 
-1 1/2 
+37/8 



Brunswick 23 3/8 ~m 



Unicom 33 -3/0 

D.WHtcr 54 3/4 +2 
McDonalds 50 1/2 +7/8 
Motorola 56 5/0 +5/8 
Peoples En. 31 -1/2 
Qkr.Oals 313/4 +1 
Sara Lee 33 5/8 +1/0 
Scars 45 7/8 +3 3/4 
UAL 179 3/4 +17/0 

Walgreens 33 5/8 -3/4 
WMX Tech. 29 5/B +11/4 
Cherry Hec.9 3/4 +1/8 
Brwn. Ferris 29 7/0 +1/2 

Baxter shares surged after 
withdrawing an offer to pur- 
chase a division of W.R. Grace 
&Co. r 

Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Scldmterg of Edward D. 
Jones & Co., Graystake. 



$0.78 

$2.00 

$1.32 

$1.73 

$0.50 

$1.60 

$0.64 

$0.27 

$0.40 

$1.80* 

$1.14 

$0.68 

$0.92 

$0.00 

$0.39 

$0.60 

$0.00 

$0.60 



Service keeps bus franchise rolling along 



SUZIE REED ; 

Staff Reporter 

When the Greyhound Bus 
Lines converted the Waukegan 
terminal to an independent 
agency, Rich Jcswani jumped at 
the chance to take it over, but had 
no idea how well his endeavor 
would turn out. 

Since his Molax Enterprise 
corporation took ownership last 
October, the agency has shown 
considerable increases in sales 
over the previous year's figures: 
58 percent more In December, 
and 82 percent— almost double; — 
over the sales in January 1995. 
Figures for February Indicated 
that month too would bring a 
healthy increase. 

"The key here is the service," 
said Jcswani, who is delighted 
with the outcome of his first inde- 
pendent business venture. With a 
background in restaurant and 
hotel management, he knows 
well the value of customer ser- 
vice. 

"1 believe in providing service 
'par excellence.' It's my main 
objective," he said. "When you 
arc in the service business you 
have to provide service and 
understand the difficulties of the 
passengers." 

Changes he has made include 
a priority on finding lost luggage 
and contacting the owners by 
telephone when it is recovered. 
People are pleased to be able to 
rely on that service, he said. 

Jcswani has also made an 
effort to let people know of the 
other services available at 
Greyhound. Tickets can be wired 
to students, military personnel 
and to anyone who gets stranded, 



he said. Although Greyhound 
promises the service within three 
hours via an 800 number, Jeswani 
said he can usually complete the 
transaction within 10 minutes.. 
Boxes and gifts can also be 
shipped via Greyhound, ■ and 
Jcswani will soon be able to offer 
Moncygram wire services. 

The terminal itself is undergo- 
ing changes, said Jcswani. 
Passengers can get a hot cup of 
coffee or a snack from one of the 
vending machines. More pay 
phones. are being added for the 



convenience of customers, 

"I love service-oriented busi- 
ness," he said. "1 love dealing 
with people. I love talking to peo- 
ple. This is just great" 

The current schedule lists 
three northbound and three 
southbound buses each day, 
something Jeswani is trying to 
augment with additional runs. 
Greyhound offers discounts to 
senior citizens and military per- 
sonnel and frequently features 
promotional fares to specific 
cities. They currently have a spe- 



cial rate for travel to Florida, said 
Jeswani. 

"People can take the bus to 
anywhere," he said, "but they 
need to prepare themselves 
before they travel." 

The Waukegan Greyhound 
terminal is located at 2425 Grand 
Ave. between Green Bay Rd. and 
Lewis Ave. Hours have been ' 
extended and the facility is open 
from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, 
through Saturday (closed 
Sundays and major holidays). For 
more information call 224-9200. 




Navy Recruit Balstic, West Virginia, buys a ticket to go home from Rich Jeswani at the Waukegan 
Greyhound Terminal. Balstic graduated from basic training at Naval Training Center, Great Lakes. 
— Photo by Linda Chapman 



Economist predicts Great Lakes states to thrive 

- . _ _ .. . * ... .1. . »: »_ l„... . nn iiM inil nnirnmmnnt.rlonpndnnt 



The Great Lakes states will play out their 
Cinderella story as the former Rust Belt con- 
tinues its economic winning streak during 
the late 1990s, forecasts Diane C. Swonk, 
deputy chief economist of First Chicago NBD 

Corp. 

Meanwhile, New England, the Mideast 
and the Far West will lag the nation in income 
growth, Swonk said in "Regional Winners and 
Losers Revisited," an economic analysis that 
looks at the U.S. economy region by region 
through the year 1999. 

"That's the reverse of the 1980s, when New 
England and the Far West were red hot and 
the Great Lakes states suffered through the 
Rust Belt realities," Swonk said. "The Great 



Lakes Rust Belt has become the nation's 
Growth Belt." 

The Southeast, Rocky Mountain and 
Southwest regions alio will show above-aver- 
age growth in real disposable income, while 
the Plains states will fall below the U.S. aver- 
age annual growdi rate of 2.2 percent, Swonk 

said. 

Manufacturing holds the key to both the 
Midwest's 1980s struggle and its 1990s 
renaissance, as the painful 1900s re- 
structuring reduced relatively high costs and 
improved productivity, Swonk said. 

"The trends shaping the U.S. economy 
today favor the more traditional end of the 
heavy manufacturing sector over growth in 



key service and government-dependent 
industries. The Midwest stands to benefit 
from accelerating exports and from strong 
gains in equipment spending as companies 
invest their record profits." 

As predicted in Swonk's 1990 report 
"Regional Winners and Losers," defense 
spending cutbacks sapped economic 
strength in the Far West, the Mideast and 
New England. 

"In the next four years, cuts in government 
entitlement spending wiU create similar 
problems for the Mideast and New England. 
The Far West, which still hasn't recovered 
from defense cutbacks, faces the continuing 
problem of high costs," said Swonk. 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UI<e1ancJ Newspapers MarcN 1, 1996 

Business BmErs — 



Abbott Labs to increase dividends 

ABBOTT PARK— The board of directors of Abbott 
Laboratories today increased the company's quarterly common 
dividend 14.3 percent to 24 cents per share. The cash dividend 
is payable May 15 to shareholders of record at the close of busi- 
ness on April 15. This marks the 289th consecutive dividend to 
be paid by Abbott since 1924. Abbott Laboratories is a world- 
wide manufacturer of health care products, employing 50,000 
people. In 1995, the company's sales and net earnings were 
$10.0 billion and $1.7 billion, respectively, with earnings per 
share of $2.12. 

Brunswick declares stock dividend 

LAKE FOREST— The Board of Directors of Brunswick Cor- 
poration declared a regular quarterly common stock dividend of 
12.5 cents per share, payable March 15, to shareholders of 
record on Feb. 23. Headquartered in Lake Forest, Brunswick 
Corporation is a multinational company with leadership posi- 
tions in marine power, pleasure boating and recreation. Its 
stock is traded on the New York, London, Tokyo, Chicago and 
Pacific Stock Exchanges. 



-ReaI Estate Personnel 



Debbie Norton 

Wauconda, resident, Debbie 
Norton has joined the Team of 
Century 21 Mid-West United in 
Vernon Hills. Norton has dedi- 
cated 12 years of service with 



RED Center as a fire department 
dispatcher, serving the northwest 
suburbs. She has recently com- 
pleted the Century 21 system's 21 
Plus Training requirements. 




Luxurious Single Family Home 




5 Model Single Family Homes 

and 30 Homcsiles 



Absolute 
Auction 



f&foa ; i 




30766 Gossell 
Wauconda, IL 

Originally priced to S625.000 
Suggested opening bid: S200.000 

5 bedroom, 3-1/2 bath home on 
6-1/2 acres with fireplace, swim- 
ming pool, equestrian facility, 3 car 
garage, lull basement and more, 

Open House: l -3 pm: 

March 9, 17. 20 & 23 



l.'/Commercial/Refall Property- 
KWMi.StaQltf Family Home 




March 30, 1996 








Looking for 

higher rate checking 

and savings? 

You Ve turned to 

the right page. 



l 



315-319 Nlpperslnk Hd. 
Round Lake, IL 

Originally priced to S369.000 
Suggested opening bid: SI 25.000 
8.500 sq. It commercial/retail 
properly with high ceilings on 
approx. 1 acre with ample parking 
and additional single lamily home. 

On-Stte Inspections: 12-2 pm: 
March 7, 13. 16&26 



Rick Levin 
& Associates 

CALL FOR BROCHURE 

(312)587-8800 



tXCtLLtHT FINANCING AVAILABLE 



Lakewood Estates North 

& Oak Meadows Subdivisions 

Carpenlersville, IL 

(At Lake Marian & Deer Creek Rds.) 

Homes orig. priced from 

SI 86,000 to $230,000 

Su'j opening bids Irom: 

$60,000 to S75.000 

Homcsiles orig, priced to $59,000 
Sug. opening bids trom $15,000 
These 2 new prestigious residential 
communities, with approx. 1AW 
acre homcsiles. arc tilled with 
natural beauty, and are rich In 
Quality and abundant in value. The 
wooded, rolling landscapes give you 
a sense of soothing country estate 
living wilh all the convenience ol the 
city. The expertly crafted homes 
leature 1 & 2 stories. In sizes from 
1.357 to 2.350 sq.tt. with up to 4 
bedrooms & 2-1/2 baths. Other 
teatuies include: central air, whirl- 
pool, fireplace, skylights, attached 
2-car garage, wood decks and 
much more. 
Open House: 1-3 pm; ^^ I 

March 10, 16, 17,24 & 27 LSJ ', 





MANAGEMENT 
CHECKING 



.00 



% 

APY 



Cash Management 
Checking. 

Higher interest on higher balances. 

Unlimited check-writing. 

APY based on $25,000 balance. 



I 



Interior JftisHiims 



€\ 




First of America m 

Connections 

Savings 




First of America 
Connections Savings. 

Get high rate savings when you have at. 

least one other First of America account. 

$1,000 minimum opening deposit 



. 'Drapery & Fabric Valance Treatments Excluded From Free Installation Offer. 

Dramatic Draperies & Valances, Vertical cV Mini Blinds, 
Pleated & Duette Shades, Silhouettes, Wood Blinds, 6V 
Shutter, Roller Shades. All Major Name Brands. Custom 
Made. Top Quality. And All Affordable. 

Kirsch • Hunter Douglas • Levelor • Qraber 

Ftae 1996 Kksch Wfadow Idea Book WlUi Bwoy Homs Appofatmoot 

Shop At Home ♦ 740-0992 * No Obligation 



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Factory Direct 



Fully liquid. Risk free. 

Visit any First of America office or call 
1-800 -222-4FOA to open your account by mail. 



O FIRST°F AMERICA Bank 



Annual Percentage] Yields (APYs) accurate as of 2/8/96 and subject to change without notice after account opening. Fees may 

reduce earnings. Vic interest rate fur the portion of the Cash Management Checking balance above $5,000 is tied to the weekly average 

Fed Funds Kate less not more than one percent, which, as of 2/8/96, is 4.61%. Tlie portion of the balance $5,000 and below earns 

an interest rate determined by the bank, which, as of 2/8/96, is 1, 15%. Vie APY ranges from 1, 16% to 4.53% on $100,000. 

Available to individuals at First of America Hank-Illinois only. Member FDIC. 01996, FOA Hank Corporation. 

If hearing impaired, WD line available from 9-5 EST at (800) 289*1614. &. 



j; 'J 






it i > V 



nnUJ.'i: r:i; 



1 1 i.i . i tttLtiul: \ tbhoN .in. i 



r 



\ 






Vicmuy Mi Moni\l 
Hos|)iiaI 



Paperwork 

Fill out pap erwork now to 
tell your doctor or hospital 
what treatment you want 
should you ever have an ill- 
ness or accident which leaves 
you unable to communicate. 
For information on Advance 
Directives, including Durable 
Power of Attorney for Health 
Care and the living Will, call 
Victory Memorial Hospital's 
Pastoral Care Dept at 360- 
4014. 

Healthy Heart 

Victory Memorial 
Hospital's Healthy Heart 
'program offers adults with- 
out heart disease supervised 
access to exercise equip- 
ment on a "pay-as-you-go" 
basis. Equipment Includes 
rowing machines, tread- 
mills, stationary bikes, high 
stepper and more. The pro- 
gram is available at Victory 
Memorial Hospital, 1324 N v 
Sheridan Rd„ Waukcgan. 
Healthy Heart hours arc 
Monday through Friday 
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Call 360- 
4131 for scheduling and, 
cost. 



CoiNcJtll MecJjcaL 
Ckjnter 



Physician Referral 

A Physician Referral 
Service is offered through 
the Doctor's Office 
Connection (DOC) at 
Condell Medical Center. Call 
DOC-2905, oxt 5610. 

Adult asthma 

Adult Asthma 
Management Program at 
Condell Medical Center, 001 
S. Milwaukee Ave., on 
Condell Drive, libcrtyville, 
offers the two-session 
Whcezcrs Anonymous pro- 
gram to help adults learn 
about taking control of their 
asthma and becoming a n 
active p artner with thelr 
doctor in their treatment. 
Call the Dept of Respiratory 
Services at 362-2905, ext 
5175. 



Good Slieplir.Rcl 

Hosp'lTAl 



Art therapy 

On-going Art Therapy 
Group sponsored by Good 
Shepherd Mental Health 
Services. Must be referred by 
a Good Shepherd physician. 
Adults meet on Thursdays, 
from? to 9 p;m. and adoles- 
cents (ages 12 to 18) meet 
on Tuesdays from 7 to 9 
p.m. Cost Is $15. Contact 
Mary Farrell at 381-0123, 
|ext5405. 

Brain group 

Good Shepherd Hospital 
and D owltf Psychological 
Services arc jointly sponsor- 
ing a free support group ;;; 

called "The.Brain Group^fpr 
higher functioning people; 
who have suffered brain 
trauma through accidents, 
trauma, malformations, 
strokes or other degenera- ; 
tlye diseases. The group 
meets the first Wednesday of 
each moth from 7:30 to 9 
p.rn: at the hospital For 
more information call 381- 
0123, oxt. 5093 or Dewitt 
Psychological Services at 
-382t5688:^'^^ 



Ma« ch 1, 1996 UktUrvd Newspapers HEALTHWATCh| 

Barat College presents 4th annual health fair 

I I S\ rT. I *!-. rtit/l ftAMMHH « -*_.. i _ ' C . _■ "__T _l_ * ■ • _ _ _ ■ . *■+* . . t m — .- ______ r 



Health and fitness organizations from 
throughout the area will be present at Barat 
College's Health Fair on March 6. Since 
1992, Kalee Gould, director of health ser- 
vices has designated one day a year as 
Health and Wellness Day on cam- 
pus. Although there will be a focus 
on needs pertaining to students, 
the latest health and fitness infor- 
mation will be provided for facul- 
ty, staff and the public. Experts In 
the areas of sexually transmitted 
diseases, substance abuse, birth 
control, women's health and 
men's health will be present. 

"In order to promote healthy lifestyles, 
we have organized this health fair to provide 
students and the surrounding community 
with information about pressing health con- 
cerns," said Gould. "We try to provide stu- 



dents, faculty and staff with a sample of 
resources they would find In the community 
at large." 

Among some of the organizations that 
will be participating in the fair are HIVCO- 



7n order to promote healthy lifestyles, we 
have organized this health fair to provide 
students and the surrounding community 
with information about pressing health 
concerns/ 

—Kalee Gould 
director of health services 



Resources and information for HIV posi- 
tive—Suburban Coalition, Kusala Center- 
Healing energy therapist, In Touch- 
Substance Abuse prevention organization, 
PMS Holistic Center of Illinois, LIGHT for 



health — Light therapy for people who have 
seasonal effectives disorder and ANAD — 
Promoting awareness of eating disorders. 

For those less motivated by long term 
health and fitness, opportunities for imme- 
= diatc gratification will be available. 
Bagels will be provided as a healthy 
treat by "Once Upon a Bagel" of 
Highland Park, Massage Therapist Janis 
Widran will be on hand to eliminate 
tension from aching muscles, local spa 
"Mandales Beauty Salon" of Highland 
Park will be providing facials, and 50 
lucky individuals will be getting dis- 
count coupons from Loves Yogurt. 
Free to the public, the Health Fair will be 
held in the lower level of the main building 
at Barat College, 700 E. Wcstlcigh Rd., Lake 
Forest, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Contact 
Kalee Gould at 615-5090 with any questions. 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Hospice of Northeastern Illinois thanks contributors 



More than $125,000 has been 
raised by the Hospice 
Foundation of Northeastern 
Illinois' annual fund-raising 
drive, far surpassing the original 
goal of $75,000. The appeal, 
which began In November, has 
gathered contributions from 
more than 500 donors. 

"We have been overwhelmed 
by the response of the community 
to our appeal for funds," said 
Carole Blazck, director of the foun- 
dation. "These contributions will 
help to fund the surrogate caregiv- 
er program, cover expenses for 
non- reimbursable care, produce 
our educational newsletters, and 
fund bereavement programs. Wc 
would like to thank everyone 
involved for contributing their 
resources to such a worthy cause." 



The Hospice of Northeastern 
Illinois (HNI) is a not-for-profit, 
Medicare Certified program that ' 
was originally established in 
1984. HNI served 988 patients 
and families In 1995, located in 
Boone, McHenry, Cook, Lake, 
DuPagc and Kane counties. 

"We care for all patients 
regardless of their ability to pay," 
said Virginia Vravlck, director of 
development at the Hospice. "In 
the past year, the percentage of 
patients without reimbursement 
was 21 percent, which is one-fifth 
of our census. Therefore, com- 
munity support is vital to our 
continued mission." 

The fund-raising campaign, 
chaired by Frederica Smith, foun- 
dation board president, and Sam 
Oliver, Hospice board president, 



actually continues year-round, so 
contributions arc gratefully 
accepted at any time. 



For more information about 
hospice services or contributions 
call 381-5599. 




Bausch & Lomb sponsors 
Olympic poster contest 

Bausch & Lomb, the makers of the Interplak power brushes and 
other health care products, is sponsoring a poster contest with the 
theme, "A Healthy Olympic Smile is Part of a Healthy Olympic Body." 

Contestants 18 years of age and younger can enter the contest by 
requesting entry forms at a participating dental office, or by calling 1- 
800-633-6363 to request a kit The poster design should be completed 
at home and then mailed to the address listed in the kit 

Nine winners will be selected to have their artwork exhibited at the 
1996 Olympic Summer Games in Atlanta; artwork also will be repro- 
duced on a commemorative poster. Winners will be awarded other 
prizes, including Interplak power brushes. 

Dental offices that sponsor winners also will receive prizes to recog- 
nize their participation. 

For each eligible contest entry, Bausch & Lomb will donate $1 to the 
nonprofit "Special Athletes, Special Smiles" oral health initiative, 
which provides dental screening programs for handicapped athletes 
during the Special Olympics. 

One-on-one program helps smokers 

Now there's help for the smoker who has tried to quit, but has found 
group programs and miracle products unsuccessful. Victory Memorial 
Hospital's Community Rehabilitation Department has developed a 
"one-on-onc" program to help smokers "kick the habit" 

Smokers meet individually with a healthcare professional who 
designs a program suited to meet personal needs. The "Individual 
Smoking Cessation Counseling" program allows smokers to attend ses- 
sions between 4 and 6:30 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, as their per- 
sonal schedule allows. A variety of methods and behavior modification 
techniques are available; the program can be tailored to include those 
which prove most effective and successful to the smoker. 

The smoking cessation sessions are held at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 North Sheridan Road, Waukcgan. The fee for the pro- 
gram is dependent on the number of sessions required by individual 
smokers. For more Information, call 360-4131 between 7 am. and 5 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 



Sam Oliver, president of the board of the Hospice Foundation of 
Northeastern Illinois, left, and Frederica Smith, president of the 
foundation board, work on the fund-raising campaign that 
brought in more than $125,000. 

Remember breast cancer at tax time 



In 1993, Illinois became the 
second state to create a Breast 
and Cervical Cancer Research 
Fund featured in the voluntary 
contributions section on Illinois 
State Income Tax forms. Having 
reached the minimum donation 
requirement of $100,000 for two 
consecutive years, the fund will 
be included on 1995 tax forms. 

Money raised by donations 
made on individual income tax 
forms are distributed by the 
Illinois Dept of Public Health 
(IDPH). 

However, language included 
in the bill promoting the fund 
states that the research grants it 
supports must be reviewed by an 
advisory panel and peer review 
committee that includes mem- 
bers of the Y-ME National Breast 
Cancer Organization, the Illinois 
Division of the American Cancer 
Society. 

In Illinois, more than 9,200 
new breast cancer diagnoses 
were expected in 1995, and thou- 
sands of others arc living with the 
disease. If every person with 
breast cancer, and the many peo- 
ple who care about them con- 
tributed just one dollar to the 
fund, we would far surpass the 
$100,000 mark needed each year. 

To date, more than $280,000 



has been given to Illinois-based 
research institutions for studies 
ranging from the inhibition of 
angiogenesis in breast cancer, to 
computer-aided detection of 
lesions missed by mammogra- 
phy. 

This special research fund 
provides excellent encourage- 
ment for Illinois physicians, hos- 
pitals, labs, and educational insti- 
tutions to channel their energies 
towards finding ways to prevent, 
detect, and cure these deadly dis- 
eases. 



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Illinois CPA Society kicks off its support of the earned income credit 



The Illinois CPA Society (ICPAS), in 
conjunction with its public service divi- 
sion — CPAs for the Public Interest, has 
kicked off its support of the IRS Earned 
Income Tax Credit program (EIQ with the 
opening of the first EIC assistance site at the 
beginning of January. The program, first 
introduced in 1994, provides a special tax 
benefit for individuals who are currently 
employed and earning low or moderate 
incomes. The EIC is a vehicle by which 
cities, such as Chicago, can respond to the 
needs of their low-income, working resi- 



dents by reducing their tax burden, supple- 
menting their wages and providing an 
attractive alternative to welfare. 

To qualify for EIC, an individual, single 
or married, must have worked full or part 
time at some point in 1995 and must meet 
the following criteria: 

• Workers who were raising one child 
(under the age of 1 9, or 24 if the child is a 
student) in their home and had a family 
income of less than $23,755 in 1995 can 
receive an EIC of up to $2,038. 

• Workers who were raising more than 






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one child in their home and had a family 
income of less than $25,296 in 1995 can 
get an EIC of up to $2,528. 

• Workers who were not raising children 
in their home, but were between the ages of 
25 and 64 on Dec 31 and had an income 
below $9,000 can get an EIC of up to $206. 

To apply for EIC, workers who were 
raising children in 1995 must file either 
Form 1040 or 1040A and must fill out 
and attach Schedule EIC Workers with 
children cannot get the EIC if they file 
Form 1040EZ or fail to attach Schedule 
EIC. In addition, married workers with 
children must file a joint return to get the 
tax credit. 

Low income workers — ages 25 to 
64 — who were not raising children in 
1995 can file any tax form, including the 
1040EZ. These individuals can simply 
write EIC (or the dollar amount of their 
credit) on the Earned Income Credit line 
on their tax form, which eliminates the 
need to file Schedule EIC. 

Individuals who believe they are eli- 
gible for EIC can receive assistance in 
preparing their tax forms by visiting 
either a Chicago Coalition for Earned 
Income Credit or IRS Volunteer Income 
Tax Assistance (VITA) site in Illinois. To 
receive free, confidential consultation 
on how to file for the EIC from an IRS- 
trained volunteer, low-income, Illinois 
workers should bring their W-2 forms, 
any other proof of income and their tax 
forms to one of the established assis- 
tance sites. 

The ICPAS, along with Arthur 
Andersen and the Center For Law and 
Human Services, has created eight new 



sites in Chicago. They are as follows: 
• Office of Congressman Bobby L. Rush; 
Truman College, 655 E. 79th St., 1 145 W. 
Wilson; Holy Family School; King Family 
Service Ctr.; 1 029 S. May, 431 4 S. Cottage 
Grove; McCormick Boys & Girls Club; 
Area 4 Police Hdqtrs., 4835 N. Sheridan, 
3151 W. Harrison; Harold Washington 
College; and Rudy Lozano Library, 30 E. 
Lake, 1805 S, Loomis. 

EIC assistance sites throughout 
Illinois will be open to the public until 
April 13. For locations and dates and 
times of operation for each of the sites, 
Illinois residents can call the ICPAS at 
(800)813-8788. 

The EIC program is being supported 
and publicized throughout Chicago by 
the Chicago Partnership to Promote the 
Earned Income Credit. The partnership is 
comprised of Honorary Chairman 
Congressman Bobby L. Rush and the fol- 
lowing organizations: American Bar 
Association, Ameritech, Ameritech 
Telephone Pioneers of America, Arthur 
Andersen LLP, Center for Law and 
Human Services, Chicagoland Chamber 
of Commerce, Com Ed, Community 
Currency exchange Association of 
Illinois, Council of Religious Leaders of 
Metropolitan Chicago, Dominick's Finer 
Foods, Ernst and Young LLP, ICPAS/CPAs 
for the Public Interest, Internal Revenue 
Service, Jewel Food Stores/Osco Drug, 
KPMG Peat Marwick LLP, Midwest 
Association of Hispanic Accountants and 
Peoples Gaslight and Coke co. 

For more information on the EIC pro- 
gram, and assistance sites, Illinois residents 
can call the ICPAS at (80O) 81 3-8788. 




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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Jackson Hewitt launches leap year promotion 



Jackson Hewitt Tax Service is 
launching a promotion that they say 
has been in the works for years. 
Actually, make that four years, In 
observance of leap year, the tax prepa- 
ration company is making up for lost 
time by offering any customer whose 
birthday is Feb. 29 a discount on their 
tax preparation fees. Call it a belated 
birthday present. 

"This is a promotion," said Anthony 



P. Nuzzo Jr., director of communica- 
tions at Jackson Hewitt, "that we hope 
to offer every leap year. Just like a leap 
year birthday, if you miss it you will 
have to wait four more years to cele- 
brate." 

As Nuzzo points out, taxpayers will 
not be able to wait that long before 
they celebrate another tax season. The 
tax service, based in Virginia Beach, 
VA, is hoping their promotion will 



File, even if you can't pay 



People who get behind in their taxes 
often continue to put off filing, but the IRS 
says that is the worst move a person could 
make. Although there are penalties and 
interest for paying late, there are much 
larger penalties for failing to file in the first 
place. With each return not filed, the debt 
piles up. By the time IRS comes looking 
for the taxpayer, the amount owed may be 
overwhelming. Also, people who never 
file a return and owe Social Security tax 
won't have a complete work history, so 
they may not be able to collect Social 
Security benefits when they retire. 

Whenever possible, and to avoid addi- 
tional penalty and interest charges, the IRS 
expects people to pay their tax liability in 
full. Those who cannot afford to pay what 
they owe should contact the IRS to discuss 
payment options such as installment pay- 
ments and offers to settle their tax account 
for less than the amount owed. However, 



the offer must be in the best interest of 
both the person and the government 

The bottom line is that it's always better 
to file and, if necessary, make arrange- 
ments to pay rather than waiting for IRS to 
enforce the tax laws. Consequences for 
not filing returns or answering IRS letters 
can range up to an IRS lien against prop- 
erty or, in worst cases, criminal charges: 

When people deal with the IRS, they 
should know their rights as taxpayers. They 
should also find out more about the collec- 
tion process, how it affects them, and where 
to go for help if a problem can't get resolved. 

Details on these topics are covered in 
Publication 1, Your Rights As a Taxpayer 
{Publication ISP, Derechos del 
Contribuyente, in Spanish), and 
Publication 594, Understanding the 
Collection Process (Publication 594SP, 
Comprendfendo el Proceso de Cobro). 
Call 1 -800-829-3676 for free copies. 



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offer some solace. Any taxpayer who 
has had to wait four years to turn 
another year older can get a discount 
commensurate with their age: leap 
year babies in their 20s will get 20% 
off tax preparation fees, in their 30s, 
30% off, etc. Nuzzo said they must 
provide proof that their birthday is 
indeed Feb. 29. 

Jackson Hewitt is the nation's sec- 
ond largest tax preparation company 



with over 1,300 offices nationwide; 
Specializing in computerized tax' 
preparation, free advice and free elec- 
tronic filing with paid preparation are 
available at each location. Nuzzo said, 
if waiting four years for a birthday has 
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Griefhotes 1 

j How can I prevent S 
difficulties from grief? 

Many who confront grief for the first time are 
surprised at the intensity of their feelings. Grief is 
most often associated with the death of a loved 
one but it can also result from divorce, loss of 1 
bodily function, moving or from a child growing 
up and leaving home. Because grief is poorly 
understood, those who have not experienced it 
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Earl M. High, 

Age 81, passed away February 16, 1996 of a heart 
attack In La Mesa, California. He had suffered from con- 
gestive heart failure since 198B. A long-time resident of 
Lake County, Mr. High was born on his family's home- 
stead in Chateau County, Montana on February 11, 
1915, to Arthur Earl and Amy Maude (Miller) High. A 
fewycars later, the family relocated to Waukcgan where 
Mr. High graduated from high school in 1933. He went 
on to earn bachelor's and master's degree in music from 
Northwestern University in Evanston. Later, Mr. High 
along with his wife and two children lived In Duck Lake 
Woods In Inglcslde during the 1950's and In Grayslake 
during the 1960's Ills career endeavors Included work as 
a voice teacher, an accountant, and, finally, a civilian 
auditor for the U.S. Navy from which he retired in 1980. 
He was also a veteran ofWorid War II, serving as a med- 
ical corpsman In the Navy. 

Survivors Include his wife, Nancy (Blair) High of La 
Mesa, California; daughter, Jean High Swanson; 2 grand- 
children, Eric Earl High ofOmaha, Nebraska and Jolic High 
of Berrien Springs, Michigan; his beloved niece, Marta 
Rcnee Magdcn Miller of San Dlmas, California (formerly of 
Waukcgan); sister and brother; several first cousins in the 
Lake County area and several great nieces and nephews. 
He was preceded in death by his parents, his sister, Bcrta 
High Magdcn; son, Dean Blair High. 

Burial was private at Warren Cemetery in Gurnce. 

Elsie JM. Rorrer, 

Age 79, of Round Lake Beach passed away February 
19, 1996 at Condcll Medical Center, Libcrlyviilc. She was 
born November 13, 1916 in Bcdminster, New Jersey to 
Mr. and Mrs. Henderson and was a resident of Round 
Lake Beach since 1976 formerly of Highland Park and 
WcstVirginia. 

Survivors include Dclbcrt Rorrer and John Rorrer 
both of Round Lake Beach; Gloria (J.C) Sunderlln and 
Carol (Harold) Starkey both or West Virginia; Beverly 
Way) Gauding, Ohio, Nick Henderson, New Jersey and 
Pete Smith, Florida; 7 grandchildren; 2 grcal grandchil- 
dren; sisters and brother, Martha Bergen, Adeline Cclia 
and Richard Henderson all of New Jersey. She was pre- 
ceded In death by her parents and her husband, Delbcrt 
Rorrer, Sr., on February 25, 1982 

Visitation was held Wednesday, February 21, 1996 
from 5-9 p.m. at Justen's Round lake Funeral Home, 222 
North Rosedale Court (Cedar Lake Road at Rosedale 
Court). No local services were held. Visitation contin- 
ued on Saturday, February 24, 1996 at the Valley Funeral 
Home, Whltesvillc, West Virginia. Burial was in the 
Williams Family Cemetery, Horse Creek, West Virginia. 
In lieu of flowers, donations to your favorite charity 
would be appreciated. 

Mae Kolb, 

Age B7, of Fox Lake passed away February 21, 1996 at 
Westchester, Illinois. She was a supervisor for the tele- 
phone company and a member of the Lioness Club of Fox 
Lake. 

Survivors include her daughter, Pat (Allan) Schultz of 
Westchester; step -children, Wil (Maris) Kolb, Harold Kolb, 
Ted Kolb Jr., Shirley Probst, and Virginia (Bill) Buikcma; 15 
grandchildren; 26 great grandchildren. She was preceded 
in death by her husband, Ted Kolb. 

Visitation was held from 4-9 p.m. Friday, February 23, 
1996 at Ahlgrim and Sons Funeral Home, 567 S. Spring Rd., 
ElmhursL Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on 
Saturday, February 24, 1996 at Ahlgrim and Sons Funeral 
Home. In lieu of dowers, memorials will be appreciated for 
the LaGrangc Hospice of Fox Lake Lioness. 



George Haag, 

Age 79, of Antioch, passed away Thursday, February 
22, 199G at his home. He was born March 2, 1916 in 
Bonn, Germany. He came to the US in 1961 living In 
Evergreen Park, Illinois, Virginia, and Dccrfield before 
moving to Antioch In 1989. George retired in 1978 from 
the Electromotive Division of General Motors in 
UGrangc, Illinois. In Germany he had been a Stationary 
Engineer in the German Navy and Mercha nl Marine. On 
April 4, 1942 he married Johanna Nichuscn In Germany 
and she preceded him in death on December 30, 1989. 

Survivors Include one son, Gun tor of Antioch; one 
daughter, Rcnate (Dieter) Adc of Dccrfield; grandchil- 
dren, Gregory and Angcllka. 

Funeral services and interment were private. 
Arrangements entrusted to Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch, 

Raymond J. Bchm, 

Age 77, of Grayslake passed away on Tuesday, 
February 27, 1996 at the Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyvllic. Mr. Behm was born in Fremont, Illinois on 
April 4, 1918 and had been a lifelong resident of the area 
residing In Grayslake for over 50 years. He was a mem- 
ber of a pioneer family thai settled In Fremont in 1857. 
He was a member of St Gilbert Catholic Church, 
Grayslake and SL Vincent dc Paul Society and of the 
Lake County Board of Realtor with a office on Center 
Street for 30 years. 

Survivors include his wife, Kathleen (nee Mogg); 2 
daughters, Linda (Steven) Bchm-Mcycr or Denver, 
Colorado and Mary Kay (John) McNeill of Antioch; 1 
son, Willard (Barbara) Bchm of Manzanola, Colorado; 8 
grandchildren; 5 sisters, Helen Hall of Gurnce, Rose 
Schultz of Clearwater, Florida, Mary McRac of 
Clearwater, Florida, twins, Virginia Vasey and Viola 
(Ernest) Plotz both of Grayslake; 1 brother, Ralph Bchm 
of Grayslake. He was preceded in death by Frances 
Paddock, Florence Miller, and James Behm. 

Mass of the Resurrection was celebrated at 10 a.m. 
Friday, March 1, 1996 at St Gilbert Catholic Church, 
Grayslake. Reverend Robert Bcaven, Pastor officiated. 
Interment followed at St. Mary Cemetery, Fremont, 
Illinois. Visitation was held from 6-9 p.m. Thursday at 
the Strang Funeral Chapel, LTD., 410 E. Bclvidcro.na.. 
Grayslake. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be 
made to SL Vincent dc Paul Society In his memory. 



Strang funeral ChapeC, Ltd. 

TstaGGsfied 1898 




"WE CARE" 

410 £. 'Belvidere H(pa(C 
grayslh((e, IL 60030 

847-223-8122 

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MarcIi 1, 1996 UktlANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED- 



I 
I 

13 




NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

VILLAGE OF LAKE ZURICH 

PUDUC HEARING 

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all poraorts that Iho 
VHIago of Lake Zurich Plan Commission shall conducl a public 
hoaring on March 20, 1990, al 7:30 p.m. in Iho Board Room of Iho 
Lako Zurich Village Hall, 70 East Main Slreot, Lako Zurich, Illinois, 
for Iho purposo of considering an amondmonl to Iho Lako Zurich 
Zoning Codo. Chapter 4, Section 102, Subsection E-22 Services. 
This amondmonl would add Iho category General Office to iho B- 
2 Conlral Business District as a pormlttod uso. 

i At tho public hearing, the Plan Commission shall accept tes- 
timony and ovldence pertaining to tho proposed amondmonls and 
other zoning rollol and shall consider any and all possblo zoning 
actions, Including tho granting ol any necessary special permtls, 
variations, other special approvals, or amendments to the text ol 
the Zoning Codo that may be necessary. All into rested persons 
are Invited to attend tho public hearing and be heard. 

BY: Lawronce Coffey 
Chairman -Plan Commission 
Dated: February 27, 1996 
Published: Lako Zurich Enterprise, March 1, 1996 



0396A-646-LZ 
March 1, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER FILE NUMBER: 2S380 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, for tho Northern 
District of Illinois, Eastern Division, GMAC Mortgage Corporation 
of PA, Plaintiff, -vs- Highland Park Horneownors Association, el al. 
Defendants, Case No. 95 C 6857 Involving a mortgage foreclo- 
sure concomtng the following described proporty: 

Parcel 1 : Lot 33 In tho Highland Park Club, Being a Subdivision 
of that Part ol the Southwest 1/4 of tho Southwest 1/4 of Section 
27. Township 43 North. Range 12, East of Ihe Third Principal 
Meridian, According to the Plat Thereof, Recorded December 11 , 
1986, as Document Number 2514242, In Lako County, Illinois. 

Parcel 2: Easement for Ingress and Egress Over Lots 36 and 
37 In tho Highland Park Club, A Subdivision as Alorosald, As 
Provided for In the Declaration Recorded January 29, 1087 as 
Documont 2531334, in Lako County, Illinois, 
c/k/a 973 Coventry Ln„ Highland Park, IL 60035 
Tax ID #16-27-307-041 

OR DER 

THIS MATTER coming to be hoard on tho motion ol the 
Plaintiff for an Order directing Iho Defendants, Highland Park 
Homeowners Association, to appear and f lie their Answer or oth- 
erwise pload to Iho Complaint to Forocbso Mortgage heretofore 
tiled in this matter and ft appearing that an Affidavit ot NorWresl- 
donce Petition for Order of Publication having been filed heroin, 
and the Court being fully advised in the promises; 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that tho Defendants herein, 
Highland Park Homeowners Association die their answers to oth- 
erwise pload to the complaint ot Foreclosure Mortgage herotoforo 
filed by Plaintiff on or beforo March 15, 1996. 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that nolle© of this order be pub- 
lished In the Lakeland Newspapers once a weak tor six (6) con- 

eEtER: "uSSe NORGLE DATED: JANUARY^ TO 1008 

Ellzobolh F. Kaplan - , £ ° 296A_ = 5 C"J / J; 

Ronoo F. Moltzor February 2. 1 996 

Mlchaol S. Fbhor February 9. 1996 

Artono N. Gelrnan February 16, 1996 

FISHER AND FISHER Fobruary 23. 1996 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.C. March 1, 1096 

30 N. LASALLE STREET March 6. 1096 
CHICAGO, IL 60602 
(312) 372-4784 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION 
OF GERALD HUGH BENNETT 
For 
CHANGE OF NAME 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice b horoby given that on March 27, 1996, being 
ono of Iho return days In tho Circuit Court of tho County ot Lako, 
I will filo my Potfllon in said Court praying for tho change of my 
namo from GERALD HUGH BENNETT to that of GERALD HUGH 
RATHEL-BENNETT, pursuant to the Statulo In such caso mado 
and Provided. 

Dated at Grayslako, Illinois, Fob. 9, 1996. 
1st Gorafd Huoh Bonnoll 

0296O589-GL 

Fobruary 16, 1996 

Fobruary 23, 1096 

March 1. 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
VILLAGE OF LAKE ZURICH 
NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 
PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all persons that the 
Village of Lako Zurich Plan Commission shall conduct a public 
hoaring on March 20, 1996 al 7:30 p.m. in Iho Board Room of the 
Village Han, 70 E. Main Street, Lako Zurich, Illinois for Iho pur- 
pose ot considering applications filed with Ihe Village for (1) Map 
Amendment (2) Site Plan approval, and (3) Exterior Appearance 
approval pursuant to tho applicable provisions of the Lake Zurich 
Zoning and Municipal Codes. A copy of those applications and the 
Zoning Codo aro on filo with, and available tor public inspection 
during regular village business hours in, tho Lako Zurich Building 
Department. Tho applications request (1) Map Amondmonl lo 
rozone the property from R-1/2 

-Single Family Residential to IB- Institutional Building, (2) Site Plan 
approval and (3) Exterior Appearance approval and all necessary 
reliof to allow construction ot a Fire Station by Ihe Lake Zurich 
Rural Fire District on property located West ol Midlothian Road on 
tho Southwest sido of Old McHonry Road just oast of the Fairfield 
and Old McHonry Road intersection and legally described as fol- 
lows: 

be East 429.78 feet (measured along Ihe Southllno thereof} of 
that part ot the SW 1/4 ot the SE 1/4 of Section 9. Township 43 
North, flange 10, East of the 3rd Principal Meridian, lying South 
of Ihe centorilne ot State Aid Routo No. 32. as shown on tho Plat 
of Survoy recorded February 13, 1943, In book 29 ol Plats, page 
14, as Document No. 524175 In Lake County, Illinois. 

At said public hearing, tho Plan Commission shall accept all 
testimony and ovkJenco pertaining to said application and shall 
consider any and ail possblo zoning actions, Including the grant- 
ing of any nocossary special permits, variations, olhor special. 
necessary or convenient rollof to permit dovolopmont ot tho pro- 
posed typo at Iho described proporty. AU Intorostod persons aro 
In v Hod lo alt end and be hoard. 



DATE: February 27, 1096 

Lawronce Coffey 
Chairman, Plan Commission 
Published In tho Lako Zurich Enterprise March 1, 1096 

. 0396A-647-LZ 
March 1. 1996 




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On The Internet? 

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for many people. However, if you have any experience with 

it, you know how fast those usage bills can add up. That's 

why Lakeland netDIRECT offers you a local connection - to 

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ii 




CLASSIFIED LaIccUncI Newspapcrs MakcIi 1, 1996 



CLASSIFIED 
GUIDE 

A(NNpUNG6MeNTS 
Notices ...,....,.....,„. .„.„.„.. '. no 

Lost & Found „.,. ,; i \ 5 

Free 120 

Personals , .„.„ ; ,„ 125 

Auctions 150 

Business Personals 135 

Financial , ,.,.. Ho 

ElVJployiVJEMT 

Help Wanted Part-Time 219 

lldp Wanted Full-Tlmc 220 

Employment Agendes ,. , 221 

Business Opportunities „ „.„ 225 

Situations Wanted ...228 

Child Care ....... 240 

School/Instruction 250 

MarIcet Guide 

.-. •.:•-■..••.;■.<■.. •-■..-.■:y.: •:•.;*::■.-; :■.-;.•'• ;•:•;•;;•;•,;•>*■*: * . •;..••."■:•::..: 

Antiques 301 

Appliances 30i 

Barter/Trade 308 

Bazaars/Crafts 310 

Building Materials 3H 

tluslncss/onice Equipment 318 

Bcclfonlcs/Compulers 320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales - 330 

Good Things to EiL 3J*f 

Morses & Tack 33B 

Household Goods/Furrduirc. :..3lO 

Jewelry. » .W 

Lswn/Gardcn 348 

Miscellaneous 350' 

Mtxttcal KqirJjVSupplles 354 

Musical Instruments 358 

Pets ij Supplhs 360 

Kcslaumni Equipment ..... 56<\ 

j (xhs ft jm iicninciy *.* «»>..* ..■■«.(■»(■■■**•» * .. ..*.. jor> 

Wanted To Buy. 370. 

ReaI Estate 



Homes For Sale 



l**t*|lM«tt* ..„,,.,...._.,..:,.. jlfl/ 



Home; For Rent „ 50-i 

Homes Wanted ., ...508 

Homes Builders 510 

Condo/Tnwn Homes 514 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apartments For Rent..- „ 520 

Aparlmcn Is Wanted ..„ 524 

Apl/Homes To Share 528 

Rooms For Rent 530 

Buildings :. 533 

Business Property For Sale..... ....... ....534 

Business Property For Rent ........... „„„.......„..,.......... 538 

Investment Property 540 

Mortgage Services 544 

Farms 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage 560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals 564 

Out of Area Property.. 568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Wanted 574 

Real Estates Mlsc *. 578 



RecreatJonaI 



Recreational Vehicles. — „ ~ 704 

SnowmobtleMTV's 708 

Boats/Molors/Etc 710 

Camping 714 

Travel/Vacation 718 

Sports Equipment .720 

Airplanes 724 

TRANSpORTATiON 

Cars For Sale. - 804 

Rental/Leases 808 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Service & Par Is 814 

Car Loans/Insurance - 818 

824 



Vans 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps . 

Trucks/Trailers 

Heavy Equipment 

Motorcycles ...., 

Wanted To Buy. 



>»•••■• ■••■■«■•■**»•• 



....828 

834 

....838 

844 

848 



SERVICE DiREGTORy 






Appliances Repair........ S03 

Blacktop S06 

Buildcn S09 

Carpentry S12 

Carpet Cleaning.. SI5 

CorjcTCtc/Cemenl SIS 

Dry Wall S21 

Educallon/lnstructloa S24 

fledrical S27 

Firewood i S30 

Handyman S33 

Hcatmg/Alr Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping..... S39 

Landscaping „..,„„.„.....»...... S42 

Laundry/Cleaning S45 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services SSI 

Moving/Storage S54 

. Piintlos/Dccontlng ,* ail 4****M4 •.>*»««•*« »*•"»*»**< ♦>**♦•■■*■*». .*5> 7 

PiraLegal/Typtng Services „ S6o 

Piumbtag.. S63 

Pools.- S66 

Pressure Washing »9 

Professional Services S72 

, Radio/TV Repair....... S75 

Remodeling. S78 

Resumes SSI 

Roofing/Siding S84 

Storage. , S87 

Ta Service...;.... S90 

xTrecs/Pbmts S93 

Wedding.. S96 

Miscellaneous Services S99 



diSTRibuTION 



Twin 
Lakes- 



•Silver Lake 



licnosliii 
County 

• Orlsioi 



nichmond 



•Spring 

Grow 



Jahntburg 



McHwy 



Crysttl 

Like 

ftlcllciiry 

County 



•AnOoch 



m 



•Uht 4Jnd»nhuril 
VKi 



•foiLafcl 



•Kenosha 



HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD| 



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■Zion 



(E) -Widiworth 
•Gum* Wiuktffln 



LsU 



I jlte Coo 1 



^lUndtJl* 



fair 



.P»r* 



Northi 
Ctilcagol 



•North. 



•Uundilfln N.^J>«k* 



Bamngton .Lit* Zurich 



Birring Ion 



© 

-WMtW 

•Long 
Grow 



HUH 



•UncolniMrt 



L»kc Foiesi\ , 
1 \ 
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Highland Park \] 

■ Dceifietd 



•Palatine 



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Oullalo Grove 



Metra 
=MUwaukee 

RR 



• Norlhbrook 



('mill f'iMiiil.v 



lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Antioch News-Reporter • Round Lake News • Lake Zurich Enterprise • 

Lake Villa Record • Mundelcln News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Grayslake Times • Fox Lake Press • Gurnec Press • Lindenhurst News • 

Vernon Hills News • Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 



lEk PHONE ... 




BY 
MAIL 

IN 



Call (847) 223-8161 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



PERSON ... 30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake 

#T*i BY FAX ... (847) 223-8810 

DEADLINES 

Direct Line .....Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - pm ....Mon.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm ..' Friday 



CLASSIFIED 



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Newspapers 



:• •■ :::• :• • v v.* • •-• v yy.y.yyyyy ■'■■■• '■'•'.•'■',•••'•'.•<'<'.■: '.■',•■'.•'. :■•'.■*<:<'•.•.•'■:■• •'■'■:■■' 

iNNOUNGilVlENTS 



125 


Personals 



110 



Nob ccs 



ATTENTION DEFICIT DIS- 
OHDER: No moro Ritalin. Nat- 
ural roliol Is now aval lab to. Call 
1-800-724-3344 lor Iroo Inlor- 
mallon. Maximum Enlorprisos. 

BOOKLET How to Be Sato 
Against Crime or Scams. 
Now booklet reveals system. 
Very Inexpensive. Froe details. 
SASE: Salo Alert, 13731 W. 
Capital Dr., #102L. BrookJIold. 
Wise. 53005. 

HELP PROMOTE WORLD 
PEACE by hosting a High 
School Exchange Student 
Irom Scandinavia, Europe, 
South America, Asia. Don't 
miss this opportunity to broad- 
en your horizons boglnnlng 
August. Call AISE 1-800-SI- 
BLING. 

IS THERE ANY GROUP or 
organization that would like or 
could use the past year's Issue 
of magazines. 'Too nlco to 
toss." Better Homes & Gar- 
den, decorating tips and 
roclpos still current. Woman's 
Day, Family Circle, Country 
Woman, McCalls, Redbook, 
etc. Also: Anyone Interested in 
National Geographies? Call 
(647) 740-1384 lor details. 

SHARE THE AMERICAN 
CULTURE WITH AN EX- 
CHANGE STUDENT FROM 
SCANDINAVIA, EUROPE, 
SOUTH AMERICA, ASIA. 
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 
FROM .OVER 40 COUNTRIES 
ARRIVING AUGUST. CALL 
AISE FOR INFORMATION 
ON HOSTINGI 1-800-SI- 
BLING. 



no 


Notices 



WILL POWER IN A BOT- 
TLE. Loso up to 30lbs., 30 
day money back guarantee. 
While on our program, oxporf- 
once more onorgy, bonoflt tlrst 
day. Feel tull and satisfied. 
Loso wolght and inches. No 
calfolno, 100% natural. Doctor 
recommendod. Call now tor 
tree samples. (847) 

356-8574. 



K^tM^At!^ 




„J0: 

iiiriip 



If? 



Are You Looking 
For A Synagogue? 

CONGREGATION 
AM ECHOD 

1500 Sunset Are., Waukegan 

336-9HO 
SabbuhSflvtctE Fridiy\ 7; JO p-ro.; 

Saturdays, 9 ajn. 

Sunday School 10 a.m.-noon 

Hebrew School In Llndenhunt 

Tuesdays & Thursdays 

4:30 - 6 p.m. 



EL 



Jt 



115 



Lost & Found 



Most 

Cost Effective 

Place To Publish 

legal Advertising 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

•Latest Deadlines 
♦Fastest Service 

For Complete 
Information 
on Rates and 

Coverage 

Contact 
Chris Monies 

(847) 223-8161 



FOUND YOUNG ADULT 
FEMALE CAT, Fox Lake 
Vlsta area, (547) 5fl7-7B59. 

LOST GRAY CAT botweon 
Washington & 120 on 
O'Plalne, has name tag, 'Fred- 
die- . 2/23/pm. (B47) 
360-^567. 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Artldo? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classlllods Dept., and got 
your results, FOUND ads 
are RUN FREE of Charge. 
Call (703)223-8161. 



120 



Free 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN. OUR 

FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 

UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Sodoty. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A FREE 
or GIVEAWAY Ad in the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways aro run at 
NO CHARGE! (We discour- 
age any pet ads). Deadlines: 
10am Wednesdays. (708) 
223-8161, ext.140. 

REMINDER... 

THE NEW AREA CODE FOR OUR 
AREA IS (847) 



■SURROGATE MOTHERS' 
Women nooded to help 
couples ostablish a family. 
Must bo botwoon 18 & 35 and 
oxperloncod childbirth at loast 
onco. Rocelvo a lot) for 'your 
sorvices." and compensation 
lor oxpensos Incurred during 
the procoss. For moro 
Informal I on, contact: 
OPTIONS THROUGH 
SURROGACY, INC. 
Melanlo Hulchons/Diroctor. 
(317) 571-0705 or 
1-800-275-0315. 

A BRIGHT FUTURE Ullod 
With 1ot3 Ol lovo and laughtor, 
happy days spent with famiry 
and friends, and all the bost 
wo can oiler await your child. 
Our hearts aro ready 1o adopt 
a baby to shower with lovo. Lei 
us help. Call Rick and Julia 1- 
800-718-9791. 

ADOPTION: A LOVING AL- 
TERNATIVE. Your doclslon 
for your baby's future shows 
great courage. As an adoptive 
family, we know the lovo and 
happlnoss that awaits your 
child. Wo can provide tho 
stability your child deserves. 
Full-time mom, dovotod dad 
and Syr. old big sister lovingly 
await the chance 1o complete 
our family. Call us 
(Alyso/Bruco) 1-800-824- 
7152 code #11 or our attorney 
SARA at 312-975-0535 or 1- 
800-974-0535. 

ADOPTION: PREGNANT? 
I can helpl I'm an adoption 
consultant who win offer you 
choices, open or closed adop- 
tions, choose and meet the 
couplo, all expenses paid. Call 
tor moro Information. Tammy 

1-B0O-675-3407. 

ADOPTION: WE LOVE 
being paronts. Warm, lively 
family wants another child. 
Largo extended family 
(several adopted). Homo full 
of hugs, songs and laughter. 
Allowable expenses. Let's help 
oach other. Don & Anita (800) 
484-7878 (security code 
7979), 

ADOPTION: WE WILL fill 
your baby's life with love and 
laughter. Expenses paid. Call 
Diane & Jon 1-800-613-2394. 
Thank You. 

DIET 

MAGICIf 

LOSE 

UP TO 

30 LBS. 

30 DAY PROGRAMS 

STARTING AT 

$30.00 
CALL TODAY! 
(708) 223-2517, 



125 


Personals 



219 



lldp Wanted 
Part-Time 



WE'D LOVE TO ADOPT 
AGAINI Physician dad, stay- 
at-home mom, swoel'toddlor 
would welcomo your baby Into 
our family with open, loving 
arms. We're secure and happy 
but wish for a baby to cherish. 
Pleaso can our social worker 
and ask about P & B (847) 870- 
8181. 



Secretary -Part Time 

6 hrsyday, Gurnec. 

Bookeeping & computer 

knowledge a must. 

(847) 223-2399 



135 



Business 
Personals 



HOMEWORKERS 
URGENTLY NEEDED 

Bun weekly p-irU.-.. k. tn m a„ aw „i Kr , 

of your own hone Frta itcujb. s<tj 
laig, tclf addressed, ttanped envelope lo: 

AMERICAN MEDIA ASSOCIATES, 
Dept DD. P.O. Bat 111 
Uke Villi, IL 60046 



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219 



lldp Wanlcd 
Part-Time 



"AVON" REPRESENTA- 
TIVE NEEDEDI NO DOOR- 
TO-DOOR REQUIRED. 
S100-S1 ,200+ Monthly. 

Ind/Salos/Rop, 1-800-236- 
0041. 



DRUMMER 

Classic Rock Band. 

Steady weekend work. 

Michael Lescher 

(847) 395-3000, 

Ext. 133 



INSURANCE 
CLERK 

M, T, Th, F Ipm to 6pm 

Far Lu»y nun-unokin g m«t- 
ical nHlce in Fox Lake. 
Some iniurnnce & liehl 
cum [alter luickgrouiul heljH 
fill, but will train right uer- 
ton. No Iwjirfitu uvaflahle. 

Call 

U47-587-G333 



Part Time 
MECHANIC 

lo work on Saturdays lor 

front end and alignment 

work. Apply within. 

A-TIRE 

COUNTY 

SERVICE 

363 N. Cedar Lake Rd. 
Round Lake, IL 



[ 



2 Positions 
AvaiIadU 






Mcmrtfffi [uuti-iiut 



IZAP THE FAT/l 

• lose up to 30 pounds. 30 day • 

• money-back guaranfee. 100%; 
S Natural. Dr. Recommended. S 

! (847)540-9876 : 

• Ask about Freebles 5 




\^~^*m^mm~£S 



FULL TIME 
• Deli Dept. Manager 

(Must have previous deli experience) 

PART TIME 

• Deli Positions 

APPLY IN PERSON 

Gurnec 

Piggly Wiggly 

S330 W. Grand, Curnce 
847-662-0700 






• '. a -j .'n£Ari.j;*.» 



f% »r»+ w. 



*— ' ' "" oi FH i v^ f tt3&tiiimrjr s i J , Kt , fW i ( ttfK 



«.««., i 



rf i * •• — iii " «-»oj v.i« mm , « ii fc ii mn i^ Mi u *« i jj; 



H JlWVJ ' .i a >^ ' .. as sess 



3 

i, 
I 



219 



Ildp Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Hdp Wanted 
Part-Time 



PART-TIME 
CAREERS 

If you are at least 26 and have 
not reached your 37th birthday you 

could qualify for a career fn the 
NAVAL RESERVE. Benefits include: 

Tension Opportunities 
•Discount Shopping Privileges 
♦Paid Training 
♦Educational Benefits " 
'Free Uniforms 
•One Weekend a Month 
Two Weeks per Year 
♦NO BOOT CAMP 

This is an excellent opportunity for you 
to put your civilian experience to work. 

J*Z for more Information: 
~ Rich Hoffman 




RESERVE 



220 



I (dp Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



•"AVON*" 1-«00-329 
AVON. Earn $200- 
$1200/Month Commission. 
WORK YOUR OWN HOURSII 
(Independent Representative) 
FREE TRAINING & SUP- 
PORTI Call Direct for Dolalled 
Information. 24-Hour Hot Una 
* 1-800-329-AVON. 

AIC IS LOOKING for a tew 
good drivers. 25 yis. old, 1 yr. 
OTR, CDUhazmat, + good 
MVR. Wo otter. Home most 
weekends, late model equip- 
ment, 28r per mUo + Accosso- 

rlal pay. Call 1- BOO- 027-3 GO 

ask for VaJorlo. 

DRIVERS SWIFT TRANS- 
PORTATION now hiring 
owner operators. Exporloncod 
drivers and Inoxporienced 
drivers. Driving school gracta 
are also InvRed to apply. Train- 
ing available, good pay, com- 
plete bonollts. Homo mora of- 
ten. For more Information 1- 
800-284-B785(eoe-m/l: mln. 
23yrs-Vets £1yrs if requlre- 
mants are mot). 

DRIVERS TUITION FREE 
OTR driver training and a 
guaranteed Job. Job security, 
no layoffs. Outstanding pay, 
benefits, CRST. Inc. Call 1- 
BOO-504-2778. 

DRIVERS-CALARK INTER- 
NATIONAL OFFERS 
GREAT PAY, BENEFITS and 
tho chance to GET HOME 
MORE OFTEN! Must be 22 
with CDL and HazMat on- 
dorsoment. BOO-950-6326. 

DRIVERS-EXPEHI- 
ENCED/INEXPERIENCED, 
ATS WANTS youi Enjoy top 
pay/bonollts, high miles, as- 
signed conventlonals saiolito- 
equippod and much more. 
Call ANDERSON TRUCKING 
SERVICE at 1-800-241-8787. 
EOE. 

DRIVERS-SOLO/TEAMS, 
52,000 SIGN on. Top learns 
earn $104,000+. Top tralnors 
earn 70K+. Major bonolfts/mc- 
tet/doadhead pay. Covenant 
Transport 800-441-4394. 
Students call 800-338-6428. 

subscribe 223-8161 



TODAY! 



COLLECTORS 
Immediate Openings 

Gurnee-based Eagle 

Finance is seeking 

collectors for our fast 

paced automobile 

finance corp. Some 

experience helpful, will 

train the right person. 

Call Anytime to 
complete a n automated 



telephone application; 
(847) 549-5831 Ext. 537 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

pteaso chock your ad on the FIRST Insertion date. In Iho 
event ol an error or omission, we will bo responsble for ONLY 
the FIRST Incorrect Insertion. The newspaper will be respon- 
sible lor only the portion of tho ad that Is In error. Pteaso noti- 
fy tho Classlllod Department In tho event of an error within 1 
week ol run date. CANCELLATIONS must be made prior to 5 
p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves tho right to property 
classify all advertising, edit or delete any objectionable word- 
ing, or rejed any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 
All Help Wanted advertising l9 published under unllled 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
hefc wanted advertising that In any way violates Ihe Human 
Rights Act. 

Payment In Advance Is Required (or These Ads: 

•Advertisers out ol the Lakeland circulation area • Business 

Opportunities -Mobile Homes • Situations Wanted •Debt 

Disclaimers •Garage and Moving Sales -Found and 

Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

No pots will bo considered tor giveaway. 

We Accept Visa MasUrcard, Discover 



MarcI. 1, 1996 LAkflANd NtwspApcfK CLASSIFIED 




HOMEWORKERS WANT- 
ED! MAKE $180 Weekly Clip- 
ping Coupons In Your Homo! 
Checks Are Malted Weekly I 
Application, Send Long Seii- 
Addressed Stamped Envel- 
ope: National Coupon Net- 
work, 668 Main St., Suite 235, 
Ext. #473, Wilmington, Ma. 
01887. 

IF YOU HAVE 5-50LBS. 
TO LOSE, we have the ca- 
reer (or youl Can RH at 800- 
445-9726. . 

IICPNSED I IFF ft HFA1.TH 
Aopnt NFFnpn Quality 
products, high commissions 
with advance before Issue, 
load syslom, and benefits. 
(Must qualify lor advances A 
bonoftts). Call 1-800-252- 
2631. 

NEEDED: PIPEFIT- 
TERS/WELDERS, MILL- 
WRIGHTS, Insulators, Elec- 
tricians. Health Insurance, Va- 
cate n/401 K/Holkfays. 
EOE/Drug screen. Contact: 
Slovo Laverty (800) 844-8436 
or Fax Resume to: (316) 378- 
3900, A-LERT CORPORA- 
TiON. 

TRUCKERS-OWNER OP- 
ERATORS NEEDED, Dallas 
& Movie Boat Hauling Division. 
Must have CDL and OTR ex- 
perience to be part of this ex- 
citing environment. Call 1-800- 
648-2424. 

WAREHOUSE/LOGIS- 
TICS. ENTHY LEVEL ap- 
prenticeships available, H.S. 
grads to ago 34 willing to re- 
locate at our oxponse. U.S. citi- 
zenship required. Call: 1-800- 
469-6288. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



TlrCSON,AZ-AUTOTECIIS 

Immtdttl opttringa. Surry AZ1 Fwd 
D**)« ratio. 5 ym. dealertrip experi- 
ence. ASE Cctlltd preferred. 
Excelenl benefiti inducing prof I 
rfure, 40 IK, McjtI opportjniBej. 

Resume; Jim Click Ford, Attn.: 

0. Jorte* .P.O.Box 12300, 
Tucton, AZ 65732. 
Far 520-570-7302 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fun-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



CHAUFFEUR 

Full/Part Time. Win Triln. 

M tut be 25 jxiri old end 

have a good driving record. 

Call (847) 549-0020 



Truck Drivers 

Full time. Must have 

Ctass A - CDL for 

delivery of nursery 

stock. Lake Zurich. 

(847) 528-1498 



ALOHA 

Seeks Island lifestyle. Run 
Away Rich & Famous alti- 
tudes. Reps & Trainers. No 
exp. nee. Top SS$. 

(847)714-1914 



FAIRFIELD 

INN 

GURNEE 

Mow hiring for 

Full and Part Time 
Front Desk 

Experience Preferred 

6090 Gurnee Mills Blvd. East 
Guroo.IL 60031 

(847) 855-8868 

Management Opportunities 
Abo Available! 



Assistant to 
Service Manager 

Liberty Coach, i luxury coach 
manufacturer, has entry-level 
position In our fist-paced ser- 
vice dept. for detail minded, 
organized person to assist ser- 
vice manager, answer phone 
calls, and process warranty 
claims. Some knowledge of 
diesel engines helpful. Will 
train qualified candidate. 

Apply in person 

1400 Morrow Ave. 

North Chicago, IL 60064 

(847) 578-4600 or fax 
resume to: (847) 578-1053 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Teachers & Assistants 

If you want to make 
difference In a child 
life, call Nancy: 

(847) 634-1982 



SALES 
COORDINATOR 

For in-House Ad Agency 
Position requires Knowledge 
of prepress and printing, 
plus some sales and/or 
graphics experience. 
Excellent writing and orga- 
nization skills a must. 
Mac competency a plus. 

Forward Miaows to! 
WoodiQ PnblUhiag, Dept. 
19 XIX 13 975 W. Po Jo lr*H Drin 

Box 5000 

Life Fonat, DL 60045-5000 

Hms 847-362-8776 



OUTSIDE SALES REP. 

Full Line Foodservice 

Distributor seeking 

aggressive self starter in 

the far north suburbs. 

Existing route with huge 

potential, must have 

experience in food 

service. Send resume in 

confidence to: Attn: 

Sales Dept., 950 Arthur 

Ave., Elk Grove Village, 

IL 60007 



PUNCH PRESS OPERATORS 

Growing Lake County manufacturing co. has immediate 

openings for light punch press operators on Its day ahilt. 

No previous experience Is needed. Excel lent starting 

wages and benefits are available for qualified parties. We 

encourage you to come In and complete an application or 

oerid a letter of interest to: 

AIR-DRIVE, INC. 

Porionnal Director 
4070 Ryan Read, Ounito, IL 60031 



re /vi i r->i o e Ft . . . 
THE NEW AREA CODE FOR OUR 
_■ AREA IS (847) 



DISPATCHER 

The Antioch Police Department is accepting applications for the 
position of Dispatcher. Applications can be picked up, Monday 
through Friday, 8:30AM lo 4:30PM at 882 Main St., Antioch, IL 
60002. Applications will be available March 1, 1996 through 
March 15, 1996 and must be returned by March 22, 1996. 

Applicants must be at least 21 years of age, have, a high school 
diploma or GED, must be available to work various shifts, must 
be dependable, type at least 30 words per minute, must have 
computer experience, and must pass an extensive background 
check. 

Starting salary is SI 9,700.00 Employment includes benefits 
and a retirement plan. 





JOB FAIR 



i 
v 



Tuesday, 3/5 & Wed. 3/6; 9.00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
4949 Grand Avenue, Gurnee 



! 
* 

Ji 




Lobster. 

LAKEHURST 

NOW HIRING SERVERS 

AND KITCHEN HELP ' 

BUSINESS IS BOOMING!!! 



NOW HIRING 



FULL & 
PART TIME 



Paying up to $5.50 per hour 

Looking for Full Time/Part Time 

ALL SHIFTS - 

Apply In Person or Call 
338 Rte. 173 - Antioch 

(847) 395-8806 



YMCA 

Childcare & Learning Center 

Is now hiring for... 

Full Time 

Early Childhood Teacher or Teacher Assistant 

...tn our 4 yr. old classroom. 
QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHER: 
Associate degree w/6 hours In early childhood or CDA or 
minimum of 1 yr. experience In early childhood w/30 credit 
hours Including 6 hours In child development. 
BENEFITS: . 

• Pjfd sick, holiday, vacation 
'Full medical and dental 

• Retirement Plan 
•YMCA membership 

Salary commensurate with experience and education. 
Apply in Person 

YMCA CHILDCARE & LEARNING CENTER 

706 E. Hawley, Mundeleln, IL 
For Information, Call 

(847) 949-0060 

Ask for Director 



Data Entry 

Operator 
Vernon Hills 

EXCELLENT FuBTune 
Oppcrtuni ty for an erttrusjastic, 
reliable individual to join our 
dib entry staff. 

PRIMARY RESPONSlBILnYU 

to enter and update customer 
I information. 

APPUariTmustruyea 

minimum of 1 year Alpha and 
I Numeric data entry experience 
and be able to read hand written 

source information. 

WE'RE A NATIONALLY known 
I direct mail cosmetic company 

I with a tobacco-free wore- 
I place. 

ICALL YVONNE at 
W7/913-9099ext.401 

I for more information. 

COSrVfFnOUE,200 
Corporate Woods Parkway, 
Vernon Hills, IL6O061 



Factory Warehouse 

INSPECTORS/PACKERS 

EARN WHILE YOU LEARN1 

12-HOUR 

AM & PM SHIFTS: 

7:45 p.m. • 8 a.m. 

(S7.45/HOUR) 

7:45 a.m. - 8 p.m. 

(S7.2Q/HOUR) 

H you're looking for a great Job 

opportunity, then call ACCUSTAFF 

today! We're currerrtty accepting 

applications lor one of GURNEFs 

largest cc<npaniei_NYPBO 
CHICAGO, INC! Candidate must 

novo a high school diploma or 

eqiivaktnt and be able to pass drug 

screening . Those are loog-tarm 

jobs lasting for an Indefinite time. 

prc<roer4ovr 

• A WEEKLY PAYCHECK 

• Employer Contributed 
Benefits including 
MEDICAIAJF&OENTAL 
4 40T(K) 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, 

CONTACT: 

LARRY 

(847) 244-0889 

ACCUSTAFF INCORPORATED 

"The Employment Edge" 

For NYPRO CHICAGO INC. 

EOE 



tea 



SERVERS MAKE 

BETWEEN $3QO-$500 

A WEEK (Full Tune) 

Pan* time hours 
also available , 



Please apply in person 
900 Lakehurst fed. Waukegan 

We are an equal opportunity employer 




X»l£J J _*, Ira r -i ' — .1 -<**' 7^ 



IPs Coming on March 15m. 

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 

Lake County's largest and #1 source to Jobs and careers. Find out 
who's hiring, see what Jobs are available. Til J 

. Read about the area's Job situation all In a JLaKCl£tHCL 
speclal pull-out section. Look for It March 15th. Newspapers 



GRAY 



MACHINERY COMPANY 

DfyUtoo or tt/ij- tndusfcUJ Lmwtfflwiu, Inc. 

Growing, aggressive industrial company looking for dedicated, self-starting, on-the- 
go individuals for several pivotal positions in our warehouse department. 

*Rigger/Over-head Crane Operator 

Experienced - Full Time 

^Machinery Cleaner 
No experience required will train 
Ftdl Time 

*Machinery Mechanic/Electrician 
Experienced - Full Time 

*CNC Machinery Technician 
Experienced - Full Time 

Individuals must be hard working and able to work with little supervision. Salary 
for all positions is commensurate with experience. Benefits, vacations, good work- 
ing environment. All candidates should contact Mark Speck at 708/537-7700 to 
schedule an immediate interview. 



APPLICATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED 

FOR RESIDENTS OF LAKE & SURROUNDING COUNTIES. 
REGISTER NOW IN A STATE NATIONAL TRAINING SERVICE 
PROGRAM TO TRAIN FOR FEDERAL & STATE EMPLOYMENT 

ELIGIBILITY IN GENERAL CLERK & LAW ENFORCEMENT. 
(MENAV0MEN-1B&0VER) 



• Communications 

• Medical Assl 

• Hearth Aide 

• General Clerk 

• Postal Service 

• Food Service 

• Construction 



•Inspectors 

• Computer Operator 

• Social Service Ass t 

• Motor Vehicle Operator 

• FBh&WaofleAdm. 

• FnFghtedPoIica Officer 
•Border Patrol 



• Law Enforcement 

• Fingerprint Identification 

• Security/Prison Guard 
•Deputy U.S. Marshall 

• Immigration Inspector 

• Correctional Officer 

• iMore 



With Starting Pay Of Up To: a 20 M /hr. 
GREAT BENEFITS - JOB SECURITY 



• No Experience Required 

• Government Provides 
Job Training 



• High School Diploma Not Required. 

• K you have experience or higher 
education, you may be eligible for 
higher pay ratings. 

STATE NATIONAL TRAINING SERVICE 
2 HOUR ORIENTATION - *5 FEB 

HOLIDAY INN - GURNEE 

6161 WEST GRAND AVE, TUESDAY, MARCH 5th ONLY! 

11:00 A.M. OR 3:00 P.M. 

(Vets king DO -214 or Military ID) 

Um/rod Seating No Phone Mb Bring Pen NoChtdnn 



■ 







CLASSIFIED LaIceIancI Newspapers MarcIi 1, 1996 



■ ' '■' r '/.•'.'. :!-'!!! '•'■' ' yA / '.y.-'.y- f .i'''. '•''-'.' * ''.'tw'-ys.'- 



TWWWWWWWi //.w.v/yvAvwJ 



y^.v.;.'//Ay.y.-.*.y^.y .•.>•,• ... ..... • - - ... • ..... y.y.-.y '.-'. ■/■'• •! 

mdIovivient 



:•:■'.'.' ■■■■'*:-'•>: 



■-• 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



•f,-. .•.■f.-'ff.-tti.:-.-. 



220 



Help Wasted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



Am **■ 



I** 



LOT MAN' 

Highland PiA Lincoln Mocwy ii look- 

ing fur in « pcr.cnccJ Lot Mm la Join 

our lam of profcssi'onili. Good Piy. 

Dene Hi*. Ait for Titrick Srnythe. 

HIGHLAND PARK 

LINCOLN MERCURY 

847-8315880 



HEALTH NUT 

Socking athletic women and 
men for advancement in the 
nation's fastest growing compa- 
ny. Must like working with peo- 
ple and health-conscious. Call 

(847)714-1914 



PERSONAL 
ASSISTANT 

Social and business communi- 
cation. Computer knowledge' 
able, capable of independent 
work organization in a very busy 
household. Telephone & written 
communication skills vital, coor- 
dination with household admin- 
istrator & staff. Challenging 
position for person looking for 
"right" job. Approximator/ 6 
hours a day. Salary negotiable, 
Send resume to: 
Joan McLoughlin 
1000A!lanson Rd. 
Mu ridel em, 1L 60060 



'ijiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiLh 

FACTORY 

HOpenlng In aluminum | 
^casting co. for pour &= 
slight machine shop| 
|work for ma1ure= 
iresponslble lndlvld-1 
lual. Some machine! 
|shop background! 
Ihelpful. Will train. 

| Ke Hermann 

iManufaeturing! 

1 (847)526-7266 ! 

^iiiiitiiiitmiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiir?. 



ELECnUCIANS 
NIGHT SHIFT 

Nichols Aluminum Is currently 
seeking experienced Electricians 
(or our Plant In Lincolnshire. 
Knowledge and proficiency with 
PLC's, AC/DC drive and Lo/HI 
voltage control systems pre- 
ferred. Knowledge ol electronics 
helpfuL 

Top pay ot $16.50, Safety and 
Productivity Incentives. QuaWled 
candidates may send resume to: 
Nichols Aluminum, MO Scheltar 
Road, Ltneotnthlrt, IL SOOoO 
EEO 




DATA. ENTKV POSITIONS 

Asa result of growth, National Business Systems, Inc. has immediate j 
needs for full and part-time data entry operators for flexible hours 
during the 1st and 2nd shifts. We ofTer a competitive salary and an 
attractive benefits package including medical and life insurance, 
401(k) plan, and paid vacation to our full-time employees. If you can J 
key 1 6,000 ks or type 45 wpm, and possess alphanumeric data entry 
skills, please call (847) 680-5 1 59. 

National Business Systems, Inc. 

342 N. 4th Street 
Libertyvi!le f IL 60148 



r~ "SECRETARIES!! J 

I Top Corporations. Various Positions Available; Temp & Perm. \ 
244-0016 

S «___Z^uperlor Jbcrsonncl » 



The NEffi Holiday Inn Mundelcln, now managed 

by Metro Holds, Inc. is looking for qualified 

Individuals for the following positions: 

PERFECT AFTER SQIOOUWEEKENDJOBS 

FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AVAILABLE 

- COCKTAIL SERVER (Must be 18) - BARTENDER PT 

- FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR - A.M. &WQUET SERVERS 

- 2 HOSTESSES PDDays - WATTSTAFF FT Nlghls/Evenlngs 

-BELLMAN/DRTVERFT - FRONT DESK MANAGER 

If you arc a hospitality professional and arc as excited 

about the future of the Holiday Inn Mundelcln as we are, 

please apply in person dally between 9-5. 

The Holiday Inn Mundelcln 

510 But Route 83 or Fax Resume (847) 949-01 17 




MANAl.KMIiVT 

ASSISTANT MANAGER 

TRAINEES 

$30,000 TO START 

$51,500 to $54300 

UPON PROMOTION 

Your desire (or total management 
rc^poniibility coupled with an 
eaRcmeis lor challenge could 

nuiUly you (or ihil tin.-u.ic>, 
ENTRY LEVEL training program 
wilh an industry leader. This 11 a S 
day, 40 hour work week. Your pjst 
experience will allow you- lo 
progress lo an upper management 
position within 12 months with 
income in the lower SSO's. On- 
the-job training will cover all 
aspects of the business to Include 
customer service, purchasing, per- 
sonnel, supervision and (raining. 
Excellent company paid benefits 
include major medical, life insur- 
ance and dental. 

For immediate consideration, call 
or send resume. 

(314) 727-0041 

KENDALL & ASSOC, INC. 

150 N. Mcramec, Stc. 310 

CLAYTON, MO G3105 

EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
i.or. 



Skilled Trades 

FOREMAN WANTED 

Leave crime & high cost of living! 

Seed eip'd hand in mill & elevator 

repair, grain bins & steel fabrication. 

Well equipped trucks, great 

hunting/fishing. Enjoy smalltown liv- 
ing working for 'reasonable employer. 

i Call Ken caOO-il 0-03*7 NOW. 



84 LUMBER 

Manager Trainees 
Contractor Sales Reps 

Career opportunities available with 84 Lumber, the *1 

growth oriented retail lumber chain. 

Manager trainee positions allow you to cam while you learn. 

84 provides an excellent training program that includes sales 

and hands-on physical work. 

CSR positions require complete knowledge of lumber and 

building materials. Good people skills required in dealing 

with contractors, 120% inside/80% outside sales). 

Offering a competitive starting salary, full benefits and a 

strong 'promote from within" policy. Passible relocation. 

Discover what makes us II. 

See: Dave Cochran 

Wed., March 6th, 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. 
Thurs., March 7th, 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Apply at: 84 Lumber Company 

2234 N. Rand Rd. 
Palatine, IL 
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F DV 



Its Spring Hiring Time!!! 

COMING MARCH 15TH 

EMPIOYM 



Administrative 
Administrative Service 
Gonoraliat 

come grow wrraus.. 

Cok-I'iirriu'r instrument. Campuny, 

(I worldwide distributor of *f imtific 
instrumcuU, han an immediate 
opening in aur Administrative 
Service* Department. 

Aji an Administrative Service 
Gcncrnliat, you will prepare work 
onions on Uic I*C/ process mail, 
send and distribute fine* and pro- 
vide copy service*. Rain entry 
accuracy essential, mw»t bo ublo to 
lift 50-70 11*. 

All opportunJUca require a mini 
mum of 1 yrurciperiunrt; in a Kim 
iiar position along with a good 
understanding ofu business envi 
ronmcnl. Competitive nturtinR 
salary and comprehensive benefit* 
purkii^c. Please send resume to: 

Cole-Parmer Instrument 

Human Resources 

625 E. Bunker Court 

Vernon Hilla, IL 60061 

An Kquil Opportunity Kmplciytr WP 





GREAT OPPORTUNITIES 



Our client, a major Fortune 500 
Company located in control 
Lake County Is currently seek- 
ing clerical people for long-term 
temporary assignments. 

Clerk-upto$8.76fHr. 
Receptionist -up to $9.00/11 r. 
Data Entry- up W$9.25/Hr. 
Accounting Clerk - up to $3.7501 r. 
Cuilomer Service - up to $lG7Hr. 
• Administrative Assistant 
-up tot 14/11 r. 

Very low cost Medical & 
Life Insurance Provided 

Afler 4 month* 

WEE DEPENDANT OOVHUCEB 

Call for immediate appointment. 
AnkrorDobble 

(847) 816-8422 

EXPRESS PERSONNEL SERVICES 



Lake County's Largest and # J 
Employment Guide 

•Looking to fill positions at your company??? 
•Do you need quality people fast??? 

•Is your company growing??? 
•Time for you to hire summer help??? 

Then turn to EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK, 

a special pull-out section with your 

employment needs in mind, 
EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK is a guide to 
jobs and careers along with editorial 

on Lake County's job situation. 

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK appears in all 

13 Lake Newspapers, reaching over 

200,000 readers. Plus, prices are 

discounted up to 50%. To take 

advantage of THE #1 employment 

guide, call Greg or Karen today at 

(847) 223-8161 or 
Fax (847) 223-8810 

Hurry - Deadline Is March 9th at 5 p.m. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Ftill-Tlme 




220 



Help Wonted 
Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



"AUTO SALES** 

Highland Park Lincoln Mercury is 

looking for eiperienccd sales 

personnel to sell New and Used 

Cars. Good Salary. Demo Plan, 

Up to 30% Commission! 

Come work for Chicago » # I 

Lincoln Mercury Dealer. 

Ask for Patrick Smythe, 

HIGHLAND PARK 

LINCOLN MERCURY 

847-831-5880 

EMPLOYMENT 
NOTICE 

Gavin School District 
#37 in Ingleside, IL is 
seeking school bus dri 
vers. Starting pay is 
$11.00+ per hour. 
Please contact Mrs. 
Dunkin at 847-546- 
9336 or 847-56,6-4459. 



CUSTOMER SERVICE/SALES REP. 

$7.00 to $20.00 hr. Pnrt Time/Pull Time. Will train unexperienced 
person w/gootl work: hnbltt & great nltltutle. Great profit! for eipe- 
rienccd closers as well. Good cash bonuses paid to everyone dally, 
Great working environment for those who can be convincing. Sick 
nnd tired of working for a slurry boss, in n stuffy environment? 
Fuel's dcnll Salary, draw, straight commission. 

Help us represent * 99 year old company. 
Work 1cm hard and more smart. 

CALLs Robert or Chris 
847-740-9678 847-740-9864 



^ADVERTISING SALE? 



DRIVERS 



9,Mti? 




* 

* 

WfifflTED J 

$S Earn that Extra Cash $$ y 

Residential delivery. § 

Small car and ty 

insurance necessary, y 

Mundelein \$ 

(8*7)9*9-9240 

Ask for Jerry " 



Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly newspa- 
per Rroup, is seeking an Advertising Account Executive, the 
candidate will be responsible for field sales calls, developing 
a key area in Lake County and must possess excellent skills In 
interpersonal communication, creativity and personal respon- 
sibility. The candidate must also be sell motivated and able to 
work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy variety and 
be able to handle multiple tasks. An automobile is necessary 
(gas compensation will be made). If you are professional, 
energetic and possess all of the above characteristics we are 
interested in talking lo you. A candidate should have previous 
sales experience. Please send resume or call: 

Esther Hebbard 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney SI. 
Grayslnke, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8161 



L 



EOE 



A 



MEdiCAL OppoRtuiNitiis 



■wni > ii i .ii i ^*m 1 iyii i i » n i i m K «ni >**< ii« s «iii i ->m m, 

ORTHODONTIC 
ASSISTANTS 

Busy, Fun Orthodontic 
Group needs part-time 
enthusiastic assistants look- 
ing for a rewarding career 
with great potential for per- 
sonal & professional growth 



L 



(847)223-2876 



WEEKEND HELP 

CNAs / HAB Tech 

DD Experienced preferred, 

but will train. Ask about 

our new wage structure 

(only mature, conscientious 

people need apply). 

For more information call 

(847) 855-9450 

Located west of Gurnee IL. 

A program of Lutheran 

School Services of Illinois 

EOE 



iot/ed" 

ajMCALNuTLfflSPEOALOT 

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 

L«W Zml. W. ol St ChssssrGwwvi 
>■•*, KltfiMUli** Communry HospiU 
SMfcs dynamic, sdvinud pr«c«ce 
Cirtcisfl b Issn our ICU & Em«Qeney 
DapL In dnlcsJ npwlM, ttsS devdap- 
msnl, qutlty assurance & laaaarch 
Maslai'a Dt^nw o/apprcprlsta dmleat 
'mji ■• i«i'<J Prater 3 yr* ICU/CCU np 
Wa offst comp ufArifts. 
Piano contact or aencVlu re sum a 

]«<H^e^A£DttAid,Kil}jWliArt 

C aaiM pi i T Hospital, 
fK tetoj li, DOifc, 0. £0111 

Ph:8K-7Ic-U21txLlH9 



Medcal 

ADMINISTRATOR 
OF NURSES 

C<mprBh8njrvi Horw Heifth Agency task, 
ino Reg'd Nuw (pnjt. ejchetors teqrtt) 

wrexc soiTurwtriSw, ornjnizibonal & lead- 
ershasioh. Csno^ttsmusthivtirrtfi- 
mum ol 3 jm of progressivtJy responsibl* 
supvrisory or idminatnlJyB exp. in Iwrns 
hBslth cars, hulft servicei or nlitsd feU 
Pruviouj Up, D DON or AON ki s JCAM0 
aecrsdled rar>i htstih agerxy strcogry 
pnel't). Exc base ssL/bens. Signircant 
bonus potenii) based on pwformarc« 4 
ability lo rnMt dspL A sgsney goab. SsndJ 
or FAX MUM b: Kenny OsAifjAav-. Admin, 
hfusbn PM, P.O. to *46Z MUM. TX, 
79T04; FAX (915) 637-0530 or caJ (915| 
570-758T tor mors Wo. or a copy ot it* job' 
description. Irruson PU 's an eojal oppor' 
Unity employer- 



REMINDER... 

TI!tNE\VAR£ACODF.rOROUR 

AREA IS (847) 



a em man raramra k 

| Direct i 
s Care 

5 Direct Care Workers for 3 
gMFI/DD women In resl-Q 
^dentlal setting. Full or Part™ 
time is available. Primarily 
afternoons, evenings, and 

B weekends. We are com- 
mitted to quality residential 
care, if Interested please 9 
call Gall Becker. 



QMRP 

to perform case 

management 

services to case 

load of MR/DD 

Women in 

residential selling. 

Bachelor's Degree 

and one year 

experience with 

MR/DD population 

required. 

Contact 
Cail Becker 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(847) 438-5050 
Lake Zurich 



MANAGER FOR 
SURGERY SERVICES 

Providence Goner or MecScd Centef 
is se«Ung a dynamic individual who 
pcmoii ■ b nek ground in OR mgml 
to manage tie 22 operaiing room 
ot the combined campuses ot 
PQMC. Wlhtin Sua Main OR, car- 
disc, ENT, eye, general, gynecology, 
Irthotripsy, neurosurgery, orihope- 
rici, plartc, thoradc, urology Avas- 
cular surgeries are performed 
Transplants are not done at PGMC 
Reqm'ts incfd but are not iimrbsd to 
min. 3 yrs. OR'mgm't exp. I B.S.N 
reefd. Consdidrdion cap. desired. 
PGMC is a part ol the Sisters' ol 
Prwridenco Health Care System is 
loe'd |ust X mm. north d Sealle. 
PGMC otters comp. bens/sal 
PGMC is a non-smddng environe- 
rncnt. Re3se send cover letter & 
resume to: PROVIDENCE GENER- 
AL MEDICAL CENTER, COLBY 
CAMPUS, P.O. Bos 1147, Evefctt, 
WAfJB?0C. l-flOT>fl32-5a7. E.QE. 



1 

(847)438-5050 

Mount 
j Si. Joseph [ 

Lake Zurich 

iho wnaunaoa mi r 

MHHMMHHMMHHN 

m Developmental m 



LPN 

Immediate openings for full time/day & night. 
If interested contact Linda Kinney 

18471 438-5050 

Joseph 



ia 



EL 



M 
M 
M 
N 

H 
M 
H 
M 
M 
M 
M 



Trainer 

Full time, entry-level, 
willing to train 
individuals with 
developmental 

disabilities, in skills, 
oral hygiene, domestic, 



H 
H 
N 
N 
H 
H 
N 
H 
H 
M 
H 



M pre-work and community. M 

M Contact M 

H Gail Becker ^ 

m (847) 438-5050 m 

MOUNT - : 

m ST. JOSEPH h 

^ Lake Zurich ^ 
HHHHMHHHHHMH 



Modksal 
"LIVE IN SUNSHINE ALL YEAR ROUND" 

Hendry General Hospital la a 55 bed facility located In South Central 
Florida In a small rural town called Clewtston on Lake Okeechobee, 60 
ml. East ol Ft. Myera, 60 ml. west of West Palm Beach. 

Currently seeking the following qualified RNfc for. 

• CCU & EB - 7P-7A. Full-time & Per-Kem frACLS Required) 

• Med/Surg. - Full-time and/or Per-Diem all shifts (Experienced RN's and LPN's) 

• Director of Quality Management Seeking Licensed RN with a min. of 
3 years quality management experience required lo manage and facilitate 
hospilal-wtde CQI program. Knowledge ol Medicare guidelines, NCGA 
standards, UR and Regulatory and Accreditation processes a MUST, 

• Director of Food Services Department Registered Dietician experi- 
enced In providing clinical services In an acute care setting with experi- 
ence In managing a food services operation. 

Wa offer a competitive compensation/benefits program. 

ER/TCU RNs Bonus $1 ,600 for F/T employment commitment. Education 
differentia! and specialty certification a bonus. 



CONTACT: 



(EOE) 



Hendry General Hospital 
Nursing Administration 
500 W. Sugarland Hwy. 
Clewlaton, Florida 33440 
(B13) 983-9121 Ext. 248 or 211 






l^fESvMW 



MarcIi 1, 1996 LaIceIancI Newspapers CLASSIFIED. 





VAKW.v/yy-?-j:- m .<-"-'. 



Wimmmk 

■■,■:■ ■■■ 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Ttnie 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmc 



TEACHER'S AID 

EXPERIENCE HELPFUL 

GRAYSLAKE 
DAYCARE 

(847) 548-3455 



A 



SECRETARY 

9 MO. SOIGOL SECRETARY 

Computer/Light Bookkeeping 
Skills 10 Paid Holidays & 
Ucalth/Dcntal Available 

Hour* 7:45 un. ■ 4:00 pm. 
Startiog Saliry 17 J5 per bout 

Mundclcin High School 

1350W.II*wleySL 

Mundclcin, IL 60060 



■y; 



m 



P ^ 

Property Manager 

Profession^ rraragement compa- 
ny b xcktng i arwr-oricmed 
IndMdtul with strong orginln- 
tlonal skills. Must enjoy busy 
office envtronmenL Prior renul 
experience necessary. Weekend 
work required along wilh supe rv1- 
slon of mai ntenance staff. GREAT 
BENEFITS. Northwest suburbs. 

Fax resume 
(708) 218-4928 



ifc 



rffl 



JU 




AAiKAi^AAAA 



11 



CONCRETE 
CONSTRUCTION 



Small concrete contractor in 
Island Lake is looking for 
experienced workers with 

knowledge of Framing, form 
work and or cement finishing. 
CDL licensing helpful. Call 

(847)526-9107 



TECHNICIAN 

Wanted: hardworking 
individuals w/CDL license, 
good driving record, self- 
motivated. Good wages & 
benefits. Must be able to do 
physical labor. 

(847) 884-8602 

EOE 



with 5 years frame 

experience. Immediate 

opening. Good pay 

for qualified person. 

BELV1DERE 
AUTO BODY 

[1705 BehtderefRt. 120)] 
Waukegan 

(708) 249-1177 



Experienced 
Auto Body Painter 



• Full-lime position 

• Medical benefit* 

• Paid vacation* 

• Clean environment 

• Excellent opportunity 

• Paid schooling 

apply in ptnon a I 

Car Tkch Curator 
(847) 244-4484 

lUEdUonCl. 
Wauktean, IL G0085 



ga m w i i i m i i in- «j 

LHsulbtiUorVWarehouus 
COLONIAL HEALTHCARE 

SOTHJ CO. inii^ medial tfatrib- 

ilion conraiy, is letkini quilificd, Idm- 
orienled people to join our rapidly 
MpaJing comptny. 

DISTRIBUTION CENTER 

MATERIALS HANDLER 

Mil Shift* 

11:15am -8pm 

(Moi.-Frt) 

*2nd Shift* 

3pm-ll:45pm 

(Varied Days) 

Qualified etndidalef must hi\c jmend 
wirchou* & forkWl experience. Ability 
lo lift 70 lbs. on i regulu basis i truss. We 
offer in excellent income potential 
(JM(Vr*. for eiperienced bidmiimli) A 
benefits rij. tndudmi 40IK, heihh & 
ileittil insurance, for further info., plcuc 
call: (W7) JJ8-2900 & ui for Norma 
Trice or send letter of inierest/naurne to: 

E.R. Der*., COLONIAL HEALTH- 
CARE surrLY co, 555 0i1m»j 

RA.LakflZuridi.IL 60047 

etc mlf .-:*.»*»»•* 
iiuiiiimu ini i — 




c 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



miD2 srsL£ 

SUPERVISOR 

Small manufacturer needs 
capable person, good wilh 
figures and skilled at analyz- 
ng problems. 

SEND RESUME TO: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney SI. 

DoxF 
Cray slake, I L 60030 



HEALTH CLERK 

AVON SCHOOL is seeking a 
Health Clerk three days a 

week until Jury I, 1996, then 
going (o 5 days per week 

7:3f>l:00pjn. 
Starting pay J6V72 hourly. 

Application cat be obtMned 
at the District Offiet 

4S0 N. Barron Blvd. 
Cmyslakc.IL 60030. 



REMINDER... 

THE NIW AREA CODE TOR OUR 

ARFAIS(M7) 



© 



& 



White Hen Pantry 

NEW OWNERSHIP TAKING OVER 

WHITE HEN PANTRY 

815 S. Lake St. • Mundeleln 

Fall A Part Time Positions Available For Alt Shifts 
CALL FOR AN INTERVIEW 

(847) 546-6111 

Ask for Pat or Betty, 



/ 



(847) 546-7447 
Ask for Uxor Debbie 




All positions available 

• Cooks • Counter 

Help • Car Hops 

Days, evenings & weekends 

Paid Training 

Apply In Person 

SAT. MARCH 2nd, 10 am-3 pm 
WED. MARCH 6th, 3 pm-7 pm 

Corner Rollins Rd. & Washington, Ingleslde 
(847) 587-6808 



AUNTIE ANNE'S JOB FAIR1 

Auntie Anne's, a leader La the 'pretzel retailing' revolution, Is 

opening a new store in the 50 's food court at Gumee Mills 

mall. To become a part of our success and Join our store 

opening team, please apply In person. 

Job Fair 

Friday - Saturday - Sunday / 1 p.m. - 6 p jn. 

(Look for our table, In front of our new store In food court) 

• Part time, full time, flexible hours - days, evenings, 

weekends. (We'll work around your schedule?) 

• Great Starting Pay • A fun place to work 

• No experience necessary 

For more information, call: (312) 338-5302, cxt 729 

equal opportunity employer 



P— 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Q: Dcar...Scarch: I have been considering lodging a formal com- 
plaint against a certain supervisor in our company that 1 believe is 
unfair and discriminating in his scheduling and appointing of various 
duties on a "who's been nice to me basis." I believe that these tasks 
should be assigned in an appropriate manner rather than what 
appears lo be favoritism. This practice of his is quite noticiblc by 
everyone in the department, and everyone is afraid for their job if 
they rock the boat with this guy. I hive been warned by a few of my 
friendly co-workers to be careful on how I handle this and yet have 
been egged on by others lo just do it. I have been working for this 
company for the past 6 years and wish to continue to be employed 
here, that is why I am writing to you. Please guide me with what you 
think is the right way to handle this. Thank you. G.K. - Vernon Hills. 

Ai Dear O.K. You have not mentioned what type of company you 
work for. The reason 1 say this is because if you are with a company 
who is unionized, you will most likely have a formal grievance pro- 
cedure. If you are not, your company may still have a set procedure 
that should be used for. any complaints wilh the exception of a legal 
matter such as sexual harassment, which should be handled through 
an attorney. In other cases such as yours, the proper channel Is for a 
person lo proceed wilh their direct supervisor. Most problems can be 
settled in this first stage, if presented professionally. If for any reason 
this docs not work, or you feel as though the problem is your super- 
visor, you should have the right lo go to the next higher position in 
most cases that would be a manager of that supervisor. If you arc not 
happy with either of these steps, proceed to Human Resource depart- 
ment, who should have an open door if they are an effective depart- 
ment. This department will likely handle your situation Impartially 
and your problem shoutd be held In confidence. Human Resources 
should be the ulltrnate in trying to resolve an employee problem. 
(Please note that you can bypass your supervisor, if you feel more 
comfortable go directly lo Human Resources.) Some companies 
request that you put grievances in writing. Although putting it on 
paper does outline that situation, keep in mind that once something is 
in writing it belongs to the world. You certainly don't want anything 
coming back lo haunt you. In the event your company docs nol have 
any type of grievance procedures, make the suggestion lo the presi- 
dent of the company, in writing, that you would tike to make the sug- 
gestion in order to foster freedom of expression among all employees. 
Offer to be on a committee that will outline a possible plan. In other 
words.. .make yourscIT a hero. Professionalism is the key here. Hope 
this help out. Good luck! 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and Prcsidenl of Superior Personnel in Gumec, 
Letters can be sent to Nancy al 4949 Grand Ave., 
Oumec.lL 60031. . *<***' 



220 



HdpVntod 
PuH-Tlme 




Help Warned 

Full-Tbrw 



HOTEL/MOTEL 

Following Positions 
Available 

* Front Desk Manager 
* Front Dosk Clark 

Bright, PI oat ant Personality, 

Good Communication* t 

Math Skills A Must 

xApply In porwn 

RED CARPET INN 

S207 BUCKLEY BD. 
North Chicago 



GENERAL 



Phone orders & 
data entry. Flexible 
hours, Wauconda 
location. 
(847) 526-9200 

Ask for 
Kevin or Paul 



TEAM DRIVERS 

HOME EVERY WEEK - DEDICATED BUN 



Competitive Pay w/Weekry Pay 
Load/Unload Pay 

Vacation/Health Insurance 

Hi Require: 

Verifiable OTR Experience 
Good Driving Record 



Lato Model Conventional) 
Ajrigncd Tractor* 



Drug Screening 

Meet DOT Requirements 



For Interview Call Cathy or Steve at 

1-815-224-2223 or 1-800-228-4291 



We've been providing chemical and 
bloremearch actentlata with pipette*, 
tips, and disposable products tor over 
30 years. Continued expansion In our 
Research and De velopment gro ups 
has created the following opening In 
the San Francisco Bay area: 

MECHANICAL 
ENGINEER 

Design and develop instrument 
products and high-volume 
disposables. Create and use product 
specs, descriptions, and test results 
to initiate conceptual and breadboard 
phases; refine designs through 
various testing phases, and draft 
documentation. Will also support 
existing products. BSME or advanced 
degree with 2-4 years' experience; 
injection molded plastic parts design 
experience preferred. 

If you're looking lor a new challenge 
and relocation to a more moderate 
climate seems enticing, please send 
your resume ASAP to the Engineering 
Coordinator, Rainln Instrument Co., 
Inc. 5400 HoJIis St., Emeryville. CA 
94608. INTERVIEWS WILL BE 
CONDUCTED IN THE CHICAGO 
AREA MARCH 3-5. Non-smoking 
environment. An equal opportunity 
employer. 



IffOTU aw rcow: 



£001 

ECT¥iE[ 



Go with a Winner! 




NOW HIRING 

We are an exciting Home Improvement Center 

serving the Fox Lake area with 

•Building Materials 'Hardware 'Electrical 

•Mlllwork 'Wallcoverings *Floorcoverlngs 

'Plumbing 'Housewares 

Wc arc looking for Friendly, Helpful and 

Hardworking People who want either a Part Time 

Job to Earn Extra Income or a Full Time Job with 

Great Career Opportunities. 

Perfect for Retirees, Students, or 

Moms and Dads with Kids in School. 

JOIN OUR TEAM! 

'Cashiers 'Sales Associates 'Manager Trainees 

No experience necessary! 

We'll train you to help our Customers! 

YOU WILL FIND... 

Excellent Pay and Benefits 

Instant Profit Sharing Bonus 

Saturday & Sunday Bonus Pay 

Associate Discounts on Purchases 

Advancement Opportunities 
Flexible Part Time Work Hours 
If you are interested in a rewarding career with tremen- 
dous growth opportunities in die Home 
Improvement Industry or just looking for a great 
place to earn some extra money... 

COME IN - LET'S TALK! 

1400 S. U.S. H\VY 12 • Foi Lake 

or Fax your resume to us at 847-973-3056 
Monday-Saturday from 9 AM - 7 PM 




Find out why we are better than the rest 

and why we are the fastest growing Home 

Improvement Center In the Upper Midwest! 




f| Help Wanted 
U Fill-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



"RECEPTIONIST* 

HigKind Put Lincoln Mercury li look- 

bi( for i Put Tune RecqibcrnM to join 

our turn of nrnfenionali. Onod Pm 

Ark for Mthde Beyer 

HIGHLAND PARK 

LINCOLN MERCURY 

847-831-5880 



PLASTICS 

Experienced set-up \ 
person needed for | 
injection molding shop, 
Call (847) 546-4611. 



HOME 
TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 
$45,000 income potential. 

Call 1-800-513-4343 
Ext B-4458 



HVAC 

Service lech 

HVAC (relators Experienced 
Entry Level _ — 

(847) 223-2399 



& 



WOODWORKER 

Display fixture manufacturer 
seeks production workers for 
woodwork operation. Dudes 
to Include Light assembly and 

sanding. No experience 
necessary. Apply In person: 

W&W Displays 

401 S. Washington f 10 or 8 
Mundeleln 



ACCOUNTING 
CLERK 

Experienced with A/R & A/P. 
General office duties Include 
tiling, phonos, word pro- 
cessing, & special projects. 
Must be detail oriented with 
good computer & communi- 
cation skills. Non-smoking 
sales office. Mundeleln. 

847-949-8070 



MEN/WOMEN 

inside & Outside Sales & Marketing positions. 

Teamwork managing style, strong incentive 
compensation package Call for office interview 

Ask far Chuck : 
S47-995-0905 



GREAT OPPORTUNITIES! 

iKolry Sorvices, l ho nation's leading starting support company,! 
Ihas more Jobs than we can (ill for Lake County's largosl| 
lomployors. We havo openings lor 

r Administrative Assistants 'Order Packers 
['Secretaries 'Assemblers 

■Typists 'Inspectors 

[•Clerks 'General Warehouse 

•Receptionists/Switchboard 

I Many positions otter temp-to-perm opportunities. Bring yourl 
IskJlls and good work habits lo Kelly and receive not Just groal| 
| pay, but great benefits tool Kelr/s benefits Include; 

■Paid Holidays. *Pald Vacations 

|*Ma]or Medical Insurance ■Free Computer Training | 

■•Tuition Reimbursement *Reterral Bonuses 

■•Child Car* Discount 

Call today to start your new career 

MEiiyss* 

847-367-1144 



tiberiyvtHe 



Equal Opportunity Employer Ntfver An AppoirrtiTMot Fee 



LEARN BARTENDING 

NOW OPEN IN GURNEE 



a Pat Tuiti-yi ''orr. Earning 
-"• Day o' » - •'"- £wbc£' ' 

~ Est n l£€?. 
Professional Bartenders Seril. 

CAU312-B-A-R-T-E-N-D 




ATTBirnON 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 
If you have placed claaalficd 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another turn re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To recetve prop- 
er, credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
roust be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 368 

SO S. Whitney St. 

arayslake, U. 00030-0268 



S39 



Housekeeping 




I WILL CLEAN YOUR 
HOUSE on a woekltbr-woek- 
ty basis. Very thorough, de- 
pendable. Non-smoker. Refer- 
ences. (847) 546-3759 leave 
message. 



MEAN MAIDS! 

WE HATE AND 

TERMINATE DIRT. 

WE WILL CLEAN YOUR 

HOME WEEKLY, 

BI-WEEKLY OR 

ANYTIME. 
(B47) 746-2245. 



rboubir KK~K}ear\ing^ 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



-Professional Cleaning 
-Reasonable Rates 

-Dependable 
-Great References 



We Take Pride in What We Do 
S5 OFF ON FIRST INITIAL CLEANING 

wtm THIS COUPON 

CALL KIM FOR A FREE IN-HOME QUOTE 
j (708) 546-3408 i 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Check This 

Section Each 

Week! 



S72 



S93 



TrccsrTlaats 



Professional 
Services 



INEXPENSIVE 

INDIVIDUAL/FAMILY 

HEALTH OR LIFE 

INSURANCE. 
Call (or tree quote. ■ ■ • 
*• * 1-800*46-6605 ;• ■* ** 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Wholesale Seasoned Hoidwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

. .947-526-0858. 



m ^-m ** — •*' ' 




CLASSIFIED IaIclUwI Newspapers MarcIi 1, 1996 



i 
| 






ft 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FnU-Tlme 



BEGIN YOUR CAREER IN 
TELECOMMUNICATIONS WITH 

METRO ONE 

wa are currently hiring for the position of 
ENHANCED INFORMATION OPERATOR 

All shifts available. Full and Part Tlma Positions.- 

Come In and fill out an application at 

1601 Feohanvilte Road, Suite 500. Mount Prospect 

(708) 827-6767 

Salary starts at $aoo. Groat Benefits, 

If you have a good telephone voice, 

strong spelling and typing skills and know your 

mldwestam geography ttite Job Is tor youl 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



240 


Child Care 



FIVE STATION BEAUTY 
SALON. Equipment, Inven- 
tory, Client list. Exlrn equip- 
ment also tor salo. Worloslab- 
Ishod, 30yrs. Tako advantago 
of this groat opportunity. (847) 
587-2755 call lor Informallon. 

IN-HOME BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITY. 

Slutting envelopes tor money! 

Send SASE to: NLN Systoms, 

P.O. Box 876, Lako Villa, III. 

60O46-0B76. 

MAKE BIG MONEY and 
stay noaflhyl I'll provo this Is 
the best small business oppor- 
tunity anywhoro. with no pa- 
perwork, Invonlory, loos or" 
risk. 11 help you bo succosslul 
and Improve your lole. 1-800- 
775-0712 ox. 6084. 

SUCCESSFUL GARAGE 
DOOR BUSINESS FOR 
SALE. LOCATED IN LAKE 
COUNTY. Our business 
sorvos ail of Lako County as 
woll as parts of Cook County, 
McHonry County and parts o( 
Wisconsin. Established In 
1990, our company has soon 
growth and contlnuod profit for 
the past six years. A ported 
business opportunity (or the 
sort employed Individual, com- 
mitted lo serving the commun- 
ity with quality and Integrity. A 
working knowledge of the Ga- 
rage Door Industry b neces- 
sary lo succeed, but wo will be 
available tor short term train- 
ing, tl you aio serious about 
stopping Into a prolltabto busi- 
ness, please call (847) 740- 
0355 for moro do talis. Serious 
Inqu/rfos onry ploaso. 



Personal Freedom 

Tired of making money for every- 
ono but youraoll? Fantastic oppor- 
tunity witn growing tatecommuni- 
cations co. offers personal free- 
dom and the choice lo motivate 
olhors Callnnw(Ht5^7r,^S45, 



sssa a 



MICHIGAN - Cassopolis 

Restaurant/Real 

bstatc/liquip. list. bus. 

Good cash flow, local tourist. 

Overlooking Stone take. 

Income S75K4 this yr. Out of 

State owner "Las Vegas" with 

other interests. 

By U\mer. Act now 

616-445-0191 



Machinist/Shop Mgr. 

Live A. work in «mall town FC 

Pattneritup offer Tor right pcrton 

Who could expand thii profitable 

business. Owner would tike to retire 

m a couple of in. K»cel in all 

ptoses CNC/CAD/Manual/W'cld. 

CROSS CREBK MACHINE, 

Ted 352-466-0398 



240 


Child Care 



^JiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiLy 

= ALL SttEL RiilJiRllil, = 
= Cimntreiil, Aulcdlturi == 

= k«lNiit| DEALERSHIPS it illilli.= 
= Blj Pilinllil Pnfiti turn ulii = 
= IM ttnilrmllii. If qiiillfliJ, = 
kgf rtcliry dirtel fnm ^ 
= Hillmil Mutufiilarir, ss 
= [303| 7S9J20Q, Ml. 1100. EE 

fllllllllllllllijllllilllllllllllllllllllllllr; 



Opportunity 
Knocks 

Here's your chance to join 
a fast growing telecom 
munications co. Make 
money without losing your 
personal freedom. Call 
today! 

(847) 639-1375 



raiif««HWH>4*r l « n i 



240 



CHILD CARE IN my Haryan 
Farms Homo In Grayslake. All 
ages. Prices' negotiable At 
your convenience. (847) 
223-6165. __ 

CHILD CARE IN MY Round 
Lako Park homo. Call Mary 
Schooll. (7 08) 546-2047. 

EVENING DAY CARE 
PROVIDED by licensed Prac- 
tical Nurso with fl/yrs. oxport- 
onco In Earty Childhood Edu- 
cation. Structured activities. 
Mundololn area. (847) 
566-9372. • 

EXPERIENCED, LI- 

CENSED PROVIDER has 
oponlngs In Iter Homo Day- 
care Program. Ages 2 & up, 
lull-tlmo only. Call Dobbio 
(847) 265-1514 alter 6pm. 

FOX LAKE MOM/PRE- 
SCHOOL leachor wilh 12yrs. 
oxporionco has oponlngs Jn 
her homo. Educational activi- 
ties, crafts, playtime. Excellent 
rolorcnces. Reasonable rales. 
Full/Pa/1-IImo. Infante Wof- 
come. Pam (847) 973-1369. 

GURNEE MOM WILL care 
for your child In her Itomo. 
(647) 855-1372. 

HAWTHORN WOODS 
GRANDMA with back-up will 
give TLC, moals. snacks and 
lull-tlmo attention to tod- 
dlorsAntants. Expertoncod. 
(B47, 550-6731. 

IMMEDIATE! 

Housekeeper/ Chlldcare 

Nood (Hi, 

In my Highland Park 

home, flexible day hours. 

Including Saturday. 

English speaking. 

Own transportation. 

Approximately $200. 

(847) 831-0696 or 

(708)901-5777, pager. 

ISLAND LAKE MOM will 
caro lor your child, Exporlonco 
with all ages. Meals and 
snacks provided. Reloroncos. 
(847) 487-0418. 

LAKE VILLA/ROUND 

LAKE BEACH mom ol 2, un- 
derstands Importance ol a nu- 
turing environment. Wilt care 
lor your child In hor homo. 
Ftoxlblo hours full/part-time. 
Susan (647) 265-8227. 

LOCATED AT THE Intersec- 
tion ol Gilmer and Midlothian 
roads. Full or part-time child- 
care. Non-smoker, with groat 
references. (847) 566-2732. 

LOOKING FOR DAY 

CARE? Experienced mom 
with oxcollonl reloroncos 
knows the noed for quality 
care (or your child. Reason- 
able ralos, lull-tlmo, Monday- 
Friday. Located near 83 & Mo- 
rv-ivllk) Rd. Call Shlrtoy (847) 
356-7954. 

LOVING MOM OF 2-1/2yr. 
old son willing lo babysit, tull 
or part-time, In my. ctoan 
Spring Grove homo, 1st & 3rd 
shlfl.Suo (815)675-2548. 

LOVING, CERTIFIED ART 
Toachor has opening lor 3- 
5/yrs., also alter school. Arts, 
crafts, learning programs. 
Meals Included. Flexible 
hours. Call McKonna (847) 
263-0142. 

LOVING, ISLAND LAKE 

MOM has lull-tlmo oponlngs 
lor ages 2 & up. Breakfast, 
lunch and snacks. Playroom, 
tun activities, dally storytlmo. 
Dally helpers. Low rates. (847) 
487-1702. 



LOVING, RELIABLE, NON- 
SMOKER parents, collogo 
educated In child caro and do- 
votopmont, 14yrs. oxporionco. 
Lots ol toys, stories, projects, 
In our clean now homo, 
snacks, oxcollonl roforoncos. 
Spring Grove/Richmond aroa 
(olf 173, oast of Rl. 12), (815) 
875-1143. 

MOM OF 2 will babysit In my 
homo. Largo yard and play 
aroa. Trovor/Wllmot aroa. 
Roasonablo ralos. Snacks, 

moats, loir, ol activities and 
TLC. (414)862-0572. 

MOTHER OF 1 will babysit 
In my Round Lako Beach 
homo. Monday-Friday, (847) 
740-1383. 

MOTHER OF 1 will caro for 
your child In my Wlnlhrop Har- 
bor homo. Days or ovonlngs. 
Pleaso call (847) 746-6215. 

MOTHER OF 1 will caro lor 
your Infant or loddlor lull-tlmo 
In my now Round Lako homo. 
Noar 120 & Falrllold. (847) 
740-1982. __ 

MOTHER OF 2 lias full/parl- 
llmo oponlngs. Roasonablo 
rales, roforoncos. Rl. 12 & Fox 
Lako Rd. (647) 497-9201. 

PART-TIME CHILD CARE 
NEEDED In our Llbortyvlllo 
homo. 1-2 days por wook. 2 
children. (847) 918-0014. 

PROFESSIONAL NANNY 
HAS Monday-Wodnosday-Fri- 
day oponlngs. Responsible, 
caring child caro In your homo. 
Roforoncos available Ton 
yoars oxporionco. (847) 
473-5419. 

MarI<ET 





KENMORE 
DRYER, good 



ELECTRIC 
condition, 



$125, (847) 949-9938, 

REFRIGERATOR 'EXCEL- 
LENCE". IN oxcollonl condi- 
tion. Asking S125. (847) 
689-0148 atier 4pm. 



310 



BazaarsA'.rafls 



TWO THOUSAND PIECES 

ol ceramics, soma blsquo and 
greenware. Also cralt sup- 
plies, paints, brushes. (414) 
534-5457. 



314 


Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE 
5.000+ slzos. 30x40x10 
$5,361. 40x60x14 $9,551. 
50x60x12 $10,507. 

50x100x16 $16,755. 

80x80x14 $15,583. 

60x100x16 $19,233. Quality 
sorvico, oxcollonco. Free 
brochures. Sontlnol Buildings, 
600-327-0790. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 




324 



330 



340 



FOR SALE HAY & STRAW. 
Hay llrst culling Alfalfa, $2.50 
por bate. Slraw $2.00 por balo. 
Largo Balos. (847) 395-8450, 

(414)857-6477. 

Garage 
Hummaftc Sale 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 
BIG SALE, and Ihoro Is still 
Ihlngs that (us* did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
poporo and run ft under Iho 
'FREE or Glvoa ways' classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS oro 
NO CHARGEI (708) 

gg.l-fl161 .ox1. 140. 

Household Goods 
Furniture 

EASY ^HAIR, SOFA and 
Lovosoat, Bluo, Mauvo, 
Croam. $575. LEATHER 
sora and lovosoal, $950. Ex- 
cellent condlllon. MUST SELLI 
(708)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bod- 
room, comploto $1,100. Din- 
ing room Ml. $1,700. OAK 
bedroom sot $1,200, Oak 
dlnlngroom sot $1,980. 
ALSO Slofgh bodroom sol. 
$1,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELLI 
(708)548-1045. 

1988 MAGNAVOX 41IN. 
big screen TV. S750/bosl. 
(414) 694-2262. 



Child fare 



COMPUTER PACKARD 

BELL 2B6 with printer, $225. 
Call Stan (847) 360-9333. 

NEC MULTISYNC II, color 
monitor, 14ln, $150. NEC DPI, 
24 pin dot matrix printer, $100. 
Acer 710 PC/XP compatblo 
with STB muitl ros II VGA 
adaplor, mouse and |oystlck, 
$50. (847) 249-8173. 

PACKARD BELL LAPTOP 
386, now factory replace- 
ment, mouse, modem, power 
supply, 150HD, carrying caso, 
$800. (847) 395-2080 days 
only. 

WORD PROCESSOR 

SMITH CORONA, with 
scroon and Instruction book, 
utility disc, $200. (847) 
680-6484. 



BRASS QUEEN SIZE BED 
wilh now deluxo matlross, still 
In plastic. $250 including 
Iramo. Will dollvor. (B47) 
374-9882. 

CHINA HUTCH 2-DOOR 
china hutch In medium/dark 
brown with Inskto display light, 
good condition, S325. (847) 
587-1513. 

COUCH AND LOVESEAT, 
contemporary stylo, Ian. vory 
good condition. $375. Wads- 
WQrth (847) 263-8359. 

COUNTER FLOW WALL 
FURNACE, gas, 65,000 
BTU, blower, $250. Whirlpool 
Mlcrowavo, $75. (847) 
546-2942. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOME CONTENTS 

Sofa/lovosoat sol, hunter 
groen and cranberry, $595. 
Sofa/lovosoat sot, earth tones, 
5695. Other sols, plaids, 
slripos, florals, ole. Dining- 
room sot, 10-ploco, $1,595. 
Bodroom sols, etc. (847) 329- 
4119. 

KING SIZE WATERBED 
Land & Sky soflsklo isolation. 
Paid $900. Bost otlor. Only 2- 
1/2yrs. old. (414) 652^4665. 

KING SIZE WATERBED 
wtth hoadboard. Asking S100. 
(847) 395-9292 altor 5:30pm. 

KINGSIZE WATERBED, 

MIRRORED hoadboard, &- 
drawers In baso, 5350/best. 
(847) 740-8257 ovonlngs 
only. 

LOVESEAT/HIDE-A-ED. 
BLUE, BEIGE and brown 
strlpo. 3yrs. old. $200. (414) 
857-2227. 

SOFA & LOVESEAT NEW 
NEVER USED boaulflul B4ln. 
Oft whito, shell back design. 
Will sacritico. Asking $625. 
(847) 374-9882. 

QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, 
good condition. SiOO/best. 

(847) 487-0210. 

■^ — ^^— ^^^— 

SEWING/EMBROIDERY 
MACHINE, NEW Homo 
8000, Excollont condition, 
$1,575, Call Pat (847) 
362-7336. 

TWO QUEEN SIZE WA- 
TERBEDS. Everything Includ- 
ed. $150 eadVbost. (708) 625- 
9776 altor 5pm. 



VENDING MACHINES 11 
TABLETOPS. Throo In loca- 
tions; olhor locations avoll- 
ablo. Brand now condlllon. 
$4.400/bosl. (414) 057-79 IB 
loa vo message. __ 

LOCKING ETCHED 
GLASS GUN CABINET. Holds 
6 rllkts and storage lor amo. 
S70. (2) 30 gallon aquariums 
with wood cablnols, lighted 
hoods, lully oqulppod wilh 
fish. $100/oach. (047) 249- 
4457. 

LOOKING FOR PERSON 
to Iransport lawn mow- 
or/oqulpmonl to Florida. Who- 
novor? Cash paid. (407) 
360-4021.(407)568-3462. 

ORGAN-LOWREY, $300. 
CHINA cabinot, $100. LHosty,- 
or Exordso blko, digital llmor, 
SI 50. (414) B57-7918 loavo 
mossapo. 

SNOWPLOW FITS JEEP, 
compfolo. (414) 857-7312. 
(414)657-2044. 

SOFTUB SPA GREAT for 
docks, basomonts, family- 
room. Vory portable. Call to 
soo. Will dollvory. (847) 
746-61 10 ovonlngs. 

SWIMMING POOL, MU- 
SKIN Fairmont, 1511. round, 
abovo ground, 411. doop, 
brand now, sllll In box. Pool & 
liner. Lists S700. Asking 
$350/Tlrm. (847) 740-^007. 

WANTED: HOMEOWN- 

ERSII KAYAK POOLS is 
looking (or Domo Homesrtos 
lo display tho now main- 
tenance froo KAYAK POOL. 
Savo thousands of $$$ wilh 
this unique opportunity. CALL 
NOW! t -800-31 KAYAK. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS 
TAN AT HOME Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE! Commorclal/Homo 
units Irom SI 99.00. Low 
monthly payments FREE 
Color Catalog. Call TODAY 
1-800-842-13C5. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE! Commorclal/homo 
units from $190. Low monthly 
paymonls. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1305, 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



DOG BOARDING- 
WHY LEAVE your 'IIHIo 
frktnd* In a pon whllo you vaca- 
tion. I can olfor dopondablo, 
rollnhlo caro lor your dog/pup 
In my homo. Lois of T.L.C. 
Loads ol groat- roforoncos and 
ravo rovlows. Call or loavo 
mossago al (847) 966-6319. 

ATI*ENTION PET OWN- 
ERS! 24hrs. 365 days a year, 
pol guardian program that 
pays REWARDS plus much 
moro. Only $0 poryoar. For In- ' 
lormnllon send $1 shipping & 
handling to PET PROTEC- 
TION, 20593 Vorona Avo., 
Lako Villa, III, 60046, or call 
630-223-3969 pager. (847) 
265-1256. 

CHAMPION AKC LAB PUP- 
PIES, block & yellow, 6/wks. 
old on 2/22. For further Infor- 
mal ion (815) 675-41 95. 

CHOW PUPPIES, ADOR- 
ABLE, 8 wooks, look liko 
small black boars. $300. (414) 
862-2230. 

COLLIE PUPPIES, OLD 
fashioned farm style. 1 year 
old adult female. $50. White fe- 
malo, $200. (414) 639-0195. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
with animals? Do you have 2 
hours por wook lo spare? Assl- 
si- Animal Foundation, ono of 
tho area's no-kill sholtors Is 
sooking volunloors for work 
that Is highly ro warding and 
lunl Wo nood mon and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phonos 
and other olllco duties. Wo aro 
locatod in Crystal Lake. For 
moro Information ploaso call 
(815)459-0990. 

EIGHT WEEK OLD MIXED 
PUPPIES FOR SALE. $10/oa. 
(847) 973-0225. 

FOR SALE 1-1/2 yr. old 
Green Iguana, 18(n. long. Por- 
locl health. Cage not Includod. 
Many extra's. Must soil. 
$75/llrm. Call Danlol (847) 
548-0455. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

PUPPY, 7/wooks old. AKC, 
llrst shots and first worming, 1- 
fomalo loft. S300. (047) 
740-ooaa. 

PUPPIES 
old. (847) 



ATTENTION DIABETICS! 

II you havo Modicaro or 

private insurance, wo can 

dollvor your supplies free and 

directly bill your Insurance, 

with no ha ss to lo you. 

Call lor details. 

Diabetic Supply Provldors 

M.E. 

1-B00-752-0261. 



ROTTWEILER 
AKC, wooks 
497-4562. 



HANDICAPPED 
MENT. GOOD 
Whool chair, 
652-3801. 



EQUIP- 

condlllon. 

otc. (414) 



SPRINGER SPANIEL 

PUPS, AKC. roady to go In 3 
wooks. $250/oa. (414) 
877-0348. 

TO GOOD HOME kinery le- 
malo cat, cuto black & white 
markings. (847) 244-7843. 

YELLOW LABRADOR 

PUPS, AKC registered. shot3, 
wormod, hoalth guaranteed. 
$400.(815)385-7414. 



358 



Musical Instruments 




BASS COMPLETE SET up, 
Ibanoz 6 string bassos. 12 
string acoustic. Hartko amplifi- 
er, 4x10, 1x15. Samson wire- 
loss. Call Scott (414) 
657-9557. 

PECAN WOOD UPRIGHT 
PIANO. Excollont condlllon. 
$1,000.(815)344-2499. 





R. 


E 


t**A, i r-»j 


D E R. . . „ 




THE 


NEW AREA 


CODE FOR 


OUR 








ARE A 1 


S (847) 





PET OF THE WEEK 



If* 1 M 



ft 



±\ 



349 


Clothing 



■s 






324 


Farm Guide 



COAT SHEARED MUSK- 
RAT, worn 4X, now $2,800. 
Must soli $1,800. Call Pat 
(414)654-3191. 

ONLY USED ONCEI Wod- 
dlng dross, lormal drosses, 
SLZQ 4. (847) 587-8023. 



fc 



[ 



Snow & Rusty 



CERTIFIED DAYCARE. 
MOTHER ol 2. My home, 
Monday-Friday. 6am-5:30pm. 
MoaLs/snacks provided. 
Fenced-in backyard. Please 
cafl (414) 654-5345. 

COMFORTABLE HOME 

CHILD CARE. You can count 
on. Infants wotcomo. (847) 
223-7581. 



MUNDELEIN MOM HAS 
openings In hor homo. Play- 
room, largo (oncod yard. Lots 
ol TLC. Meals and snacks pro- 
vided. Roforoncos. (847) 
949-5284 Kay. 

NEED CHILDCARE FOR 2 
children In my Grayslako 
homo, throo afternoons a 
wook. Ploaso call (708) 
223-6740. 



FIFTY CHOICE CALVES 
delivered direct to you on ap- 
proval. Free delivery on 10 
hoad or moro. Holstoln Hetf- 
ors. 10 days old, $150.00, Hol- 
stoln Bulls $100.00. Swiss 
Bulls $100. Guomsey Jersey 
Hollers $110. Call Bill Nolan 
715-758-B484 (INCN). 




RECYCLE @ 



AIR CONDITIONER, 

15,000 BTU, 220 volt, works 
groat, $275. (414) 694-1189. 

CANNON T-70 CAMERA, 
single lens redox, with 3 lens- 
es, $250. (847) 662-5920. 

CEMENT MOLDS AND 
slaluos, approximately 20 
molds and assorted Horns. 
$1,500. Frank (414) 
537-4003. 



"Snow" and "Rust)'" arc two 
adorable, one year old brother and 
sister mostly greyhound mines. 
Extremely attached and devoid to 
each other, iky must be adopted 
together. Snow is a lovely spayed 
" female. She has a pretty dove-white 
coal scattered with Light brown 
dapples and expressive brown 
eyes. Snow has a sued, quid, calm and lovcable disposition and she 
just glows when you give her attention. This genile girl looks lo Rusty 
for encouragcmenl and guidance 

Rusty is a handsome ncuterd male wilh a reddish brown coal 
highlighted wiUi black and while. Rusty is a real characler, full of fun- 
loving playfulness, and like his sister he responds joyfully to affection 
and attention. Both dogs are good with children and possess the quali- 
ties lhat people have come to admire in the greyhound breed Here 
since April of I W>> this wonderful pair would love logo home wilh you 
for ihe holidays! Cage 30. 

Cash $55 donation (per dog) includes free spay/neuter, collar, tag, 
leash, first shots, follow-up care, and much more. . 

Orphans of Ihe Storm is located at 2200 Riverwoods Rd, 
Decrfield. Hours arc II a.m. - 5 p.m., seven days a week. Call (708) 
945-0235 for further information. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



GUNS I 

SHOTGUNS, RIFLES, 

PISTOLS, ANTIQUES 

(847) 223-551 8, 

PIANOS WANTED. C/ 

lor any piano under 40ln. lalt. 
In nood ol repair or not. (4141 
248-6491. ' 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or Parts 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nfckolodaon and 
Coke Machines. Piyinrj 
CASH! Call (708)985-2742. 




PSI 

i: :,-:^. 

BEAUTIFUL 2-STORY, 2- 
BEDOOM, fully docoralod, 
custom shados, nice land- 
scape, huge yard. Country 
Walk Subdivision, $125,000 
FSBO. (647) 265-1799. 

BUILD YOUR DREAM 
homo wilh no downpayment 
on materials. Becomo an own- 
er-Involved builder and savo 
$ $ S while building equity. 
Miles Homos offers attractive 
construction financing. 

Choose from 50 stylos and 
floorplans. Call MUos Homos 
today al 1-800-343-2864. 

BY OWNER! 

Looking for a Great 

Starter or Retirement 

Homo? This throo 
bodroom, quality built, 

country charmer In 

Grayslake Is in move-In 

condition. This home Is In 

a super location, close to 

downtown, Jones Island 

and across from 

Woodvlew Elementary 

School. Many amenities 

an Included; Fanced-ln 

yard, 2-1/3 car g«r«o*. 

Urge patio, mntt rrmturm 

trees. All major 

appliances are Included. 

$124,900. 

349 Alleghany, 

(847) 223-4490. 



FOR SALE BY OWNER 2- 
bodroom home InTrovor, WI. 
Largo kltchon and UvlnQroom, 
2-1/2 car garago, on largo 
comor lot. Comptoloty redono, 
new kltchon and bath, root 
and siding, lumaco. caipet, 
otc. Low taxes. Lake rights 
and launch 1/4 btoek. $77,900. 
No Agents. (414) 0G2-6017. 










BOSCH REVERSIBLE 

DRILL. S100/tlrm. (708) 625- 
9776 altor 5pm. 

CRAFTSMAN 10" RADIAL 
ami saw, brand now, 
S4S0fcost. (414) 862-9309. 

LEROI PORTABLE AIR 
COMPRESSOR, ISOctm, 4- 
cyllndor diosol onglno, 1,700 
hours, $3,500. (414) 
657-3606. 



's 



a® 



Grandvillc Court 
Apartments 

Brand New Premiere, 

1 & 2 bedroom apartments, 

Near beautiful park, with 

balconies, mini-blinds, 

all appliances, garages 

available. On-site manager. 

Call for showing 

(847) 625-0093 
==♦ = 



FOX LAKE/SPRING 

GROVE BUILDERS MODEL. 
Deluxo 4-bodroom, co- 
dar/brlck, 2-story on woodod 
acre, 2-1/2 batha (another 
roughod In), English base- 
ment, 3-car garago. $18,000 
bo low market value. 2-fumac- 
es, 2-air condll loners, Ihormo- 
pano windows with storms 
and scroens, woodbumlng 
fireplace, Jacuzzi, marina near- 
by. If you quality lo buy a 
house of this quality, Its roady 
to movo into. Ronl option/con- 
tract possible (847) 526- 
5755. 



1 



NG 
EL. 
CO- 

her 

ISO- 
OOO 
liic- 
mo- 
rms 
ilng 
sar- 
/ a 
ady 
;on- 
i26- 



MARck 1, T996 LaIceIancI Newspaper CLASSIFIED 




500 



Homes For Sale 



FOR SALE BY OWNER 
Extra largo houso w»h molhor- 
In-law apartmont. 4+ bod- 
rooms, pool, 2-1« car garago, 
lull basement, comor lot, 2 
largo docks. Must soo. Foi 
largo lamlly. $155,000, (847) 
546-6117. Open Houn 
March 3rd., 1pm-4pm, 
909 Mayfteld Dr., Round 
Lake Boach. 

GRAYSLAKE HOUSE 
ZONED commorcial -CBA, 
50x130 lot. 2-story, 3-bod- 
room. Conlor Strool. 
$149,000. Kurryl (847) 
223-1 873. 

GRAYSLAKE NEW TOWN- 
HOUSE, ond unit, 3-bod- 
rooms, 2-balhs, (amllyroom, 
2-car garago, A/C, all ap- 
pliances Included. And much 
mora. lGOOsq.lt. of living area. 
$139,900. <B47) 548-8530. 

HOMES FOR PENNIES 
ON THE $11 

Thousands ol government 

foroclosod and repossessed 

prop otl k>s being llquldalod 

thts month! For lists In your 

area call toll Iroe 7 days! 
1(600)695-7810 EXT. 1429. 

ISLAND LAKE NEW raised 
ranch. 3-bodroom, 2-balh, 2- 
1/2 car garago, C/A. dock, 

$170.900. (847) 526-5837. 

LAKE VILLA,, 1991 Trt-tovol. 
1, 750sq.lt., 3-bodrooms, 2- 
baths, largo kitchen, (amlly- 
room. Irvlmjroom, C/A, 2-1/2 
car garago. Appointment only. 
$147.500, (847) 587-9014. 

UBERTYVILLE COLONI- 
AL, 4-BEDROOMS, 2-1/2 
baths, , 2-car garago, 
2.700sq.lt., full basomont, 
don, nowty docoratod, almost 
1/3 aero lot, oxcollorrt location 
and schools, $254,900. (847) 
367-7284. 

LINDENHURST RENT TO 
own, only $1,300 down buys 
now 3-bodroom, 2-bath trt-lov- 
el, 2-car garago, llroplaco. 
$1 ,300/month. (708) 
223-3269. 

OPEN HOUSE Sunday. 
March 3rd,, 1pm-4pm, 148 
Knobb Hill Ln.. Gumoo, South 
Rldgo. By owner, 3-bedrooms, 
2.5 baths, 2-car attached ga- 

raQu. catnedrBl colling, oal-ln 

kRchon, firoplaco, C/A, parllal 
basomont, oxtondod dock, 

professionally landscaped, 
stove, rolrigoralor, built-in 
dishwasher, great family 
neighborhood. No realtors. 
$179,900. (847) 855-8302. 

OWN YOUR OWN HOME 

INJ EASY STEPS11 

Save Tlmo And M onoy-FREE 

Roport Shows Howl I 

Send Namo, Address, 

$2.00 (PAH): HOMES, 

26479 Old McHonry. Dopt. 12, 

Lake Zurich. II. 60047. 

UNIQUE 3.QO0SQ.FT. 

HOME, 4-bodrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, extromory largo kitch- 
en, rocroom with llroplaco and 
hot tub, 3-car garago with 
work shop, large lot, possblo 
In-law anangomont. Grays- 
lake Schools. $151,900 By 
Owner. (847) 546-6954. 

WADSWORTH (1861) 4- 
BEDROOM farmhouse, polo 
bam, 2-car garago, 2-wotls. 
Newer: codar roof, siding, 
windows, furnace, 5-woodod 
acres. Possblo contract. No 
aponls. (847) 244-9492. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For" Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



HOT REAL ESTATE 




MES 



WAITING FOR YOU 




burban 




Curtice 

AFFORDABLE FAMILY 
LIVING 

wiili all Uic Irfmmlrifp. 4 bdrmi, 2- 
1/2 lijihs, (am. rm. wllh FT - opcni 
In klldi, A ejllng area, Wailvxl oak 
cabfndiy, muL lie., Irgc comer lot, 
(<-nc«l yard. 

$I?X9QQ 



Gumcc 

HEATHERRIDGE 

$101,900 

Town homo - 2-3 bdrms, 2 full 
bths, gas heal, just few steps 
from golf course. Enjoy IIR 
amenities - golf, tennis, 24 hr, 
soc,, pools. 



Undcnhurst 

BETTER THAN 

NEW 

2 bdrm, 2-1/2 bth TH. features 
oak cabs., cath ceil,, FP, mast, 
suite, 2 car gar. 

SI 29,900 ' 



Libertyville 

HUGE FAMILY HOME 

4 bdrm, 2-1/2 lulhs, over 2100 si. 

beautiful family home In well estab- 

Ittlted neighborhood. Hardwood fin, 

FP, Florida-type room. Well-main- 

Ulrtcd. Just move In, 

$229,900 



Graydakc 

TOWNHOME 

Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2-1/2 bth that 
features marble FP, 2 story foyer, 
fin. lower level, cen. air, deck 
Less than 2 yr. old. Sec It now. 
$131,499 



Cray slake 

EXEC RENTAL 

Lease Purchase Possible 

Over 4650 s.f. Ultra master sta, 

fantastic kltch, huge liv. rm., 

fam. rm., din, rm. Arbor Vista, 

$3800/mo. 



Call Jayne Jones or Jan White (847) 367-8686 Ex. 213 or 240 

RF^MpX Suburban 

1344 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville, Illinois 



BUILDER CLOSING OUT 
HOUSES AT REDUCED 
PRICESI Roady for your fam- 
ily. AD havo energy olllclonl 
thormopano windows, 2x6 
wails (R-20). R-38 ceilings. 
FINANCING AVAILABLE, 
contract sale, rent/option pos- 
sblo on some. 

'CRYSTAL LAKE - Brlck- 
Codar 2800sq.lt„ 4-bodroom 
ranch, 3.5 car garago. 
$299,900. Lot's lalk.l 
•McHENRY3-bodroom 
ranch, 2-bath, 2-car garage, 
vaultod co Dings. $144,900. 
•LOTS 1 acre lot In Windy 
Prarlo Acres, $45,000. Mc- 
Cullom Lake, double lot, 
$29 900 

CALL BUILDER DIRECT 
AND SAVE ON ABOVE 
HOUSES, (847) 52&-S7S5. 

WE BUY HOUSES, any 

slzo, any condition. Fast close. 
(7081438-0901. 



Want To Sett 
Your Vehicle Fast? 

Call Lisa In Classified 

(847) 223-8161 

Ext. 140 

*5L 



Op EN 




■ - 



Open House 

Fiscter Estates, IngleskJe Open House 

Sat , March 2-11 am to 2 pm 

33953 H, Fischer Drive 1279.900 

Hosted by Kelly McKrywy 

Century 21 Best Professonals 

(34 7) 548-5000 

33838 N. Christa {289,900 

Hosted by Kim Schnoor 

Ra/Max Advantage Realty (847)395-3000 

Dl* Taka Rib. 12 north to flta 134. turn 

light (easg, go to Nipperslnk, turn righ 1 

{south), go to Brodenburg, turn right (west) 

to Fact*/, turn left (south) to house rumba 

Go back b N pperv. k, turn right one Nock 

to Dobree, turn right r>csQ to Christa, turn 

left to house number. Wath tor signs. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 27934 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Banc One Mortgage Corporation, 

.■.Plaintiff. Case No. 95 C 4314 

VS. . Judge MORAN 

Lincoln K, Skalla and Margaret A. Skalla, TCF' 
Bank and Tho Yarmouth Group.^nc. 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 27934 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
enterod In the above entitled cause on October 19. 1995 . 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
March 27, 1996 at the hour ol 9:00 a.m. at the front door of Lake 
County Court House, Waukogan, Illinois, sell to the highest bid 
der for cash, the following described promises: 

1910 Fox Meadow Ct„ Gurnoe, IL 60031 

The Improvements on the property consist ol single family, 
wood frame, two story dwelling with an attached garage. 

Sate Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, cortilied funds. No relunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $214,430.36. 

Upon tho sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 30 North LaSallo, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sates 
Officer is qoJ required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In thts Notice. 




House 



■j 



OPEN HOUSE 

(Sunday lpm-4pm 

(BY OWNED) 




Looking for a great starter or retirement horacl 

Tills three bedroom, quality-built, country charmer In Grsyslakc Is in 
more-lii condition. This home la In a. super location, dose .to downtown, 
Janes Island and acruM from Woodvlrw Elementary School Many ameni- 
ties are Included: Fcnccd-ln yard, 2-1/2 car garage, luge patio, neutral 
colors, and mature trees. All major appliances are Included. 8124,000. 
Directions: Route 120 to Ukc Street, north In Harvey, west to Alleghany. 

349 NortJi Alleghany - Crnyslakc, Illinois 

(847) 223-4490 



3555 and 3575 Grand Avenue, Gurnee, Illinois PUB- 
LIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment 
entered on February 7, 1996 In the Circuit Court of Ihe 19th 
Judicial Circuit. Lake County, Illinois, In the matter of First 
Midwest Bank, NA vs. Walton Food Mart, Inc., et al, 9S CH 
110, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation ((31 2) 444-1122) 
will on Friday, March 8, 1996, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. in the 
office ol Intercounty Title Company of Illinois at 400 Peterson 
Road, Libertyville, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, 
the aforesaid mortgaged real estate which Is Improved with 
a one and part two-story approximately 107.700 square loot 
retail store building with offices on the second level. The first 
level consists ol 94,100 square leet of space - the second 
level 13,600 square feet. 356 parking spaces are included In 
the improvements. 

The sale will also include articles ol personal property 
Identified In Exhibit 2 to that certain Judgment entered in the 
above entitled cause on February 7, 1996. 
Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance due on the 
next business day by certified funds, no refunds. 

The property may be open for Inspection by arrange- 
ment with Mr. Michael Welnlnger at (312) 807-3800. 

For Information call Mr. Michael Welnlnger at Plaintiff's 
Attorney, Katz Randall & Weinberg, 333 West Wacker Drive, 
Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 807-3800. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 27923 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Norwest Mortgage, Inc., 

Plaintiff, • Case No. 95 C 3629 

VS. Judge Norgle 

Thomas R. Donnelly, Lexington in the Park 
Condominium Association 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR RLE NO. 27923 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on Novembers. 1995 . 

I. Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on April 
2. 1996 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at the front door of Lake County 
Court House, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: 

1127 Auburn Lane, Buffalo Grove, IL 60090 
The Improvements on the property consist ol fourplex, wood 
frame, two story dwelling with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds, No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
Tho property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The judgment amount was $1 40,682.55. 
Upon Ihe sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4764 Irom 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sates 
Officer is nol required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 





Ft 


E 


/v* I h»J 


O E R - . . 


• 


THE 


NEW ARE'A 


CODE FOR 


OUR 








AREA IS (847) 





(847) 680-3450 



^ 




711 N. Milwaukee* 
Libertyville, IL 600A3 



JUST REDUCED! 

Spectacular, approx. 4403 sq. ft. of quality German craftsmanship. This 
homo (natures 4-5 BR, 3 1/2 baths, massive LR wrcathodra! ceiling. 
Irnaressrvo ontranco (oyer wrftiardwood floor, huoa FR wfFP & sep. Den, 
lull Imished walk-out lower level Wm-Ujw possible, garage large enough 
to house 5 cars & is placed on a gorgeous 1.75 aero lotl •319,900 

A DREAM COME TRUE 

This stunning 2 story features a lighl bright & spacious floor plan w/3 
bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, finished boaoment, lormal living & dining rooms, 
lamly room w/firepiaco, large eat-in kitchen, recreation room & shows 
t:ke a model. Come see the value. •184,000 

JUST REDUCED! 

This beautiful 2 1/2 year oW 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath homn features for- 
mal living room, dining room, family room, large kitchen w/oak cabinets 
& separate eat-in area & island, 1st Ikwr laundry, and is located on a 
beautiful street In a newer subdivision. $134,999 



] 



NOTICE TO AREA 
HOMEOWNERS 



THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 

HAS SET ASIDE UP TO $25,000 

FOR EACH QUALIFIED 

HOMEOWNER IN THIS AREA! 

THIS MONEY IS AVAILABLE 

TO QUALIFIED HOMEOWNERS 

FOR SIDING, VINYL 

REPLACEMENT WINDOWS 

AND REMODELING. YOUR 

HOME DOES NOT HAVE 

TO BE PAID FOR IN 

ORDER TO QUALIFY. 

HURRY AND CALL 

PIONEER BUILDING 

SUPPLY, INC. 

708-263-6322 

• NO EQUITY PAYMENTS REQUIRED • SMALL MONTHLY 
PAYMENT* NO DOWN PAYMENT REQUIRED • FHA INSURED 

• FHA TITLE FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR ALL OF THE ABOVE 

MENTIONED WORK. THIS IS NOT A GRANT. 
BAD CREDIT AND BANKRUPTCY CAN ALSO QUALIFY. 



CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY TO: 

PIONEER BUILDING SUPPLY INC. 

3567 GRAND AVE., SUITE 31 6B 

GURNEE, IL 60031 

708-263-6322 

Name 



Address. 
City 



State Zip. 



Phone 



504 



Homes For Rent 



504 



Homes For Rent 



EDWARDS SUBDIVISION 
3-BEDROOMS, 2-balhs, 

Grayslake Schools, 2-1/2 car 
garago, A/C. lake rights, 
fenced yard. Immaculate con- 
dition. 5950/rnonlh plus socurt- 
ty and utllltlos. No pots. Rolor- 
oncos required, (847) 
546-7123. 



LAKE VILLA DUPLEX 2- 
Dedroom. 1-balh, attached 1- 
car garage, fireplace, full 
basement, largo fenced-in 
yard with dock, appliances In- 
cluded, no pots. Pay own utlll- 
tlos. 5000/morrlh plus security 
dopostl. Available May Is!. 
(847) 356-7253. 



504 



Homes For Rent 



FOX LAKE TWO BED- 
ROOM HOME No pets. Ex- 
coHont condllon. S650/month 
plus unities. (847) 587-2622 
ask for Ann. 

WAUCONDA 3-HOOUS 
PLUS loll, 1-bedroom, In- 
town, quiet, 4-flat, parking, 
laundry. S550/month plus se- 
curity. Available 3/15. (647) 
265-0212 

WAUKEGAN 1-BEDROOM 
SINGLE famfly home, Victor- 
ian setting, off street parking. 
Available now. (708) 
336-0144. 



GRAYSLAKE 
ROOM HOUSE. 
(847)223-5101. 



1-BED- 
No pets. 



HALF MONTH FREE 
RENT. 2-bedroom cottage on 
PettRe Lake. 3550/morth plus 
security deposit and referenc- 
es. No dogs. (847) 395-5045. 



510 



Home Builders 



NEW HOMES 

First time home buyers 

NO MONEY DOWNIII 

For Information, call 

Bayshor© Builders 

(847) 473-5505 



514 



Coodo/Town Homes 



CRYSTAL LAKE 2YR new, 
2-bedroom, 2-balh townhome 
for rent, fireplace, eat-ki ktch- 
on. garage. $850/month. 
(708)885-3654. 

GREAT LOCATION, GUR- 
NEE TOWNHOME, 3-bed- 
rooms, 1.5 bathrooms, 2-car 
garago, C/A. large yard, buQt 
in 1992, all appliances Induct- 
ed. $115,000. Call Dave (847) 
855-8109. 

LAKE VILLA TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, 2-story, basement. 
Backs to woods, private, se- 
curity fence, across from Fox 
Lake with rights. $105,000. 
(847)973-1118. 

TOWNHOME 3-BED- 

ROOMS, 1-1/2 baths, ap- 
pliances, garage, 3% FHA 
loan. Asking $84,900. By own- 
er. (847) 740-2452. 



ATTENTION 
RENTERS: 

GetYomMoneft Worth! 

SO MUCH FOR SO LITTLE 

IN VERNON HILLS 

2 Bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, patio, 

watklng/blke trails, lake, pool, tow 

payments. & big room sizes. 

Groat Buy! 

Call Greg or 
BUI Anders on at 

Century 21 

Market Place, Ltd. 

for nor detail*! 
(847) 949-7100 E.1.3C art! 



518 



Mobile Homes 



MUNDELEIN 1992 1-BED- 
ROOM Mobile Homo, nowty 
remodeled. Includes all ap- 
pliances and washer, dryer, 
dishwasher. A/C unit and out- 
door shed.. $22,000/bost. 
(847) 949-8083 leave mes- 
sage. 



— 



, ■(■ l_ 




CLASSIFIED UkclANd Newspapers MARch 1, 1996 



* 



518 



Mobile Homes 



520 



Apulmcnls For Rail 



J 



WAUCONDA, 1-bodroom 
aparlmonl, newly decorated, 
stove, rolrlgorator, hoat and 
hot water Included. 
$515/rnonlh, loase/socurtty 
deposit. No pots. Avattablo Im- 
mediately. (847)433-0891. 

BRAND NEW LARGE 2- 
bodroom duplex for rent, wtlh 
attached garage fn Zion. Avail- 
able 3715, $795/month, plus 
security deposit. Call a I lor 
3pm. (B47) 662-8209. 

EFFICIENCY APART- 

MENT, VACATION VIL- 
LAGE, large llvfngroom, full 
bath with T & S, tuff/ oqulppod 
kitchen with breakfast bar, 
A/C. Fonced property has full 
lime galo and grounds securi- 
ty. Sony no pots. $420/month 
plus utilities. Security dopostt 
required. (708) 964-0402. 

FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM, 
C/A, beach, water rights. Avail- 
able now. Seoo/month. (312) 
258-0044 days. 

IMPERIAL TOWER & 
IMPERIAL MANOR 
QUIET BUILDINGS 
LARGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

LARGE CLOSETS 

PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (847) 244-9222. 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Largo 1+2- 
bodroom apartments. Lake Vil- 
la. S575 and $700/month. 
Heat water, air Included. 
(647)356-5474. 

ZION 1-BEDROOM, FREE 
hoat, water, parking. Utlllllos 
negotiable. Coin laundry. 
(847) 587-6360. 

TWO BEDROOM, TOP 
IgvoI 3rd. floor, groal balcony 
view, lulty equipped, modem, 
quiet, with picnic aroa and 
grills. Only $630/month. Avail- 
able April 1 . Call Green Valley 
Apis., Park City (847) 623- 
3393 ask lor apt, 4255-304. 

UNION GROVE MANAG- 
ERS Fall Special! 1/2 month 
rent troo. Studio, 1 & 2 bed- 
room apartments. Prices 
begin at $395/monlh. Security 
deposit same as one months 
rent. Mlnl-bllnds, celling lans, 
appliances and gas heat In- 
cluded. Call today lor an ap- 
pointment! Countryside Apart- 
ments (414) 878-9755. 

LIBERTYVILLE, LARGE 2- 
BEDROOM apartment, 1- 
balh, llvlngroom, soporale dl- 
nlngroom, with oat-ln kitchen, 
walk-In closets, walking dis- 
tance to schools and public 
transportation. Garage Includ- 
ed. $700/month plus security 
.deposit. No pets. (047) 
362-0595 days, (847) 367- 
6223 alter 6pm. 

MUNDELEIN 1 MILE South 
of Motorola on Rt. 83. 2-bed- 
rooms, 2nd floor, laundry facul- 
ties, heat/water Included, 
$575/month. Lease. NjLflflifl. 
Np wtarbads. (847) 
32B—6674. 

BaaaaaaaaBaaaB' 

3 Psst. ..... I 

B Want to save money on your Hj 
H rentrrr We have a studio 1 & g 



a 

a 
a 
a 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



2 bedroom apartments that 

are really nice. Located in a 

great area and after you pay 

the rent, you have money 

leftll All this in a 3 year old 

building!! Military and 

section 6 welcome. Short 

term leases available. Don't 

wait, this Is the best kept 
rental secret in the area and 
a the word is outll Call todayl 
g (847)746-2226 



a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a- 

a 

a 

a 

a 

B' 

a 
a 



■aauaaaataaaaaB 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartments For Rcnl 



Business Property 
For Rent 



MOBILE HOME 
14FT.X70FT., 3-bodrooms, 
flroplaco, A/C. toncod yard, 
huge dock. Konosha (414) 
697-0005. ' 

MODULAHS *DOU- 
BLEW1DES *SIN- 
GLEWIDES TWO STORY 
MODULAR ON DISPLAYI 
FOUNDATIONS 'BASE- 
MENTS 'GARAGES *WELLS 
•SEPTIC. WE DO IT ALU 
FREE STATEWIDE DELIV- 
ERY/SET. RILEY MANUFAC- 
TURED HOMES 1-800-790- 
1541. 

WAUCONDA ADULT COM- 
MUNITY HARMONY VIL- 
LAGE 5 Homos ready to 
move In, $35,900 to $56,000, 
Most 2-bodrooms, 2-baths, 
soma garages, most carports. 
Open 6 days a wook. (708) 
526-5000. 



INTERPRETER AVAILABLE /A^/^T/f 

Japanese, French, Russian, (j\filU* W_ 

German & Spanish by Appt. A 

NOW OPEN EVENINGSI 

MON., TUES. & WED. 
BY APPOINTMENT 




538 



xxxzxmxxxxxxxxxxxi 

I FOR RENTb I 

S 300 sq. foot office will wllb J 
central A.C., private balh, 



A R T M 



Reduced from $925 to $850 



$300 Security Deposit 
w/Approved Credit 




Free Baste Cable 

Mini Blinds & Verticals Included 

Bay Windowed Kitchen 

Microwave Ovens 

Gas Heal & Gas Cootdng 

Central Air 

847-356-1550/5010 
LINDENHURST 

5-1/2 miles West of 1-94 




Water's Edge 
Apartments 



530 



Rooms For Rcnl 



• FREE Gas Heat, Cooking & Water 

• Spaciously Designed Apartments 

• Fully Equipped Picture Window Kitchens 

250 S. Rte. 59 - Fox Lake 

(847)587-6888 W 



FOX RIVER VALLEY GAR- 
DENS stooping room lor rent, 
$270/monlh. Wtchen privileg- 
es, troo cablo. No smoking 
ploaso. 35 Eastwood Ave. 
(70fl) 639*8979. 



533 



Buildings 






ANITA TERRACE 
APARTMENTS 

SHORT TERM BATES AVAIL. 
$620 MO. + SEC. DER 

1ST MO. FREE BENT* 

•(QUALIFIED APPLICANTS 12 MO. LEASE) 

SENIOR CITIZEN INCENTIVES 

CALL (847) 838-0655 

MINUTES TO /-W, ROUTES 45, 83, AND 59. TtiAIN STATION 
(NEXT SWUNG) WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE. 



1 SHOT IUUMKI Mil nu 

118x21,33*45,80x150. 
INEW NEVER ERECTED, PRE- 
JFAB KITS. DESIGNED FOR 1 
IOR 2 OARAGE DOORS. CAN 
[ERECT WITHOUT CONCRETE 
| FLOOR. 

JIM (847) 223-1012 




Business Property 
For Sale 



GRAYSLAKE HOUSE 

ZONED commercial -CBA, 
50x130 lot, 2.story, 3-bod- 
room. Contor Stroot 
$140,000. Hurryl (847) 
223-1873. 



PRINTING 



ORLANDO 

Wintor Park, FL slnco 1967, 

Complelo Print Shop, 

HoWloburg. AB Dick, 

Thermo, letler press, bindery. 

typo set. etc. S67K. 

(407) 644-0S40 



i 



llnglosido 

**300, 

Socurity Deposit 



oo 



on 



>0ne & Two Bedrooms < 

•Spacious 
•Private Balconies 
•Short term leases avail. 

Lakeview 
[Apartments! 

.(847)587-9277 

"quaMed applicants, I yr teaso | 



WESTW1ND 

VILLAGE 

APARTMEOTS 

2200 Lewis Ave, Zlon 
1 & 2 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances - Custom Blinds 

On-site Manager. No Pets. 

Starling $495/mo. 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(708) 746-1420 

or Bear Property 

Management 

(414) 697-9616 



IMPERIAL TOWER 
& IMPERIAL MANOR 

Quiet Buildings 

Large Spacious Apartments 

Air Conditioning 

Private Balconies 

Large Closets 

Privacy Walls 

Convenient Laundry Facilities 

CALL 

(847) 244-9222 



FLORIDA 
FOR EARLY RETIREE 

Rotir© with Income 
For Sale By Owner. 

Convenience Store on 3* ac, 

Gull Coast, store + 3 other 

buiktings & trailer park, S376K, 

(904) 578-271 8 Days: 
after B.tS pm. (904) 578-241 5 



MICHIGAN 

BY OWNER 

Own Your Own Business. 

Complete asphalt paving 

equip. Owner retiring. S125K. 

(31 7) 689-3814 Days. 

(317) 433-2074 Eves. 



iim i nmimummm t ti 



STATIONSIDE 
VILLAGE 

5215 11TI1 AVENUE 
KENOSHA, WI 

Luxurious Living 

Apartments & Town houses 

2 Bedrooms - 2 Baths 

Mini Blinds 

Appliances 

Garages Available 

Elevators 

No Pets 

| Call (414) 656-1010 ; 
tinmmm it tmmmm 



PRIME MISSISSIPPI 

Recreation & Tourism Loc. 
Exc. local draw. Complete inl/ext 

remodeling. Dining, banquet, 

lounge, boat docks, deck & patio. 

Was S425K. Now S325K. Inc. real 

estate, all new equip. Must see 

. Owner ready to retire. 

(608) 248-2647 



1 






TOWING 
SERVICE 

in sunny Phoenix, AZ 
Well established commercial 
accounts, comes complete with 
7 trucks & 3 acs. All or part. . 

(602) 272-1700 



DEEP LAKE 
HERMITAGE 

SPACIOUS 1 
BEDROOM SUITES 

> • Free gas heat, 
cooking & water 

• Air Conditioner In 
each unit 

• Wall-to-wall carpeting 

• Ample closet space 

• Appliances Included 

• Tennis & 
Basketball Courts 

• Laundry facilities 
in building 

*545 ra 

149 N. Milwaukee 
. Lake Villa, IL 
(847) 356-2002 



SPECIAL 
3 BEDROOM 

Apartment Available Now, 

Appliances, Blinds. 

$70S/month. 

HEAT 
INCLUDED 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(847) 746-1420 

No Pen Please!! 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 

WANTED to stiaro 3-bod- 
room, 2-1/2 bath townhouso In 
Vomon Hills. Available Imme- 
diately. Was her/dry or. 
$450/month utilities included. 
(847) 549-8460. 



5 ample off street parkinR, In a 6 x 
I unit office hulldlng In Round X 

$ Lake, reasonable rent. J 

x (847) 546-0818 1 

XXIXXXXXIXXXXIXIXXX 



r^. 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



NEW HOME 
CONSTRUCTION 

New Iota available in 
Winlhrop Harbor and Zion. 
We offer a complete turnkey 
operation. Call Tank and 
Robbins Construction Co. at 
708-746-6201 



564 



ResorWacation 
Rentals 



GOT A CAMPGROUND 
MEMBERSHIP OR TIME- 
SHARE? Wo'H take tt! Ameri- 
cans largest resale clearing- 
house. Call Resort Sales Int. 1- 
800-423-5967 (24 hours). 



568 



OutOfAnaPrDpcrt) 



1 



SOUTHERN 
WISCONSIN 

*I3 acres in Vernon, 
Waukesha County. Large 
barn with 4 stalls, run in res- 
idential zoning. Favorable 
perk test. 1-43 exposure. 

$90's 
• 10 acre horse facility. Sharp 
3 year old contemporary 
house. Fenced pasture, 10 
stall barn. 30 minutes west 
of Milwaukee. 

$325,000 

HONEYAGER 
REALTORS 

(414)702-5775 



COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
32X60, I2ft.x14ft. overhead 
door, high ceilings, otl Rt. 12. 
5800/month, $400/month (or 
hall. (847) 537-7008. 

GRAYSLAKE PRIME 
DOWNTOWN store front and 
or office, 2300sq.ft. Will dtvldo. 
(647) 223-5353. 

RETAIL SPACE FOR 
QUALITY ANTIQUE FUR- 
NITURE DEALER In Historic 
Richmond Shop. (615) 
678-3031. 

WAUCONDA 

Restored 700sq.fl. office or 
retail storefront 
on Main Street. 

fB47) 526-3310. 



ILLINOIS 

Bel woo n Danville & Champaign on 
1-74. 43 acres horse larm, 40 box 
stalls, 3BR houso, lots el extras. 
52 50,000 , 

Jim aingu Seal Estate 

<2lV> 469-2SOO 



ILLINOIS - Weekend retreat 

downstate, 2 1/2 hra. from Chgo, 7 

beaut 15-20 ac., wooded parcels, 

all w/stocked pvt ponds, some 

w/addt'l lake frontage. Ideal for 

resld'l or recreational use. Adjoins 

State Park. Low $30's - %W*. By 

Owner, 21 7-446-8733 for appt 



ILLINOIS, INDIANA Get away 
Worn the cityl Rolocalol Ro- 
Investt Farms available. 2000 
acres & down, call ROSEN- 
BOOM REALTY, Richard F. 
Hansen, Broker. ' Trades 
Welcome. 815-933-9773 or 815- 
954-4558 for dotal Is. 



568 



OulOfArcaPrDpcrt) 



574 



Ileal Estate Wan lol 



LOTS BY OWNERI 5,9% 
Land Contract. No Closing 
Costs! No Points I 1 to 4.5 acr- 
os, heavily woodod, Rolling or 
troe-IInod. Deedod path rights 
to Fox River In Burlington. 
$29,900 to $67,900. Plat, 
(414)421-8582. 



MONTANA, BUTTE 

Tired ot Iho city? Come to the 
mountains. Doautilul codnr a 
slono homo nr G0O0 s.t., 4 BR, 3- 
1/2 BTH, bar, ofc. workout rm„ 
sleam balh, raequctball ct.. loc. on 
beautiful landscnpod dbl lot, 
across street fr golf course Luxury 
living In clean air. S375K. by 
Owner. 

40C/4 04-4 BOO for details. 



TENNESSEE 

037 secluded nc. (groat corp/tndlv. 
retreat), miles of river tronlago. 
lish, wildlife abundant. BOO no. 
market limer, 3 million *!• bd. ft. of 
marketable timer. One of naturo's 
best. Owner lorms. S850K. 

(615)243-2367 






FLORIDA KEYS 

Now tropical ocnlrnt. 1.5 
ac. ostato. 4BR/41/2 BA, 
pool, olovator, 400' plor. 
Marty • 

(305) 852-5285/ 
(305) 451-2002 



MICHIGAN 

Harbor Springs - By Owner, 
Beautiful custom built country 
home on BO acros, 3BR, 2 1/2 
BTH, Ira. liv/din. area, big tins- 
plaoo, S520K. 

(616) 526-6018 cm 
FAX (616) 526-9718 



A GREAT ESCAPE, canoe- 
ing, kayaking, trout fishing, 
and nature watching await you 
on this class 1 trout river. 
Bulldablo Watorlront lots. 
Starting at $19,950. 1-800- 
335-2420 Four Seasons Roal- 
ty Central WI. 

NORTHERN WI: NEWI 

Fully finished, cabin. 2.5 ac. 
w/access to forest, Westom 
oxposed-onty $146,900. Ml- 
NOCQUA-9ac. w/access to 10 
lake chain. Must see $12,950. 
BOULDER JCT.-27 ac w/ovor 
630* ol (rig. On privalo lake, 
PARK FALLS-3.5 ac. on wil- 
derness llowage. Heavily 
woodod 157" ol trig. $32,950. 
800-54B-6933 FOUR SEA- 
SONS REALTY . 

ATTN LAKE LOVERS! Freo 

color brochure and land list ot 
gorgoous lakolront & view 
properties on hugo lake mar 
Knoxvlllo, Tonnossoe & 
Smokoy Mtns. Mild climate. - 
Low taxes. Excellent financing. 
Buy direct from dovolopor and 
save thousands. Prices from 
$7,900 to $69,900. Call Mar- 
bio Blult 800-376-0802, oxt. 
7066. File #0-07249-48. 

CHETEK, WISCONSON 

FURNISHED or unlurnished 
lakolront home lor salo. 3-bod- 
rooms, lull basement, com- 
pletely remodeled, everything 
now, electric, gas, C/A, etc., 2- 
■1/2 car garage, boat houso, 
with pontoon boat, trailer and 
boat Hit, hugo lot. Asking 
$1 1 5,0 00. C708)39&-4 641. 



ARKANSAS - HUNTER'S DREASL 

Beautiful Williamsburg 

Colonial home with 45+ 

acres. Deer, turkey abound. 

$225,000. By Owner. Call 

501-251-3651 for details. 



WISCONSIN 

Get Away from the the Cityl Esupe 

to Wisconsin- 14 ac. parcel, woods, 

picture, bam. 7 yr. old 1800 sq. IL 

log borne, S190K. 

Loll Kitler, MinbaU Realty 

(608) 568-3254 



CENTRAL MINNESOTA - 

592 ACRE GRAIN (Com, 

Soy Bean), BEEF or DAIRY 

FARM. Pope County. 

$41 5,000. Call Bill. The 

Harrison Co.. 1-800-927- 

151 8 for details. 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Plymouth 

Potential Bed & Breakfast on # 1 
fairway, 3 ac. Camellia garden, 
near ocean, small historic town, 
low taxes. 

Cafl Cor ky. BKU COMMftY, 

>-A0O-S49-34S« 

tar ittdhfoin. 



ILUMOIS-3S acs. In Ogle 
County, noxt to Nachusa 
Pralrlolands. treos, crop 
land & smalt creek running 
thru. $190,000. 4 bodroom 
homo, Inground pool, spa & 
sevoral outbkJgs. 5150,000. 
By owner. B 15-456-2240 



MINNESOTA 

430 Acre Soy Bean Farm. Stems 

good hav? soil, newer house, 4 

bins, pole barn, other small bIJgs. 

SI 000 per ad. FIRM I By Owner. 

Call (612) 243-4213 

tor intoidetaili 



IOWA 

Gel Away from the Problems of the 
BIG CITYI Farms, Farms, Farms. 
Iowa side of the Mississippi Call 
Poller Realty, 

1-800-798-5340 

For inloVdoloib. 



SPORTS BAR & GRILL 

Nr. Eau Claire, WI (cent.) 
Active businoss nr. UW 
Campus. 1 0K st. loases 

1.000H. to pizza delivery 
bus. Todd 11-6 M-F 

(715) 341-1199 



DUNNELUDN, N. CENT. FL. 

Rainbow Springs Golf 

& Country Club 

Lovely 4BR all brick ranch hra, 

1/2 ac., many special features, by 

Owner. $169,900 no comm. All 

reasonable offers considered. 

(352) 465-0867 



PASADENA, FL 
YACHT & GOLF 

Spac. upper It, 3BR/2BA decora- 
tor upgrades, neul. tie & crpel'g. 
70' bole. Hurr. shutters, sensation 
ol wtrvw, gar., 24hr sec. 
■ $224 K. Owner 

(813) 781-7828 




LAND A BUILDING LOTS 
WANTED: Dbvolopor/Bulldor 
wants to buy building lots and 
acroago that (a aultablo for 
subdividing. Cash paid, quick 
closings, land contracts and 
subrogaltona OK It you want 1o 
spread out capital gains. Rat- 
land Dovotopmorrt Corp., Box 
08. Urbana, Illinois G1B01. 



708 



Saowmobilcs/ATVs 



SNOWMOBILES SKI- 

DOOS, 1985 Mach 1 and 
1090 Safari, with trailer, 
KJ.OOG/bosL Must sell. (4141 
654-0852. 



710 



Boal/Motors/Etc 



1 



BOAT 2SFT. 18SS REGAL 
250 XL, 260 MerCrulser, 
pump-out head, shlp-to- 
shora, now camper top, depth 
and fish tinder, E-Z Loador 
trallor. 285 hours, $12,500. 
(815) 385-0508, 

FOURTEEN FOOT BOAT 
and trallor with swivel seat 
$800. (847) 546-5991. 

SLIPS AVAILABLE ON 
FOX LAKE, with 4-way safe- 
ty linos or shore stations. (847) 
356-2747. 



PONTOON BOATS 

30 NEW IN STOCK 
IN DOOR SHOWROOM 

HUSTLER SPORT 

CENTER, INC. 

(815) 385-4056 



HEWITT BOAT DOCKS 



HOLL-IN & FREE STANDrNr. 



HEWITT ALUMINUM BOATUFTO 



600 TO 8000 LB. 



IN DOOR SHOW ROOM 



HUSTLER SPORT CENTER. INC. 



(816) 385-4848 




1990 Baytlnor Cnprt 

22' Cuddy Cabin, 260 
h.p. V-8 Chevy Merc. 

Stern-drive, 

low hrs., Very Clean! 

$11,500 

Firm 

Serious Inq. only! 

414-552-2699 nights 

414-947-9397 Days 

Jim. K 



19B9 HONDA ACCORD 
LX, 4 -door, all numbers 
match, Illinois car. High perfor- 
mance factory four cylinder, 
booted up Hondamalic Trans- 
mission. Alt comfort options. 
B4K track miles. Runs 
19.2/74mph. Cloan and quick. 
Must sell as my neighbors are 
scared. $7,750. (847) 548- 
1115. 

1991 HONDA CRX HF 5- 
spoed, rod with black interior, 
now alternator, brakes and 
tiros. $7,000/bost. (815) 
385-8569. 

CHEVROLET CELEBRITY 
EUROSPORT 1987, good 
condition, most power options, 
$4,000A)OSi. (S47) 548-1116. 

CHEVROLET MONTE 

CARLO 1986 with V8 engine, 
automatic transmission. 

$1,400/bQSt. (414) 694-7982. 

CHEVY 1989 CAPRICE 
CLASSIC BROUGHAM, 

trailer hitch, great condition, 
72K. $6,900. (847) 746-8593. 

DUE TO ILLNESS, must 
sell 1992 Cadillac doVille, 
clean, oxcellent condition. 
$17,500. 1994 Chevy S-10 
pickup, low mileage, excellent 
condition, $11,500. (414) 
843-3751. 

HONDA ACCORD LX 
1989, 4-doer. AT w/console, 
powor steering, power wind- 
ows, A/C, powor brakes, 
AM/FM cassette Newer 
brakes, Aquatreds. exhaust 
and tuno-up. 84K easy com- 
muter miles. Excellent Interior 
and exterior. Totally depend- 
able and exceptionally clean. 
$7,750, Call (647) 548-1115. 

HONDA ACCORD EX 1995, 
automatic, sunroof, loaded, 
7,000 miles, black. 
$18,400/best. (708) 298-7432. 

MONTE CARLO SS 1984, 
summer car, $4,750. Suzuki 
"■f985' 12cc, '11,000 miles, 
$3,500. (414) 843-4527. ' 



} 



_** t **M&4 i .i~ .n.C.w.-, ,-. i.^ - ----- _ 




MAitch 1, 1996 UkdAw! Newspapers CLASSIFIED 



Cars for Sale 



814 



Service & Paris 



824 



Vans 



OM 



Four Whcd Drive 
Jeeps 



834 



Tnicks/Trallers 



838 



Heavy Equipment 



844 



Motorcycles 



19BS MERCEDES BENZ 

3O0D TURBO 
Supor doan, showroom 
indltlon. Garago kopt. Sltvor 
h black Interior. A/C, powor 
lunrool.powor everything. 
$9,900rt»st. 
(047)567-4119. 

1366 OLDS 98 
uo, cloan body, runs won. 

No rust. Now tiros, 
stoat at $800. Must see. 
Call (B47) 3S6-6856. 



CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

bodloa. Factory now, guar- 
anteed from $1,300. Doors 
Irom $89.00, fenders from 
$50.00, bods Irom $800, bod- 
llnors $109.00. BUMPERS, 
GRILLS, REPAIR PANELS, 
PAINTS, ABRASIVES, WIND- 
SHIELDS, RADIATORS. DoBv- 
ory. Mark's 217-824-6184. 



DODGE GRAND CARA- 
VAN 1988, crufso, AM/FM 
cassotto, power stoorlng, lilt, 
loaded. Excellent condition. 
$5,000. (708) 587-8402. 




FORD 1988 RANGER XLT 
Super Cab with cap, 4-cytin- 
dor, 5-spood, air, 103K. 
$3,500ft O8t. (847) 304-7978. 

FORD EXPLORER 1991, 
rod, 2-door, wife's car, garage 
kopt, great condition, 
512,000/bost, (815) 

360-9039. 



REMINDER 



THE NEW AREA CODE FOR OUR AREA IS (84Z) 



1986 GMC 1/2 TON PICK- 
UP TRUCK shortbed, step 
side, big e-cyllndor with 4- 
spood. Radial tires, CB, 
AM/FM casotte. Camper top. 
Runs excellent. Some rust. 
Asklng$2,300. Call (847) 740- 
4978 altor 6pm. 

FORD RANGER PICKUP 
TRUCK 1987, 4-cyllndor, 5- 
speed, air, very good condi- 
tion, 64,000 miles. $3,000. 
(847) 566-0059, (647) 566- 
0850. 



.1984 LT 9000 Tandem Axle 
Dump, 350 Cummins, 13- 
speed transmission, equipped 
wrth 10ft. Western hydrotum 
plow. Asking $23,000. (414) 
652-8477. 

Check This 

Section 
Each Week! 



SAMSON STAGGERD 

DUELS for H-D late model 
bagger and quick silver flat 
slide cart), spigot type, $250 
takes both. Call Mlko for de- 
tails (847) 356-3747 Biter 
5pm. 

SUZUKI 1994 K AT ANA 
750, black with purpte whoota, 
only 900 mites. Don! wait urtU 
spring. Only $4,995.- (414) 
658-1025 aflor4pm. 



< it :? 



STROH'S/LAKE COUNTY 
BOWLING ASSOCIATION 



v> 



i ( .'M 



WESTWIND VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave, Zion 
1 & 2 BEDROOMS • FREE HEAT 

[Appliances - Custom Blinds • On-site Manager • No Pets 

Starting from $495/mo. 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(847) 746-1420 

or Bear Property Management 

(414) 697-9616 




of Luck, Bowlers! 



gfega % Slif 



•FREE 
Admission 



«i>T» 




•FREE 

Parking 

ion-Track Wfftet ) 

11106 Rt. 12 • Richmond, IL 

Located in Andre's Steakhouse 

OPEN 7 DAYS 815-678-6600 



h 



[GOOD LUCK BOWLERS 



Visit 



IWmi aiui>i tAms 



Bumper Bowling •Private Parties 

•leagues 

Brunswick Automatic Scores < 
: fi) Lottery • Snack Shop j^ \ 

§C(J3} 1547-49 Sheridan Road, North Chicago Q \h 

6890500 



|j? 



^/ 



Good Luck To % 

All The Bowlers In $ 

This Year's | 

Tournament! 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 






I (847) 223-8161 ^ 




LAKE COUNTY 

oir BOWLING ASSOCIATION 
67th Annual Tournament 

After the second weekend of the 67th Lake County 
Bowling Association, the top teams were as follows: 

1— Majik Millwork 3526 

2— Trash 3430 

3— Norbert Plating 3423 

4 — Patton's Screw Products 3404 

5 — Madison Ave. Restaurant 3367 

6— Halo-Ericsons Pro Shop 3359 

7— Polish Home 3349 

8— Lake Co. Press • 3349 

9— Point 3326 

10— Classic Chevrolet 3312 

Low score still in money 3284 



-DOUBLES & SINGLES EVENT 
Saturday, March 2 & Sunday, March 3 



SAT, MARCH 2 
1:00 PM . j 

JESSE SHERROD-JOHN WOODS : 
RALPH RANDOLPH-EDWARD SCOTT 
LOUIE RUBCH-STAN MACZALA 

NATE JOHNSON-MLT WARE 
GENE BRYANT-JAKE WALLACE 
LEO PRESLEY-HENRY PRESLEY 
JOHN McMILLAN-FREDSWAGERTY 
LEON LEE-WESLEY GREEN 
E. PAYNE JR-E. PAYNE SR, 
ERNEST GUINS-DANNY SANDERS 
SHAWN PAYNE-DONALD HALL 
GARY JAMES-JOE COLE 
JAMES WALKER-ROBERT THIRSTON 
E. HANDY JR.-N. BUCKINGHAM 
KENNETH ROBINSON- 
BILL KIAUPA-J1M RENNEKER 
DENNIS KIAUPA-C. TWENTYMAN 
WARD TAYLOR JR.-TOM SELGRAT 

ARIEL CRUZ-JOHN FREEMAN 

RONE PEREZ-CARLOS RIVERA JR. 

JOHN CASTANO-ENRIQUE CHAVEZ 

LONNIE HORTON-EDNA MARIE EVANS 

DAN FINK-CHUCK McNULEY 

MIKE MORRIS-BRIAN HAYES 

JIM QUALLS-GEORGE HARMON 

TONY PODYMA-STEVE PEDERSON 

ERC OLAYOS-JERRY KROCKE 

BOB EDGE-OENNIS DOSTALEK 

HAROLD DOSTALEK-KEITH LUNN 

NEIL HANSON-BOB MOORE 

SAT- MARCH 2 
4:30 PM 

BOB SWITZWE-AL DIVOKY ; 

KEITH CELESTINE-BILL PFEIFER 

EMIL NATHANS-DON SCHMIDT 

MARK TANNER-NEAL TANNER 

TODD VERENSKI-PETE VANCA 

BOB RYAN-GARY DAVIDSON 

MIKE WAGONER-RICH WELAND 

BILL AMOUR-WAYNE LUOSA 

KEN ZICHOVICH-RANDY PEARCE 

JOHN WILKS-STEVE ARNDT 

JON WOLF-DARIO FRANK 

BRUCE SIEGAL-NEAL MESTLING 

MARK BURCHET-MARK LEVIN 

RAY FLANAGAN-WALLY HARRISON 

ELI PAGAN-ED WEAVER 

JIM SANCKEN-R1CK MclNNEY 

DON PLEASANT-G. VASZQUEZ 

MITCH GLICKMAN-DAVE SPARR 

BOB BAKER-JOHN HALL 

RUSS HUFFMAN-RAY HALL 

GIL JILPAS-ROLAND TEKAMPE 

MIKE GREG-NEIL MEYER 

BILL COOPRIDER-G. SCHNEIDER 

BOB FOX-ED HOLLISTER 

MARC BERZIN-BOB BERZIN 

MIKE RULEY-JERRY STEFFENS 

DALE TRUSKY-JIM McCARTHY 

JERRY POPE-MIKE REETZ 

■ KEVIN OLSEN-KEVIN FOLEY 

JEFF GRUTZ-LARRY BREWER 

SAT., MARCH 2 
8:00 PM 

JACK McELMURRY-DON WIGGINS 

NORM WAYER-EMILIO PEREZ 
PONCHO USHER-GERALD OLSEN 

DAVE GUTANTES-JAY SWANK 

STUART SWANK-BRYAN SWANK 

PAUL HINES-MICHAEL SAYRE 

LARRY EVITTS-KEN KERN SR. 

JOHN - JIM HUNTER 

RICH EVITTS SR.-RICH EVITTS JR. 

JEFF EVITTS-STEVE KELLERMAN 

HERB STEPP-NEIL EHLERS 

LARRY HUND-RICH MILLER 

BILL MITEFF-CHUCK SCHOLL 

MIKE HANNINEN-JIM ABELS 

TOM DOYLE-BOB DOYLE 

G. MAKSIMOVIC-SCOTT GEDMAN 

TIM JOLLY-DAN DIMITROFF 

MARV DAWSON-RON AXBERG 

FLIP FLAMINIO-TOM SMITH 

T. HUDSON JR.-GLENN HUDSON SR. 

AL BRACKEY-DAVE SLOAN 

JOHN EIFERT-BOB KING 

A. GUTIERREZ-CLARENCE JADRICH 

L LAMBRIGHT-CHARLIE STIGER 

EARL WILLIAMS-JIM STIGER 

DAVID MEDLEY-ELMORE NEAL 

R1C NABER-KEITH FARR 

EDDIE WISS-SCOTT MUSICK 

S. RAJKOVICH-JAMES McGREEVY 



SAT, MARCH 3 
1:00 PM 

JIM OGLE-RONALD LAURIDSEN 
WARD TAYLOR SR-D. DONNELLY 

JOE FARRIS-SCOTT RUSSELL 

KEITH MOELLER-KEN MOELLER 

CHUCK SWENKOSKE-BOB ROMANI 

ALPHONSO DAVIS-CHARLES BANKS 

TOM FARR-DAVE HANNA 

MIKE DUBES-RICK ANCLADE 

SHAWN CARLTON-CRAIG CARLTON 

MIKE THOMPSON-RICK CHEEK 

TIM WISHAU-TOM KRUEGER 

CHARLES PICKENS-E. MALICDEM 

TINO BRAGADO-NOLY BUENO 

JIM BEERE-RUDY AHONEN 

KIRK THOMPSON-MIKE LINDA 

JAY BOUMA-DON FRIEDLUND 

JEREMY PETERSEN-JEFF ASH 

JIM HENRICKS-GEORGE HALL 

BOBBY WRK3HT-KERMIT EWELL 

HOWIE JOHNSON-CHRIS HRISCHUK 

WALT WEAVER-KEVIN McMAHON 

KEVIN NELSON-DICK NELSON 

JOE CANALE-TROY ASHLEY 

RAY HAGA-RON BAWELKIEWICZ 

KEN COBURN-JON COBURN 

DEAN WOOSTER-JACK DIETZ 

BOB PRATT-BILL DEMO 

JACK DEMPSKI-TOM JAKAITIS 

JOHN GRGAS-FRED SYKES 

SAT, MARCH 3 
4;30PM 

JERRY KOSKINEN-DAN AARON 
KENT LAURET-DAVE KADISH 

RON HILL-JERRY MIZERA 

STEVE MODLIN-RON AUNET 

JACK KUTZLER-CRAIG HOOK 

TEX WILLIAMSON-BRIAN LUOSA 

CHRIS SIPOS-DAVE BLAIN 

DAVE SAVEL-TERRY SLUSSER 

RUFUS PRESLEY-STEVE CASTRO 

DAVE SINAGRA-V1NCE SCHATZ 

KEN CZYZEWICZ-JOHN HAVEMEYER 

BOB BRIGHAM-TOM MAURER 

DAVE HEHR-CHRIS HEHR 

JOE PTACEK-TOM HEHR 

BOB MOORE-MIKE GEORGE 

MARTY CAVWELS-R1CH HOFFMANN 

DAVE HORMEL-RON EDWARDS 

TED KASPER-ORIN HAPKE 

SCOTT HUDSON-BOB HARMS 

BOB CONKLIN-AL STETZ 

HERMAN PENDLETON-ED PEARCE 

LARRY LINGEN-TOM DIMITROFF 

RON BLOMBERG-JOHN KERPAN 

HARRY CARSON-JIM MONCIV1AZ 

TOM KRAUSE-JABO JABLONSKI 

STEVE CLARK-DENNIS CRAWFORD ' 

CALVIN JORDAN-OTIS MOORE 

KEN MULLAN-GLEN FLANAGAN 

JOHN V01GHT-BOB VOIGHT 
JOHN CLARK-FRANK McDONALD 

SAT, MARCH 3 
8:00 PM 

PAT CORNELL-TOM BERTRAND 

EDDIE ZELESNIK-DAVE EL ABOUOI 

JIM ERICKSON-ROGER ZUCKOWSKt 

STEVE EHEMANN-CHARLIE GINN 

DICK GOVAKAR-BRUCE KENNEDY 

ANDY BURTON-BUD McCLURE 

PETE GOCHIS-JIM GOCHIS 

GEORGE SCHULZE-BUTCH JONES 

FRED RUTTER-NORB PLATT JR. 

JIM BISHOP-DAVE BISHOP 

MIKE MOON-JOHN ROEBRICK 

PAT HUMPHREY-BRUCE HUMPHREY 

TERRY INGRAM-JOSE TANCON SR. 

PAUL VASQUEZ-C. HOCKENBERRY 

HOWIE PEMBLE-MARTY URBAN 

DAVE FINNEY-JIM BREITBACH 

FRANK WAGNER-RANDY WROBEL 

FRED READ-BRYAN SORENSEN 

TONY PANELLA-ROCKY STONE 

WALT KUBLANZA-MIKE RAPPE 

RAY MURRAY-GERRY KRAEMER 

ED MEYERS-MARK RUMMEL 




MUNDELEIN LANES 

900 S. Lake St, Mundelein 




,-um— 




IIIMIM. vU 






M 

•.***• 



THINK 
SUMMER!! 



m 



■VONTOOH BOATS: 

IB K Monarch, leaded »/40hp 16MS. 17 fi. Pontoon Bo* OM.Y K»S. 

t Coma fiihing Pontoon wMOhp J8MS mi up. 

-ION IOATS S3 W md up. 

•MOtCUnr AND FQRC t OUTBOARD* Oitef Cos *SV 

.JTAUTIH6 RATTtHU 539.95. 

•IT FT. KOFUStOMAL IASS BOAT: Jimm^ Homun Modd JMS. 

-14 FT. TTUJn IOATS wih IS HP Mctcuty, ss m 5 & Up. 

* All rtaory Oittct * Wis Freight, Prrp A linet Prlc«d good only while inwnKyy U«» 

Woodland Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 











^^est of 5^cfc cr^ovvfcrsT^ 

Biller Press 



966 Victoria • Antioch 

(847) 395-1203 
Ik FAX (847) 395-4232 J 






1 STATIONSIDE VILLAGE 1 

5215 HTH AVENUE • KENOSHA, WI 

Luxurious Living • Apartments & Townhouses 

2 Bedrooms - 2 Baths • Mini Blinds 

Appliances • Garages Available 

Elevators • No Pets 

Call (414) 656-1010 






M 



m 




BARBER SHOP 

Linden Plaza - 

Grand Ave. 
Lindenhurst IL 

(847) 356-0679 

John Milter - 
Board Member of LC.B.A. 

Best ofJLuch 
JBoivlers! 



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CLASSIFIEDlaI<eUncI Newspapers MarcIi 1, 1996 





ANTIQUES & CQAm 




antique ® cmn 



(9 



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namosa 



Ctlntk 



'ties 



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One Item Or Entire Estate 



Specializing in FumHure.„Formal To Country.. Jewelry 
Depression Glass, Toys, Dolls, Primitive Accessories, Cdlec&tes 

■mi 5 Minutes West of Gumoo Mills Mall 
Just West of RL 45 on RL 132 • 19056 VV. Grand Avo. 



DUFFY'S ATTIC 




Antiques & Collectives 

Anything from Custard 

Glass to Cannon Balls 

Buy & Sell 



CLOCK REPAIR 



Antique & Modern 

Yes. We Repair Cuckoo Clocks 

(847) 223-7454 

22 Center St., GrayslakB 

L-^a j ues ..sal. 1 0:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

"""V v Sun. 12;00 noon - 4:00 pin. 



-MARCH SPECIAL- 

Y#% Off Any Clock Brought In 

March 1 Thru March 30 

With This Coupon 



Grayslake 

Antiques 
Collectibles 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
Illinois 120 & U.S. 45 

8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

SUNDAY 
MARCH 10 

Admission '3.00 



Grayslake 



c/irts 

m 

Crafts 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, IL 

Illinois 120 & US 45 

10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

MARCH 16 & 17 

ADMISSION $2.00 

Lake County Promotions 

P.O. Box 461 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

847/223-1433 or 
847/356-7499 



ANTIQUES ® CRAFTS 




.EE33233 
Elk Grove's Largest 
Quality Antiques Hart 

134 DEALER SHOPPES 
IN 28,000 SQUARE FEET 

•Furniture k Accessories •Pottery, China h Flow Blue 

•Sliver ft Matching Service 

•Military • Toys ft Comics -Jewelry ft Walclres 

Dealer Space Available 

Open 7 Days A Week Mondjy-Fddiy 11-7; Saturday & Sunday 10-5 

(708) 894-8900 

1170 W. Devon • Elk Grove Village 



Lakeland 
Antiques & Crafts 

Antique Shops • Craft fairs 
Bazaars • CoffectiUes • Special Euents 

Let Oar Readers 
/(noa) Qhere fact fired 

Call Your Lakeland 
Pep Today 

847-223-8161 




Dealers! 



WAREHOUSE 



Quality 
Throughout! 






2 South Lake St., Grayslake 

(708) 223-9554 



Ask About 

Our New 

Libera! Daily 

Discounts! 

MS 10-5 

Sun. 12-5 

2nd Sun. 10-5 



SPRING SALE! 

March 7th-10th 

15% OFF 

PARTICIPATING BOOTHS. 

Some restrictions apply. Free flowering plant 
wfpurchase over $100.00 



ANTIQUE & UNIQUE 

The Shops Of Richmond, Illinois 

A RETURN TO YESTERYEAR 

A quaint little village in Illinois 

at the Wisconsin border. You can enjoy a 

day or two of shopping for antiques and crafts, 

dining and sightseeing. 

JYlosf of the shops and attractions are open 

daily 10:30 am to 5:00 pm year-round. 

For information, call: 

The Richmond Merchants Assocation 

(815) 678-7951 



Shopping For Value and Quality? Shop... 

Derxratment Stone of Recycled Finely 

FEATURING 10 DEALER SHOPS FULL 
OF ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES 

and.., 

HOME FURNISHINGS OF ALL ERAS 

OUR CLOTHING DEPARTMENT OPENS SOON! 



CA$H IN ON YOUR UNWANTED RECYCLABLES OF 
HIGH QUALITY CLOTHING, JEWELRY, HOME 

FURNISHINGS AND ANTIQUES AND 

COLLECTIBLES - CLEAN OUT THE CLOSETS! 

CLEAN OUT THE ATTICS! AND CALL THE 

C0NSIGNERY FOR YOUR CONSIGNING APPOINTMENT 



Cencula Court <yfr nnnn 

37041 N. Rte. 83 ^t»VUVU 
Lake Villa, II M " F 11_7 » **• 10 * 5 ' SutL 12-5 




%^ Pet Porgdg 





Advertise your... 



Pet Store, 
Grooming 
Business, Veterinary Clinic, 

* Specialty Shops... Tropical FLsh, Exotic 

Birds, Etc, or gay pet service in Lakeland 
j. Newspapers' monthly pet section and reach over 

200,000 potential customers. Don't delay - 

Call (847) 223-8161 todayl 




TRACY'S 
DOGGONE FARM 

Quality Grooming For All Breeds 
Call for Appointment 

(847)336-3343 is 

• Hand Scissoring • Opens at 5 a,m? 
• We Don't Use Tranquilizers! 

39680 Kilbournc Rd., Wadsworth, IL 




i 



The World Doesn't Need 
More Puppies and Kittens 

Spay and 
Neuter 
Assistance 
Available 

Contact: 
Animal Protection 
P.O. Box 106 
■ Gurnee, IL 60031 
7 (708)740-3977 




«■ 

i 



CANDY'S CANINES 

Attention Dog Lovers 

Want to have some fun with that special canine 
companion? Then come join us In the fast growing 
sport of dog agility! 

CANDY'S CANINES & 

Is offering group & private agility Instruc- 
tion for fun or competition. Classes held 
outdoors by experienced trainer. Call 
now for more Info, on Spring classes 



'<■ 



£ (847)395-7698 J 




*• # 






I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAYI 

The Assiai Animal Foundation 

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE... 
TOGETHER WE'LL MAKE A MIRACLE 

GIFTS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE 
NOT FOR PROFIT... VOLUNTEER 




Wi eon'l dMtroy nom*i»«« irtnultl Ttwy iiv. tn*r 
VI IhiM unctQWl II not (dope*). W» Ip4/ tnd 
rwulw. conduct ■ dynamic prt vtj.U[iwV!H»r«cY 



progi im In *• o'd.rty. prOvW* «JuC*t)on proof uru 
program ' THANK YOU FOB YOUR HELPI 



Name 



'Address . 
I City, ST . 
J Zip Code 

I 



Individual 

Membership *1 5 

Family Membership 

•20 

Donation $ H 



Please mall to: Astlsl Animal Foundation 
P.O.B. 143 Ciyttal Lake, IL 600 14^ fJ^SifH-- I 



4|| FOUR PAWS 

>#7 TRAINING CENTER 

"Positive Training With Positive Results" 

All training methods aro not alike. Como visit us during classes and observe a dif- 
ferent approach to dog training. Our methods utilize food, enthusiasm and praise, 
and exercises are broken down Into pieces both dogs and owners can manage. We 
havo classes lor puppies and older dogs, and for all levels ol obedience compel!* 
don training. For more Information please give us a call. 

COURSE 

General Obedience: 
•Puppy Kindergarten ■ 



SCHEDULE NEXT TERM STARTS 



•Basic Obedience I • 

•Basic Obedience II • 
Competition Classes: 



Thu. 6:30 PM 
Thu. 7:30 PM 
Thu. 8:30 PM 



February 29th 
February 29th 
February 29th 






•Novice (CD Title) 
•Open (COX Title) 
•Utility (UD title) • 



Wed. 7:30 PM or Thu. 9 AM 

Wed. 8:30 PM or Thu. 10 AM 

Wed 6:30 PM 

Next agility cfaaaos a tart March 4th & 5th 

Call to reserve a spot 

1080 White Road • Antloeh, IL 80002 « (847) 838*0523 



February 28th & 29th 

February 28th & 29th 

February 28th 



■ . 



•„- 



MarcIi 1, 1996 UkrlANcI Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




Easing Your Tax Burden 



Several tips on choosing a tax preparer 



ROBERT W. BROCK 

IRS District Director 

Most of you are very diligent 
about keeping good records and 
know what Federal tax forms 
you're required to file. Yet 
when the time comes to actu- 
ally fill out the tax return, about 
half of all taxpayers prefer to 
have someone else prepare it. 
Fortunately, there are profes- 
sional tax preparers in every 
city, town and neighborhood. 

If you don't have time to pre- 
pare your own tax return, 
choose to spend your time 
doing other things, or are con- 
fused and frustrated by tax 
forms and instructions, I 
encourage you to seek profes- 
sional help. 

When family and friends ask 
me to help them select a profes- 
sional tax preparer, I give them 
these five tips: 

• Always go to a preparer 
you know or one that has a 
good reputation in your com- 
munity. If you choose someone 
who does tax work on a part- 
time basis during the filing sea- 
son, make sure they'll be able 
to assist you in the future if 
there is a problem with your 



return; J 

• Never go to a preparer 
who guarantees a refund, or a 
larger refund, than other prepar- 
ers; 

• Always review your com- 
pleted tax return before you 
sign it. Question anything that- 
doesn't look right. You are 
responsible for what's on your 
return — regardless of who pre- 
pared it; 

• Never allow the refund 
check to be sent to the prepar- 
er's address, and never sign a 
blank tax return form or a 
return prepared in pencil; 

• Finally, remember that a 
paid preparer must sign their 
name, as the preparer of the tax 
return, in the spaces provided 
on the bottom of the back page 
of the return. 

Paid tax preparers must fol- 
low standards set by the IRS 
Director of Practice, and are 
subject to penalties if they 
don't. The vast majority of pre- 
parers provide a valuable ser- 
vice while following these stan- 
dards; however, if the pre- 
parer you are deal- 
ing with refuses to 
sign your return, or 



does anything suspicious, report 
it to the IRS by calling 1-800- 
829-1040. 

I know there may be some 
who can't afford to pay a tax 
preparer, but don't feel comfort- 
able preparing their own tax 
return. If you are one of these 
taxpayers, the IRS has two pro- 
grams which could help you. 

In many Illinois communi- 
ties, free help with basic tax 
return preparation is available 
from IRS-trained volunteers. 
They offer assistance to lower 
and middle income, elderly, 
handicapped and non-English 
speaking taxpayers through our 
VITA (Volunteer Income Tax 
Assistance) and TCE (Tax 
Counseling for the Elderly) pro- 
grams. Assistance sites are 
located at various community " 
centers, schools, libraries and 
senior citizen centers. Some 
sites also offer free electronic 
filing. Check your local news- 
paper to find the site near- 
est you. Since 
thou- 



sands of people take advan- 
tage of this service every 
year, don't wait until the last 
minute to go to a VITA or 
TCE site. 

One final note — beginning 
this year, the convenience and 
safety of having your tax 
refund directly deposited 
into your bank account 
will be available to every- 
one who files a paper 
return, even if someone 
else prepared it. To elect 
direct deposit, put your 
bank account information 
on the new Form 8888, 
"Direct Deposit of 
Refund," and attach it to 
your paper return. The 
new form will be includ- 
ed in the tax packages for 
Forms 1040 and 1040A, 
or can be ordered by 
calling 1-800-829- 
3676. 







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ATTEISTTIOl^s 



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Your ad can appear in this section 
&. reach over 200, OOO readers. 

Call your Classified 
Account Executive @ 

847-223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



INCOME 
TAXES 

PERSONAL-BUSINESS 
-ESTATES 

OPEN ALL YEAR 
HOURS 9 AM TO 9 PM 

EST. 1960 

ROBERT ItWEGGE, LTD. 

265 Center St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 

847-223-0777 



Accounting & 

Income Taxes 

(847) 356-4290 

CARL SAND 

Enrolled Agent 

400 E. Grand Ave. 

Suite B 
Lake Villa, 1l 60046 



Accountants and 
Tax Consultants 

TAX RETURN PREPARATION 

ACCOUNTING SERVTCK 

ELECTRONIC FILING 

CORPORATE RETURN PREPARATION 

REFUND ANTCIPATKDN LOANS 

ESTATE & FINANCIAL PLANNING 

Cote & Wright 

1304 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

(847)662-6019 

(800) 458-7371 

SERVING NORTHERN «r^ 

ILLINOIS FOR MORE ^H 
THAN40YEARS ™— ^ 



1 



I COMPREHENSIVE' 
The Tax 
Professionals, 

Daniel E. CouIon^EA 

Enrolled to practice 
before the IRS 

564 N. Rt. 83 
Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-4040 

mrmfCTRONic 

LMTAXFBJNG 



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yip, 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



& £ A 4 A A 4 A A 4 * * 
A J & L Landscaping, lee* A 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



Design and Plantings 

Seed & Sod 

Wall Systems 

Boulder & Timber Walls 

Drainage Systems 

lor est., col 
(847) 526-7017 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



AAAAAAAAAAA A 



'Pj ^btjeth littttjitTtti^j^t&tmm 



HI* Service 

Carpentry • Electrical 
Plumbing 

All phases of home 
remodeling & repair 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 587-0937 



Precise 
Painting 



Never A 
Charge 

For 
Estimates 
Interior/Exterior 

New Construction, or we 
can make it took like new 

CALL (708) 546-2860 
OR (708)395-0490 



i* Lozano's* 

I Heating & Cooling 

' Appliance Sales & Service . 
J Also Available. 

1 Call For Prices & Estimate 

p) 862-2396 



•••LOW RATES*** 
HEANEY'S INSIDE 

RV STORAGE 
SUMMER SPECIAL 

Any Size Boat Trailer 
$25.00 per month 

or 

2 Snows on Trailer 

■1m 
Cars- Pop Up a- Boats 

PWC Molor Homes, Traders etc. 
Store anylhlng on wheels. 

(847) 587-9100 




Hirgiritis 
Slushies 

and More! 

Frsm Bitfiujt 

Hicbiii Riitil 

- PirllM 

•BfrtMifi 

• GrtJiilliti 

- tfiUiHt 

147-487-6887 




JLaursen & 



Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
Strength 
You Can 

mm m^ (70 8) 838-5300 



Free Estimates 






Dependable 

Swimming 
Pool & Spa 

Above-Ground Pools, Spas, 

Chemicals, Equipment & Accessories 

Complete Maintenance & Service 

Visit Our Showroom Anytimell 

124 S. Route 83 
Grayslake, IL. 

223-1606 




•«■■' i*?~< c 



SMITH 

Spray-Brush & Roll 



WATERSEAL 
PAINT - STAIN 



Siding, turn. wood, di y wall block. 

stucco, concrete,-, 

We have ihc experience ona ihe equipment 

todotnejoonghi 

Free Estimates Reasonable Rales 

(708) '244-2202 ASK FOR MEL 



• -' i-t 



tM**kSVtoh*3r...'»l SMC A 'JiU '< ^tMMii} 2c-3tt& 






. 



1 




CLASSIFIED LaIceIancI NcwspApttts MarcIi 1, 1996 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



_r 



TO PLACE 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

708-223-8161 



m 



□ ' 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 






800 Number - 130/miii. 

Cnitip Rates Willi Nutinmil Long DiHtiutcn Ciirriur 

Voice Mail 

$10/monlli with Call Forwnnling. BtuilteM t>r Personal 

Voice Messaging 

* Sales -k itniiul "A" Consulting ■*" 

IVOTEL COMMIMCATIOMS 

740- 



HANDYMAN 

'Ml Types of Home Reprint, 
Clean-ups and Improvements' 

Fix it, Patch it, Paint it 
I'll Help You Do It! 

For a quick response 

and quality insured 

workmanship 

call Jay 

847-526-6364 



RECYCLE! 

Caih For 
•Aluminum Cans 

• All Other Scrap Metals 
Industrial Accounts Welcome 

Chicago Surplus 

* 11304 260th Avenue 

Trevor, Wl 



Price Subject To Chinge 

LOCATION: Ttevoi VVI |5 minutes 
Norln ol Aniioch) Take H*jr C one 
milL" *esl ol Route A3 Tu'n Norln on 
259th SI Veer to tell 'or 2 blocks (neit 
10 Fo«y s Tavern) 

Man. • Fri. 8:30 am - 5 pm 

Saturday 8:30 am - 3:30 pm 

(414) 862-2517 

(414) 862-2554 



JACK'S 
REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

Dormers « Siding • Soffit 
Windows • Decks • Bathrooms 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 
(847) 546-3759 




Sp 



Joy-Us Wedding 
Accessories 

Bride's Satin Card Purse, 

Bridal Bouquet, 

Veil, Carter 

Flowergirl Basket, 

Ring Pillow 

(847) 587-0199 



Heating 
Problems? 



Professional Solutions 
Reasonable Prices 

Call 

HmtWave 

SALES 
AND SERVICE 



E.KA. Certified-Insured 
Free Est. -Senior Dis. 

740-4127 

Subsidiary of 
Five Star Rest. Serv., Corp, 



Gm/4T * UfUitt^ C£u*uj 

prints.. 

Situfify tie SW/ 

A.ppethers 

furniture moved,,.,. fj/(j 

Spot rrmovaL... ...... ^,g 

btuehoanti wiped, j. /r 

♦mvel fee. „. . . 



GLntreer 

carpet cleaned....... 

upholstery denned 

Msinn,..,,,,,,,,,,,,,^,,,., 

desserts - 

3M Srotiligard,..,. 
ianllUJnj„„...„.„„. 

ph soflrnlng... ........ 



.18C sq a 

,65c in 
$1.50 ea 



.10c \\ ft 

.IflCiqft 
N/C 



1(847)247-8100 
1 (800) 739-8200 




CONSTRUCTION ; GENERAL CARPENTRY 

•Custom Decks 

•Porches 'Room Additions 'Basement Remodeling 
•Bathrooms - Kitchens •Custom Carpentry 'Improvements & Repairs! 

INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-8442 

Please Call Gary Kolkau 




Easy PC 

Computer System 

Installation 

Maintenance 

Small Business 
Automation 

(847) 526-0454 



GINO'S 
DECORATING 

Painting & Staining 
Call New 
Free Estimates 
. Affordable Rates 

Fully Insured 
Quality Work with 
Written Guarantee 

C847) S26-21Q7 / 







$> mm .«<*& 

>V From $29 'Tfi 



V> ' worn ^*v ^-f'Cl* 

NO ATTORNEYS, FAST, SIMPLE, NO WAITING * 

BUSINESS PLANS • RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 

WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 

548-1300 





RESIDENTIAL 

ROOFING 
CONTRACTOR 

COMPLETE ROOFING SERVICE 

SVARAS ROOFINGl 

Island Lake, IL 

526-2304 

•take advantage of our 

reduced winter pricing, BPJl 

wuue warranty, siunc t pud Uy 



OKI e WAV 



A 




AREA RUGS FROM 
YOUR SCRAP CARPET! 

CARPET BINDING 
FRINGING 

REPAIRS 

i COMPLETE CUSTOM RUG SERVICES 

CUSTOM BINDING SERVICE 

708-566-6734 

PICKUP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE ] 



Change. 



} CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICeIT 
/ ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
I "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 

33265 N.Rte. 45 

Wildwood, ILL. 60030 

(708) 223-4682 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 

T¥7 



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^lllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllll ItlllllllllllllU' 

George's 
Decorating 

Paint & Wallpaper 

Interior & Exterior 

General Repairs 

Quality Work 

PAINT & WALLPAPER 1 

SPECIAL 

*75 PER ROOM 

= ,Free Estimates • Written Guarantee = 

1 .30% OFF with this ad | 
(847) 548-5110 

.TiiiiiiiimiiiiiiniiiiriiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiHiiirr. 




EL 



TO BEST 

BUSINESS 

DIKeCT LINE 

V 223-8161 J 

CLINT DAVIS 

Builder-Remodeler 

SINCE 1960 

-Room Additions 

-Kitchens & Baths 

-Window Replacement 

-New Homes & Design Service 

Call 847-872-4366 

Fully Insured 



Take advantage of 
this special offer, and 
look spiffy all year! 
Let us design and 
print your new area 
code business cards. , 



It happens to the best of us. 



OFF" 

I all business ! 
I card printing | 

I through May 1,1996, i 

, with this ad. ' 

i ^™ ^™ ^™ m~ Ma Ha bJ 



" Logo Design 

• Layout/TypcsctlinE/Graphics 

• Business Cards/Letterhead 

265-0986 



m 



ier*s 



Graphic Arl & Dosign 



1 ALUMINUM 8 
VINYL SIDING 

• VINYL REPLACEMENT 

WINDOWS 

Sof In & Fascia 
i j, Window Trim - References. 
Work Guaranteed • 
Insured - Free Estimates 
ic .'~l 26 yrs. Experience 

*1& EAGLE SIDING CO. 
'Mk (708)526-7222 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. Highway 45 

Wildwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8691 





NORGE 
REMODELING 



Specializing in Kitchens & Baths 
Complete Remodeling Service 

Tel. 815-344-4712 
Fax 815-344-4736 



WJJLJ 



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COMPLETE 

DECORATING SERVICE 
1 Call Does H MIIII 

Exterior/Interior Painting 

and Wall Papering 

Remodeling 

'Bathrooms 'Basements 

•Kitchens m Rec Rooms 

Deck Construction/Maintenance - 

All Home Repairs wilh llconssd . 

'■', , , ElectrlclarVPIumber 

Intund, Free Estimates, Senior Discounts 

(847)604-1629 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



AiAAIAiAAiilJi 

'A 
A 
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CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC. 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS & CONTRACTORS 
Serving Lakt County Since I960 
•Computer Design 'Seeding 
•Flagstone Patios "Sodding 
•Stone Walls 'Planting 

•Texture Gardens -Grading 

(708) 746-8953 



A 4 A A A A A * * * A * 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS •DOORS 

DEQKS • AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 

(847)438-6634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



BUYING 

Aluminum Cans 

*COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 
'LEAD *ALUMINUM 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-0788 

-or- 

1000 Rand Rd(R1. 12), Unit 212 

Wauconda, IL 

(708) 526-0760 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Fri. 

9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 

Closed 12-12:30 

— z 











Mam* 1, 1996 LaIceIancI Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



»!-. 



»-.• -, 



>- _.*u 






s 



Are You Paying Lo 

Little Time 

On The Internet? 



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ESSSKS 



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The Internet is an enjoyable and 
useful source of information for 
many people. However, if you 
have any experience with it, 
you know how fast those 
usage bills can add up. 
That's why Lakeland 
netDIRECT offers you a 
local connection - to let 
you spend more time 
browsing, less time paying 
high Internet usage bills. 
Call netDIRECT today and see 
what a difference a local phone 
call can make. Then go ahead, surf! 



With Lakeland netDIRECT, youll get... 

• Local Phone Call For Over 30 Prefixes • Unlimited Use 

• Chat Groups • News Groups • E-Mail 

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For More Information, Call: 

E-Mail: service@lnd.com ih|l| R — »—- W- 

Visit us on the Internet *& Lfi^l £%, — W K 



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'Lakeland netDIRECT offers local phone charges to most of the Lake County area. Call for information about your prefix. 



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1 LIPSERVICE LaIceUncI Ncwsp/vpcre MaucU 1, 1996 






LIPSERVICE 



It's tIhe taLIc of The towin 

Get iT off youR c^est (847) 22 5*-8075 




Lakeland 

Or Newspapers 



Lipservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does not 
claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to 
edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 
and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the call is 
anonymous, please leave your village name. 

Editor's note: Due to the large numbcrof to get around us, but if you like the 
calls and tire limited amount of space, electricity that runs your alarm clock 
messages might not appear the week so you can work, you'll just have to 



they arc given. We will get your message 
in as soon as space permits. Please do not 
* call again to repeat your comments. 
Lakeland Newspapers thanks you for 
your patience in this matter. 

Frustrated driver 

Slow drivers are a pain, a menace and 
ignorant. It's frustrating to get behind 
one. Maybe (hey aren't actual citizens 
of the country or something, I've got 
one word for you slowpokes — METRA. 

Three cheers 

Congratulations, freshmen Grant 
Bulldog Cheering Squad forgetting 
second place in the Stevenson compe- 
tition. Way to go, you're shining with 
the stars! 

Be considerate 

Dear "Love thy neighbor," there is 
more than one family trying to sell 
their house. Why don't you try think- 
ing about someone other than yourself 
besides hiding behind those stupid 
signs? 

Concerned 

I'm from Antioch and want to make a 
note about the dangerously cold tem- 
peratures last week. It seems none of 
our area schools were off. Is anyone 
else out there as concerned as I am 
about this? 

So sorry 

This is in response to (he comments 
made by (he bus drivers about the 
slow moving ta/y jerk tree trimmers. I 
am a tree trimmer for (he power lines. 
I'm sorry we make it difficult for you 



deal with it. Or maybe find a different 
route. If we're moving too slow, I apol- 
ogize. We're only trying to make our 
work look as good as we can. 

Who's next? 

The Mike and Mayor show in 
Grayslake, along with the village 
board, are throwing their weight 
around dealing with the park district 
and high school. And they even have 
their noses in the library's business. 
Why does the village government 
think they know more about recreation 
than our own degreed people. They 
want to hire their own people to run 
the community center and pool. Is our 
fine fire department the next body to 
be insulted and called dumb by them? 

Aren't you proud? 

To the mayor of Round Lake, James 
Lumber Hey, Jimmy, were you able to 
keep a straight face when you men- 
tioned building quality homes in the 
new Pritzker development? By the 
way, how is Parkview going? Vou 
failed to mention those in your state- 
ment regarding achievements of the 
village. Aren't you proud of what's 
happening there? 

Yes, they're real 

I'm calling from Lake Zurich. I called 
to say my newspaper uncle lives in 
Minnesota and he would write to the 
editor's column whenever the incom- 
ing letters Irickled off. He said it was 
"seed" to get the readership riled up. A 
small example was (hat he said people 
should feed and prolcct the common 
housefly. He was right, the letters 



would pour in. I wonder how many 
peculiar Lipservice calls, especially 
lately, arc really seed letters. Most 
calls seem sincere and genuine, but 
many seem a bit off the wall. They're 
all fun to read, though. 
Editor's note: In answer to your 
comments, although this might be 
true of some editors, the 
Lipservice Editor has no need to 
plant "seed" letters in this column. 
(One can only wish for the kind of 
imagination it takes to think up 
some of them!) All of the com- 
ments, although sometimes edited 
for content, arc from actual read- 
ers calling in their opinions. 



Never left 

I ley, Lakeland, you really blew It by 
getting rid of Mary Foley. We readers 
in Antioch miss all of her articles. She 
was truthful In her editorial and put a 
lot of thought in her work. Do you 
ever think of getting her back? 
Editor's note: Mary Foley is still 
with Lakeland, but focusing her 
talents in another direction by 
being involved with Lakeland 
Netuircct. 

Hip, hip, hooray! 

I'd like to congratulate the Antioch 
varsity cheerleaders on a great season. 



They took T4th down In Nashville, 
Tenn. at the Nationals competition and 
2nd at the Palatine competition and 
4th at Stevenson. I wish them luck for 
the State competition on March 91 

Buses are filthy 

I'm calling as a concerned parent in (he 
Lake Villa School District. The school 
buses our children are riding in are in 
absolute filthy condition. I had the oppor- 
tunity to be inside of a couple of them 
and was disgusted. Also, you can see a 
lot of buses down the street with filthy 
windows. I think it's a safety hazard and 
something should be done' about it. 
See LIPSERVICE page C21 



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See these exhibitors & more... 



A io Z Rental Center 

Advertiser 

Air Controllers Of Northern Illinois 

Allied Air Conditioning 

American Legion Post #703 

Backyard Enclosures 

Bark 'N Town 

Bonnie Thompson Carter 

Bulletin 

Camp Fire Boys and Girls 

Career Resume 

Cass J 'holography 

Dust Bunnies Cleaning Service 

Fabian Chimney Services 

First of America Bank 

Firstar Fox Lake 

Fleet Service 



Four Oaks Development " 

Fox Lake Grade School District HI 14 

Fox Lake Lions Club 

Fox Lake Chiropractic 

Fox Lake Fire Dcpt, 

Fox Riverboal Limited Partnership 

Fox IjUcc Ace Hardware 

Fox Lake District Library 

Fox Lake Police Depl. 

Fox Ijkc Travel 

Girl Scouts 

Grant Township 

Grant Township Area Athletic Assn. 

Grant Community High School 

Hidden Cove Cellular 

JB Glass Window & Door 

Jcny*s Farkway Foods 



K.K. Homshcr 

Korpan's SnoKommanders 

Lakeland Community Bank 

Lilac Apts. 

Lioness Club of Fox Lake 

Lynn's Hair Reflections 

Mar Bell Enterprises 

Radicom Inc. 

Robert D. Styles Education Foundation 

S & R Healing & Cooling 

Second Federal Savings 

Smothers Fence & Docks 

Sun Haven Enclosurers 

Trinity Lutheran Church 

U.S. Coast Guard Aux. 

Village of Fox Lake 

YMCA Camp Duncan 



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t's tihe taIIc oF tIhe tow/in 

ET iT OFF yOUR chEST (847) 225-8075 



,m page C20 

o something else 

calling from Lake Zurich and just 
my Chestnut Comers development 
.vslclier. In Ihc newsletter, they said 
\y said their mission is to create a 
lie, friendly and unified subdivision 
acting as a liaison between our ( 
munity and Lake Zurich village 
Ida Is, positioning Chestnut Comers 
lihe premier address In Lake Zurich." 
hi At the bottom, they write 
hestnut Comers, the premier address 
Lake Zurich." Double Hahl I think 
sc fatheads should do something 
besides deciding who's hot and 
i's not. 

ouble dipping 

cslion of the weeV: Why is it that 
pay Waste Management to pick up 
rccyclables and then turn around 
self them to make money off of it 
ice? Anybody got any answers? 

litting hairs 

too bad that at (he Grayslakc 
Ice Department they have more 
portant things to do than to enforce 
> teens from smoking. Many thanks 
(he Libertyville Police for thinking it 
mportant. If it's so difficult to 
brcc, then let the kids drink and do 
gal drugs, too. Gurnee also needs 
adopt a policy on smoking. When I 
cd a security guard about smoking 
ns at Gurnee Mills, he said, "It's 
gal to buy cigarettes, not smoke 
m." Does that mean it's okay for 
ns to drink, but not buy liquor? Lot's 
p splitting hairs here. 

hat's going on? 

live on Lake Shore Blvd. In 
Wauconda. We always get building 
i permits when we add things to our 
1 house. But this family who lives on our 
street by the Carp Pond with political 



connections, put a big new deck on 
their summer shack without gelling a 
building permit. Before that they put a 
storage bam in without a permit. We 
called the village and they said they 
could not find the new deck or the 
bam. You can see It from ihe street. 
Mayor, what's going on? 

Another ploy 

Here we go, again. Now, people 
beware about the dome the Bears 
want. It's another ploy of Republicans 
wanting to get your money. They're 
going to bring back that stale Income 
tax plus a sales tax. When you go to 
the polls, remember the Republicans 
are doing it. You'll pay through the 
nose. 

Get the facts 

I'm calling In response to "Candy from 
babies." I'm not sure who this person 
Is, but she really needs to get her facts 
straight. What she's quoted in the 
comment Is not all true. The people 
who are at the top of our council are 
not paid lavish salaries or work in lav- 
ish surroundings. People need to get 
their facts straight before they call in to 
Lipscrvice. ~ . 

Letters delayed 

I'm calling to let the public know that 
the management at the Mundetein Post 
Office have been authorized to delay 
first class mail. This is a new practice 
and many employees don't approve of 
It. Our Job is to get the mat) up and 
out every day. If anyone Is missing a 
first class letter or magazine, call the 
management at the Mundelein Post 
Office, 566-7167. Maybe your letter 
was delayed that day. 

Leave him alone 

This is in response fo "Adopt a dog." 
I'd like to see everyone leave this guy 
alone. I drive by this place several 




MARck 1, 1996 UlcclANd Newspaper UPSERVICE 

MM 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



times day and night. Obviously, 
you're driving by when this dog is 
getting an outside break. Leave him 
alonet * 

How cold was it? 

Regarding District 46, the coldest days 
of the year, and school Isn't canceled? 
I don't wonder why. Both the principal 
of Avon School and the superintendent 
of District 46 walked in with full 
length fur coats. How cold was it at 
the bus stops that day? Taxes well 
spent? 1 don't think so. 

Try it sometime 

The people (mostly men) who don't 
think the Mundelein Train Station 
needs a bathroom should try some 
morning getting to the train station and 
waiting for the train which may be 
late, getting on the train and putting up 
with it rocking back and forth on the 
way downtown. 

Highway robbery 

I was just reading the Feb. 9 edition 
with the headline "Severe cuts if pro- 
posal falls." What a crock. What are 
impact fees for? My taxes are over 
$4,000. I'm a new resident of Country 
Walk. This Is highway robbery! 

Remember 

Abandoned? Superintendent Mary 
Davis said she never felt more aban- 
doned than she did today in a Feb. 9 
article in the Round Lake News article 
, "Schools plea for state help." I 
remember eight weeks in late 1 994 
when our students and parents were 
abandoned. I hope everybody remem- 
bers this strike come March and votes 
no to any more money for this bunch 
of Incompetent people. 

Sutton's charming 

I want to acknowledge the wonderful 
column, "Partly Ruth" by Ruth Sutton. 



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Her warm conversational writing style 
describing the history of our area is 
like a nostalgic visit at Grandma's 
knee. It's a charming piece of journal' 
ism that's become the highlight of The 
Fox Lake Press. Ms. Sutton Is to be 
commended. 

Don't tolerate it 

This Is to respond to "Check teach- 
ers, " where a child was coming 
home talking about teachers belittling 
students. How can you leave your 
child In a classroom like that? If you 
know your child could possibly be in 
danger, physically or mentally, it is 
your responsibility to stop It. How 
can you send your child off to school 
each morning knowing there's a pos- 
sibility that he could be told he's 
worthless or stupid? You want to 
change a teacher's style, take your 
child out of the classroom. That child 
has no one else to protect'them, just 
you. 

Permanent home 

Dear Country Walk residents, I hope 
you're not planning on selling in the 
near future. With all the fantastic. . 
publicity you've been having in 
Lipservice, I myself, and at least 1 5 
other 1 people who were looking in the 
area, have decided to look in other 
subdivisions. Before you call and 
make your comments, think about 
your future. Are you planning on liv- 
ing there forever? At this rate, you 
will be. 

Above the law 

Mayor Hamsher, why is it the cement 
plant Is still standing there like a big 
piece of garbage? Is it because the 
owner is a mayor from another town? 
Well, if we break the law by not doing 
what the town wants us to, we get 
fined. Why not him? Is he above the 
law? 



Just punk criminals 

To the white guy who believes the 
black guy In the Michael Jordan case, 
it's not the Michael Jordan case, it's 
the killing of his father. The white guy 
he doesn't believe isn't a white guy, 
he's an Indian from the Carolina tribe. 
They're both career punk criminals. I 
don't care what happens to either one 
of them, they can string them up right 



now. 

Much needed 

The Solid Waste Agency of Lake 
County wants to have a household 
hazardous waste site in our county 
and it's much needed. This is for 
things that homeowners pour down 
Ihc drain: paint thinner, used paint, 
pesticides, etc. Why do they always 
want lo place these things in working 
class towns, never the affluent commu- 
nities. It makes these towns even less 
desirable. Put these things in rich 
neighborhoods. 

Need alien law 

I currently live near Round Lake High 
School and would like to go door to 
door in my neighborhood and ask one 
question. Why do we have so many 
Hispanlcs living in Round Lake? The 
reason I want to do this is because I 
believe Hispanlcs shouldn't be 
allowed in (his country. California had 
a great idea when they decided to 
make a law that restricted illegal aliens 
lo receive benefits. Our governor 
needs to propose this type of law for 
Illinois. I walk past these people and 
they're rude and inconsiderate. The 
younger generation gives me the 
Impression that they don't want to be 
successful. Call me a racist, but I 
majored in philosophy at the 
University of Illinois and I know that 
every person that is not in the 
Hispanic culture believes me. 



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SPORTS/LEISURE UktlANcl Newspapers MarcH 1, 1996 



Wolves winger Breslin helping kids to read 



After moving away as a child 
from his hometown of Elmhurst, 
Chicago Wolves left wing Tim 
Breslin has come back to the 
area. 

Breslin, 28, travels from 
Hhrary to library with plans to 
help inspires kids to read. 



So far he's helped kick of the 
new "Read to Succeed" program 
at the Fox Lake District Library, 
the Warren-Newport Library and 
is the process of heading to the 
FJa Area and Grayslake libraries. 

Besides meeting the "hockey- 
hero," participants can win such 



So far he's helped kick of the new "Read 
to Succeed" program at the Fox Lake 
District Library, the Warren-Newport 
Library and is the process of heading to 
the ElaArea and Grayslake libraries. 



things as hockey game tickets, 
hockey pucks and pennants. 

Students in fourth, fifth and 
sixth grade arc asked to read and 
chart up to 1,000 minutes by the 
end of the contest April 20. 

Though he was always in love 
with hockey as well as other 
sports, Breslin professes he never 
put his homework on the back 
burner. 

While his own educator began 
at a Catholic grade school, he was 
suddenly up and moving to 
Dubuque, Iowa at the age of 16. 

Later he was playing on the 
Junior Hockey League and was 
awarded a scholarship to Lake 
Superior State University. 

In 1907-08 he played on the 



National Championship team at 
Lake Superior State University 
and signed as a free agent by the 
Los Angeles Kings. 

There he played three seasons 
1991.-92 through 1993-94 for 
King's affiliate, the Phoenix 
Roadrunncrs, posting a career- 
high 14 goals.and 44 points dur- 
ing the 1992-93 season. 

After signing a two-year con- 
tract with the Wolves, he moved 
back closer to his hometown. 

Breslin said his greatest hock- 
ey moment was wining the 
National Championship with 
Lake Superior State, and meeting 
President Ronald Reagan at the 
White House.— by TINA L. 
SWIECH 




Tim Breslin 



SPORTS/LEISURE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



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this week I CLC wrestlers Pope, Kerns place at national meet 



Family affair 

Sports a family effort 
NIU site of reunion 
PAGEC25 

CLC challenge 

Gome on strong 
in final game 
PA.GE C25 

Majik Miliwork 
top bowling team 

The 67th Lake County 
Bowling Association Annual 
Team Tournament is history. 
The Majik Miliwork from 
Antioch Bowl went on a blitz 
scoring 3526 to take over 
unofficial first place. Dutch 
Stilkc and Chuck Walsh both 
from Lakes Bowl, had a game 
of 289. Mike Malicki, captain 
of the Majik Miliwork team, 
had a game of 2fl0. Following 
are the unofficial winners: 

1— Majik 
Millwork/Antioch Bowl, 3526 
(Mike Malicki, 676; Dewey 
Feltner, 538; Jason Malicki, 
544; Bill Weeks, 681; Lou 
Villareal,544);2— 
Trash/Bowlarium Lanes, 
3430; 3— Norbert 
Plating/Lakes Bowl, 3423 
(1994 champions); 4— Patton 
Screw Products/Grand Bowl, 
3404; 5 — Madison Ave. 
Restaurant/Bertrands, 3367; 
6— Halo/Erickson's Pro 
Shop/Fairhaven, 3359; 7— 
Iiike County Press/Bertrand's, 
3349; 8— Polish Home/Grand 
Bowl, 3349; 9— The 
Point/Bertrand's,3326; 10— 
■ Classic Ghevrolet/Bcrtrand's, 
3312. A score of 3284 was still 
in the money, ^ 

The Halo/Erickson's Pro 
; Shop from the Hawthorn 
Men's Classic League (Jim 
Erickson, Dick Stone, Bruce . 
I SiegeL Tom Bcrtrand, and Pat 
Cornell), with a big 738 series, 
led the team to the scratch 
championship. There were 
I seven 700 or more series and , : 
fhlrie Individual games of 275 
or more, ; - V; ^'• : - : ::^- 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Two new names will be added to a display 
of All-American honors at College of Lake 
County. 

Freshmen Vcrnoc Pope was sixth place at 
177 pounds while Joe Kerns garnered seventh 
place at 142 pounds. The national meet was 
held at Bismark, North Dakota. 

"I'm excited about it You never know how 
well you will do. Both were focused and 
stepped it up," CLC Coach Stan Pasicwicz 
said. 

Being first-year wrestlers may have 



worked to their advantage. 

"There was not a lot of pressure because 
no one expected us to do anything," Kerns 
said. 

"I just wanted to try and place," Pope said. 

Pope injured a shoulder in his last match, 
thus not allowing him to continue. A fresh- 
man from Waukegan, he beat Bill Rahm of 
Fergus Falls (Minn.) 3-1 In the first battle 
then stopped Josh Clausen of Northern 
Idaho 4-1. 

"In the first period, he got a takedown, 
but he hurt his shoulder. He did not even 
realize It because the adrenaline was flow- 



ing," Pasicwicz said. 

Pope wrestled for two and one-half years 
at varsity in Waukegan and just missed quali- 
fying for the state meet 

Kerns, of Grayslake, lost his first match to 
Tim Stringer of Lassen 5-0. His win was over 
Jeff Hargraves of Ellsworth, Iowa 5-4. 

"Joe got a takedown In the second period 
and got a reversal and kept putting pressure 
on the other kid," Pasicwicz said. 

Pasicwicz said both have the potential to 
be national champs next year. 

"We should do roal awesome next year," 
Kerns predicted. 



Graham Droves consistent force for Carmel 



STEVE PETERSON 



■■-.-.-'■ 



■ 



Staff Repoier 

Positive consistency, at least 
at Carmel High School, is spelled 
G-R-A-H-A-M. 

Whether diving for a pass 
(and ending a football season) or 
the dribble penetration, Mike 
Graham has been a force for the 
Corsairs. He scored another 25 
points, in a regular-season end- 
ing 78-57 home loss to St Joseph. 
"He has scored in double fig- 
ures the whole season. He is a 
competitive kid and he has be- 
come a leader in football and 
basketball," Carmel Coach Ben 
Berg said of the senior. 

Graham and his teammates 
were optimistic Sunday as they 
prepared to take on Warren High, 
the second seed of the Waukegan 
sectional on Feb. 28. At stake was 
a spot in the March 1 regional fi- 
nal round. 

"We do not have too much 
pressure on us. We know we can 
do well against them because we 
did play well early in the year 
against them," Graham said. 

Graham said he feels com- 
fortable shooting from the arc 
and closer. He made 65 two- 
pointers, 20 threes (half of the 
team league total) and 55 free 
throws in 13 league games. 

Coach Berg said Graham has 
improved most on his passing. 

"It was not too different. I just 
had a little more desire. In some 
games, 1 did feel like a marked 
man," Graham said. "I just work 
harder to get open. " 

Carmel finished the regular 
season with a 6-10 mark, 2-11 in 
the East Suburban Catholic 
Conference. Graham was within 
seven points as finishing as the 



leading league scorer. He earned 
all-ESCC status. 

"Bill Taylor (assistant coach) 
told me about it in the fourth 
quarter," Graham said. But he 
could not get three more treys to 
fall. 

The visitors led early, 19-8 af- 
ter one as the ESCC power set the 
pace for a seven three-point field 
goat night and 12th win in 13 



league games. 

Mike Malonc gave Carmel 
two double-digit scorers against 
St Joseph with 10 points. Eric 
Ames, Canmcl's second leading 
scorer, had eight points for 118 in 
league games. 

"We are disappointed with 
losing as many games as we 
had, but we always play hard 
and have been in a lot of 



games," Graham said. 

He said basketball is the more 
natural sport since his days at St 
Joseph grade school in 
Liberty ville. 

. His prep football days were 
over when he dove for a touch- 
down pass against the South, 
breaking his collarbone. 

"I just had to heel it up," 
Graham said. 



wnnnieo j±> yuui 



-rr- ' 






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Off the Rope 

From left, Brian Schenk and Dan Battles, host of U.S. Cable public access show "Off the Rope," 
toss Lake Villa resident Shannon Michael off their shoulders during a break in the action at the 
World Championship Wrestling tour at Great Lakes Naval Training Center. The public access 
show keeps Lake Couritians up to speed on wrestling events and personalities. A hotline gives 
daily updates at 265-0851. The show airs Monday at 7 p.m. and live the last Thursday of the 
month at 8 p.m. 



I & , 






MarcIi 1, 1996 UblANd Newspapcrs SPORTS/LEISURE 





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Coleman, Huskies save best for last in victory 




STEVE PETERSON - 

Staff Reporter 

For the first 25 minutes 
Stevenson High graduate Chris 
Coleman was on the basketball 
court for Northern Illinois, it was 
largely a workmanlike effort. 

Battling for a rebound here, 
an assist there, later a free throw. 
Then came the 1:12 mark with 
the Huskies holding onto a three- 
point lead. 

Coleman took charge as he 
swished a three-pointer. Me 
would finish with nine points in 
an 01-71 NIU win. There were 
5,243 fans on hand as NIU con- 
tinued its late-season charge 
Saturday. 

"We did abetter job of having 
a better balance in the second 
half and getting the bail inside. 
Mike Hartkc took the bail to the 
basket - Coleman got us started 
as he came up with some great 
offensive rebounds and put- 
backs. That gave us a chance to 



pick-up at three-quarter court 
(defense). It got them out of the 
perimeter plays," NIU Coach 
Brian I lammcl said. 

Hammcl Is pleased with the 
progress the junior from Buffalo 
Grove has made since an early- 
season injury as he missed 13 
games due to a broken bone in an 
ankle. 

"He has played good basket- 
ball. We arc over that hump. Up 
until two games before when we 
went on the road to Cleveland 
State (a 61-53 NIU win), that I 
had to remind the staff. this is. 
Chris' ninth or 10th game. He 
should be home free, We were 
conservative against Cleveland 
State and be more, inside ori- 
ented. That hurt Chris. 
Milwaukee and Butler he was in a 
good offensive rhythm. Tonight 
, was a carry-over. I will tell him to 
get back into that scoring mental- 
ity. If there is a post guy open, we 
need to keep that open. That 



Lady Lancers challenge EGC 



College of Lake County wom- 
en's basketball team challenged 
Elgin in the second half in mak- . 
ing the Spartans cam a Skyway 
Conference win. 

The Lancers fell 67-52 after 
cutting 10 points from a 17-point 
halftime deficit. 

"We did two things well which 
we have not done well all year - 
wc shot the ball well and wc 
rebounded well," CLC Coach 
Don Zcman said. 

CLC reached seven points 
down with 2:30 to go but Elgin 
made its free throws. 

Tasha Bryd had 13 points and 

Kenya Mason had 11. "Many of 



those came inside against their 
bigger players," Zcman said. 

CLC completed the regular 
season 2-22, 0-10 Skyway 
Conference with a 66-37 loss to 
national power McHcnry. "Wc 
did not have the same intensity," 
Zcman said. 

The second win came as 
Malcom X had to forfeit its win 
over the Lancers. 

Mason, a North Chicago High 
grad, had 18 points. 

CLC dashed in Des Plaines 
with Oakton in the sectional 
opener Tuesday. "We led in the 
second half both times against 
them," Zcman said. 



Avon sets baseball/softball sign-ups 

Avon Township Youth Baseball (ATYB) offers baseball and Softball 
for boys and girls, ages 7 to 16. There are teams that play in the in- 
house leagues along with traveling teams. The final registration is 
March 2 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Calvary Church next to McGhcc 
Middle School on Cedar Lake Rd. just south of Washington St in 
Round Lake. 

All new players must provide a birth certificate for us to keep. There 
is no guarantee for placement on a team after March 2. All returning 
players that have not turned in their uniforms from last year will not be 
allowed to play until the uniform is turned in or paid for, with no 
exceptions. 

If you have any questions about the ATYB program, call 223-9299. 

NorthShore Horseshoe Club sets meeting 

The North Shore Horseshoe Club is holding an organizational 
meeting, March 5, 7-0 p.m. at the Belviderc Recreation Center, 412 S. 
l.cwis Ave. All interested players arc encouraged to attend. 

The club is open to women and men of any age. 

The club meets Tuesdays at 6 p.m. at Victory Park in Waukegan. 
The starting date will be announced at the March 5 meeting. 

For more information call Ken Baartz at 244-0459. 



Viking Football holds open meeting 

Antioch Viking Football will hold an open board meeting on Mar. 4, 
1996 at 7:30 p.m. in the Antioch Community Building's Maplcthropc 
Room. The purpose of the meeting is to review the results of the 1995 
rattle fundraiser and to explore ideas to generate operational funds for 
1996. Everyone interested in supporting the future of Antioch Viking 
Football is welcome to attend 




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three-pointer was a big basket for 
us," Hammcl said. 

"That was the key shot of the 
game," Wright State Coach Ed 
Underfill!. 

NIU was led by a balanced at- 
tack with 14 points from James 
Patterson and Ronald Mintcr and 
13 from Hartkc and a dozen from 
Marlin Sims. 

NIU out muscled the Raiders 
21-10 on the offensive boards, 40- 
28 overall to lead to 52 percent 
second half shooting. 

NIU entered the final confer- 
ence game at Detroit Monday 
secured of a third seed (17-0, 10-5 
Midwestern , Collegiate 

Conference) in the league tour- 



nament March 2, 

"It is for the program. Wc had 
paid our dues - you try and get 
stronger and the third seed says a 
lot for the team. 

The squad is making 
progress. Wc have to think in 
terms of taking care of people 
who really support the program," 
Hammcl said. "It is being ready 
and taking care of business. Wc 
responded well to some good, 
strong crowds here. It was im- 
portant .to leave on a positive 
note. Hopefully wc can continue 
to build momentum 

Success is no stranger to 
Coleman. 

He burst onto the scene his 



soph year at Stevenson with 11.4 
points per game. It grew to 23 
points per game his junior year 
and 20 points a game his senior 
year. He said farewell to high 
school hoops by guiding 
Stevenson to the Elite Eight on a 
29-2 senior team. He Is a former 
winner of the Lakeland 
Newspapers Playcr-of-thc-Ycar 
honor. 

He lit up the scoreboard in 
Milwaukee as the Huskies raced 
past UW-M 100-90 to begin their 
three-game win streak, he scored 
21 points and had four free 
throws in double overtime. 

His first rebound against 
Detroit marked career No. 250. 



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